Individual Commitment And Organizational Change

Overview

Many writers assume that employees will be as committed as managers to changing work organizations to meet the demands of global competition. Charles Boyd discusses reasons why many employees do not commit to these changes. He explains how an oversized menu of life choices complicates many people's lives, with profound changes in the family, government, organized religion, and education adding to many people's confusion. These problems cause employees to reject still more change at work, making it difficult for ...

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Overview

Many writers assume that employees will be as committed as managers to changing work organizations to meet the demands of global competition. Charles Boyd discusses reasons why many employees do not commit to these changes. He explains how an oversized menu of life choices complicates many people's lives, with profound changes in the family, government, organized religion, and education adding to many people's confusion. These problems cause employees to reject still more change at work, making it difficult for managers to get the commitment they need to the changes they must make. Boyd explores the reasons for the changes in personal lives and in our society's institutions. He offers ways managers can get the commitment they need for organizational change.

The book opens with a thorough discussion of the forces making organizational change necessary. Boyd discusses the barriers to commitment inside and outside organizations that slow or block needed changes, and shows how managers can overcome these barriers. The book gives examples of organizations that gain commitment to change by using good compensation plans and by tying goals to employee achievement. Boyd discusses the importance of developing a more productive work force for global markets and how to do so. He concludes by describing the star organization, a type designed to meet employees' needs and today's changing economic demands. This book is an important guide for human resource managers, chief executive officers, and college and public libraries.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780899306414
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/24/1992
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

CHARLES BOYD is an Associate Professor of Management at Southwest Missouri State University.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
Pt. I The Forces of Change
Ch. 1 The Technological Force in Organizational Change 3
Two Viewpoints of Technological Change 5
Two Major Challenges 9
Conclusions 17
References 18
Ch. 2 The Meaning of Commitment 21
Individualism Since the 1920s 22
Why Individualism Has Changed 25
Problems with Objectivity 26
The Oversized Menu 31
The Self-Direction Alternative 33
Conclusions 36
References 37
Ch. 3 Barriers to Commitment in Organizations 39
The Compensation Gap 39
The Expectation-Reality Gap 42
The Goal-Achievement Gap 53
Conclusions 55
References 56
Ch. 4 Barriers to Commitment Outside the Organization 59
Family Stress 60
Government and Politics 67
Changes in Organized Religion 75
Education 80
Conclusions 85
References 86
Pt. II Getting Commitment
Ch. 5 Matching Expectations, Realities, and Compensation 91
Closing the Expectation-Reality Gap 91
Closing the Compensation Gap 101
Conclusions 109
References 110
Ch. 6 Ownership Commitment: Employee Stock Ownership Plans 113
A Brief History of ESOPs 113
How ESOPs Create Commitment 114
Springfield Remanufacturing Corporation 118
Springfield Community Hospital 125
Conclusions 127
References 129
Ch. 7 Ownership Commitment: Intrapreneurship 131
The Nature of Intrapreneurship 132
Revolutionary Change in an Industry: Health Care 136
Evolution of an Organization: Springfield Remanufacturing Corporation Revisited 141
Conclusions 143
References 144
Ch. 8 Connecting Goals and Achievements 147
The Productivity Imperative 148
Foreign Trade and Foreign Ownership 153
Developing Our Work Force 157
Conclusions 159
References 161
Ch. 9 Building Star Organizations 163
Points of the Star 164
Managing the Star Organization 173
The Meaning of the Star Organization 176
References 177
Ch. 10 Linking Organizations with Society 179
Helping Families Cope 179
Government and Politics 184
Organized Religion 186
Education 188
Conclusions 199
References 199
Ch. 11 Living and Working Better 201
Bibliography 211
Index 219
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