Indography: Writing the "Indian" in Early Modern England

Overview

In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Europeans invented 'Indians' and populated the world with them. The global history of the term 'Indian' remains largely unwritten and this volume, taking its cue from Shakespeare, asks us to consider the proximities and distances between various early modern discourses of the Indian. Through new analysis of English travel writing, medical treatises, literature, and drama, contributors seek not just to recover unexpected counter-histories but to put pressure on the ways in...

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Indography: Writing the

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Overview

In the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, Europeans invented 'Indians' and populated the world with them. The global history of the term 'Indian' remains largely unwritten and this volume, taking its cue from Shakespeare, asks us to consider the proximities and distances between various early modern discourses of the Indian. Through new analysis of English travel writing, medical treatises, literature, and drama, contributors seek not just to recover unexpected counter-histories but to put pressure on the ways in which we understand race, foreign bodies, and identity in a globalizing age that has still not shed deeply ingrained imperialist habits of marking difference.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
'In 1614, Samuel Purchas noted that India was a term that had begun to be used to describe 'all farre-distant Countries.' This volume is a careful, thought-provoking and wide-ranging analysis of the meaning, implications and consequences of that usage. It uncovers the astonishing diversity of peoples and locations signified by the term in early modern English writings. Even more important, it tracks the connections between the different 'Indians' forged through material as well as imaginative channels. 'India' and 'Indians' emerge as important points of entry into the early histories and discourses of globalization. An important and illuminating book.' - Ania Loomba, Catherine Bryson Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania

"The geographic miscalculation that persuaded Columbus to identify the New World as part of 'India' is at once so gross and so familiar that its imaginative consequences have never seemed to deserve serious consideration. The brilliant tessellation of essays that make up Indography show how mistaken that neglect has been. By opening a fascinating variety of perspectives on the many 'Indias' of the Renaissance imaginary, Gil Harris and his contributors promise to transform our understanding of early modern ethnography and its relation to the discourses of trade and empire." - Michael Neill, emeritus professor of English, University of Auckland

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780230341371
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 5/8/2012
  • Series: Signs of Race Series
  • Pages: 280
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan Gil Harris is a professor of English at George Washington University. He is the author of Foreign Bodies and the Body Politic: Discourses of Social Pathology in Early Modern England; Sick Economies: Drama, Mercantilism and Disease; Untimely Matter in the Time of Shakespeare; Shakespeare and Literary Theory; and Marvellous Repossessions: The Tempest, Globalization, and the Waking Dream of Paradise. He is the editor, with Natasha Korda, of Staged Properties in Early Modern English Drama, and the editor of the 3rd New Mermaids edition of Thomas Dekker's The Shoemaker's Holiday. He is also associate editor of Shakespeare Quarterly.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction: Forms of Indography Jonathan Gil Harris 1

I Indology: Discovery, Ethnography, Pathology

1 How to Make an Indian: Religion, Trade, and Translation in the Legends of Mõnçaide and Gaspar da Gama Bindu Malieckal 23

2 Looking for Loss, Anticipating Absence: Imagining Indians in the Archives and Depictions of Roanoke's Lost Colony Gina Caison 43

3 From First Encounter to "Fiery Oven": The Effacement of the New England Indian in Mourt's Relation and Histories of the Pequot War Thomas Cartelli 57

4 Trafficking in Tangomóckomindge: Ethnographic Materials in Harriot's A Briefe and True Report Kevin Boettcher 71

5 Translation and Identity in the Dialogues in the English and Malaiane Languages Melissa Walter 85

6 Playing Indian: John Smith, Pocahontas, and a Dialogue about a Chain of Pearl Karen Robertson 105

7 Tobacco, Union, and the Indianized English Craig Rustici 117

8 Sick Ethnography: Recording the Indian and the Ill English Body Jonathan Gil Harris 133

II Indopoesis: Poetry, Drama, Romance

9 Spenser's "Men of Inde": Mythologizing the Indian through the Genealogy of Faeries Marion Hollings 151

10 From Lunacy to Faith: Orlando's Own Private India in Robert Greene's Orlando Furioso James W. Stone 169

11 "Enter Orlando with a scarf before his face": Indians, Moors, and the Properties of Racial Transformation in Robert Greene's The Historie of Orlando Furioso Gavin Hollis 183

12 "Does this become you, Princess?": East Indian Ethopoetics in John Fletcher's The Island Princess Jeanette N. Tran 197

13 Playing an Indian Queen: Neoplatonism, Ethnography, and The Temple of Love Amrita Sen 209

14 Made in India: How Meriton Latroon Became an Englishman Carmen Nocentelli 223

15 "A Weil-Born Race": Aphra Behn's The Widow Ranter; or, The History of Bacon in Virginia and the Place of Proximity Sara Eaton 235

Afterword: Naming and Un-Naming "all the Indies": How India Became Hindustan Jyotsna G. Singh 249

Notes on Contributors 257

Index 261

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