Indoor Bonsai for Beginners: Selection - Care - Training

Indoor Bonsai for Beginners: Selection - Care - Training

3.5 2
by Werner Busch
     
 

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Creating beautiful, healthy bonsai is a wonderful skill that anyone can learn, with a little time, patience, and this all-inclusive manual. With color photos and drawings to illustrate the points, it introduces all the cultivation techniques; offers expert advice on location, soil types, watering, and pest control; and provides intricate instruction on training the

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Overview

Creating beautiful, healthy bonsai is a wonderful skill that anyone can learn, with a little time, patience, and this all-inclusive manual. With color photos and drawings to illustrate the points, it introduces all the cultivation techniques; offers expert advice on location, soil types, watering, and pest control; and provides intricate instruction on training the bonsai—including pruning, wiring and stretching it. An A-to-Z guide of all the popular species showcases varieties that range from a flowering Camellia Japonica, with its beautiful smooth stem, to an easy-to-care for Olive tree. Each entry gives some background on the plant, and includes suggestions for acquiring the bonsai and directions on how to position it in the room for best results.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781844033508
Publisher:
Octopus Books
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
240,667
Product dimensions:
6.75(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
3 Months to 18 Years

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Indoor Bonsai for Beginners: Selection - Care - Training 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. What the writer did well, they did very well. Unfortunately, there were a number of things I thought they could have done much better. First of all, there is no such thing as an indoor bonsai. All plants are by nature outdoor creatures, and keeping them indoors is artificial. Indoor environments can provide some elements of the native habitat, but not all. I know that sounds like a purist, but the point needs to be made. The good: The pictures are very well done, and the whole book just a pleasure to read. The writer is to the point, fairly inclusive (with some exceptions) and very accessible—a recommended book for beginners (like me). The information he includes is generally very good. For instance, as one other reviewer mentioned, the pruning guide is quite good for such a short book.  The list of plants and their descriptions and care guides was well done and very appreciated. There were lots of plants, some of which I already knew about but had never considered trying to make into a bonsai. The bad: I thought the section on pests could be expanded. He gives some general treatments, but never any discussion on what treatments might be appropriate, or more effective (or even harmful!) for different infestations.  Some of the care information could have been expanded. In particular, the description of the recommended soil blend could use a lot of elaboration. First of all, exactly half of the plants he lists are suggested to use “Metro mix 510” as a component of the soil. What is it? He never explains. Apparently it is a “professional” commercial soil mix for container plants, which includes bark, ash, sphagnum peat, and vermiculite. But in what ratios? If I wanted to buy it, where can I get it? He never addresses those questions—so a reader unable to find those components or desiring to make their own soil based on the suggestions is left in the dark wondering what to do. Because most of the plants listed are not true “indoor” bonsai, most of them end up with descriptions including how to winterize them in a place where they can go dormant, which means an outdoor or semi-outdoor location. This makes the whole concept of “indoor” deceptive, as I mentioned. The writer never really admits that point. Some of the instructions are a bit vague as well. Overall, I very much enjoy the book, and don’t regret getting it. I have read most of it twice, in fact, and I will keep it around as reference. But some of the information could be improved greatly. It’s not a perfect book, but it is a good book. With a few other books on bonsai, a diligent reader should be well equipped to try keeping some bonsai indoors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago