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Induced Responses to Herbivory
     

Induced Responses to Herbivory

by Richard Karban
 

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Plants face a daunting array of creatures that eat them, bore into them, and otherwise use virtually every plant part for food, shelter, or both. But although plants cannot flee from their attackers, they are far from defenseless. In addition to adaptations like thorns, which may be produced in response to attack, plants actively alter their chemistry and physiology

Overview

Plants face a daunting array of creatures that eat them, bore into them, and otherwise use virtually every plant part for food, shelter, or both. But although plants cannot flee from their attackers, they are far from defenseless. In addition to adaptations like thorns, which may be produced in response to attack, plants actively alter their chemistry and physiology in response to damage. For instance, young potato plant leaves being eaten by potato beetles respond by producing chemicals that inhibit beetle digestive enzymes.

Over the past fifteen years, research on these induced responses to herbivory has flourished, and here Richard Karban and Ian T. Baldwin present the first comprehensive evaluation and synthesis of this rapidly developing field. They provide state-of-the-discipline reviews and highlight areas where new research will be most productive. Their comprehensive overview will be welcomed by a wide variety of theoretical and applied researchers in ecology, evolutionary biology, plant biology, entomology, and agriculture.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Explains the mechanisms by which plants protect themselves from being further eaten, especially by insects, after they have once been nibbled on, as opposed to those defensive measures that all members of the species take. Investigates how the plant reacts to the damage itself, how it signals other parts of it to take action, and the possibility that signals are transmitted between nearby plants. Also explores the impact on populations and evolution, and how induced resistance can be used in agriculture. Paper edition (unseen), $17.95. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226424972
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
12/01/2007
Series:
Interspecific Interactions
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
330
File size:
4 MB

Meet the Author

Richard Karban is professor of entomology and a member of the Center for Population Biology at the University of California, Davis. He is coauthor of How to Do Ecology: A Concise Handbook.

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