Industrial Ecology and Sustainable Engineering / Edition 1

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Overview

KEY BENEFIT: The first book of its kind devoted completely to industrial ecology/green engineering, this introduction uses industrial ecology principles and cases to ground the discussion of sustainable engineering–and offers practical and reasonable approaches to design decisions. KEY TOPICS: Technology and Sustainability; Industrial Ecology(IE) and Sustainable Engineering (SE) Concepts; Relevance of Biological Ecology to Technology; Metabolic Analysis; Technological Change and Evolving Risk; Social Dimensions of Industrial Ecology; Concept of Sustainability; SE; Industrial Product Development; Design for Environment and for Sustainability; Introduction to Life-Cycle Assessment; LCA Impact and Interpretation Stages; Streamlining the LCA Process; Systems Analysis; Industrial Ecosystems; Material Flow Analysis; National Material Accounts; Energy and IE; Water and IE; Urban IE; Modeling in IE; Scenarios for IE; Status of Resources; IE and SE in Developing Countries; IE and Sustainability in the Corporation/Government/Society MARKET: A useful reference for professionals in environmental science, environmental policy, and engineering.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780136008064
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 10/9/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 577,671
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

PART I. INTRODUCING THE FIELD

1. TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABILITY

1.1 An integrated system

1.2 The tragedy of the commons

1.3 The master equation

1.4 Technological evolution

1.5 Addressing the challenge

Further Reading

2. INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING CONCEPTS

2.1 From contemporaneous thinking to forward thinking

2.2 The greening of engineering

2.3 Linking industrial activity with environmental and social sciences

2.4 The challenge of quantification and rigor

2.5 Key questions of industrial ecology and sustainable engineering

2.6 An overview of this book

Further Reading

PART II. FRAMEWORK TOPICS

3. THE RELEVANCE OF BIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY TO TECHNOLOGY

3.1 Considering the analogy

3.2 Biological and industrial organisms

3.3 Biological and industrial ecosystems

3.4 Engineering by biological and industrial organisms

3.5 Evolution

3.6 The utility of the ecological approach

Further Reading

4. METABOLIC ANALYSIS

4.1 The concept of metabolism

4.2 Metabolisms of biological organisms

4.3 Metabolisms of industrial organisms

4.4 The utility of metabolic analysis

Further Reading

5. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND EVOLVING RISK

5.1 Historical patterns in technological evolution

5.2 Approaches to risk

5.3 Risk assessment

5.4 Risk communication

5.5 Risk management

Further Reading

6. THE SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

6.1 Framing industrial ecology and sustainable engineering within society

6.2 Cultural constructs and temporal scales

6.3 Social ecology

6.4 Consumption

6.5 Government and governance

6.6 Legal and ethical concerns

6.7 Economics and industrial ecology

Further Reading

7. THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABILITY

7.1 Is humanity’s path unsustainable?

7.2 Components of a sustainability transition

7.3 Quantifying sustainability

7.3.1 Example 1: Sustainable supplies of zinc

7.3.2 Example 2: Sustainable supplies of germanium

7.3.3 Example 3: Sustainable production of greenhouse gases

7.3.4 Issues in quantifying sustainability

7.4 Linking industrial ecology activities to sustainability

7.4.1 The Grand Objectives

7.4.2 Linking the grand objectives to environmental science

7.4.3 Targeted activities of technological societies

7.4.4 Actions for an industrialized society

Further Reading

PART III. IMPLEMENTATION

8. SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING

8.1 Engineering and the industrial sequence

8.2 Green chemistry

8.3 Green engineering

8.4 The process design challenge

8.5 Pollution prevention

8.6 The challenge of water availability

8.7 The process life cycle

8.7.1 Resource provisioning

8.7.2 Process implementation

8.7.3 Primary process operation

8.7.4 Complementary process operation

8.7.5 Refurbishment, recycling, and disposal

8.8 Green technology and sustainability

Further Reading

9. INDUSTRIAL PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

9.1 The product development challenge

9.2 Conceptual tools for product designers

9.2.1 The Pugh selection matrix

9.2.2 The house of quality

9.3 Design for X

9.4 Product design teams

9.5 The Product Realization Process

Further Reading

10. DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT AND FOR SUSTAINABILITY

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Choosing materials

10.3 Combining materials

10.4 Product delivery

10.5 The product use phase

10.6 Designing for reuse and recycling

10.6.1 The comet diagram

10.6.2 Approaches to design for recycling

10.7 Guidelines for ecodesign

Further Reading

11. AN INTRODUCTION TO LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT

11.1 The concept of the life cycle

11.2 The LCA framework

11.3 Goal setting and scope determination

11.4 Defining boundaries

11.4.1 Level of detail boundaries

11.4.2 The natural ecosystem boundary

11.4.3 Boundaries in space and time

11.4.4 Choosing boundaries

11.5 Approaches to data acquisition

11.6 The life cycle of industrial products

11.7 The utility of life-cycle inventory analysis

Further Reading

12. THE LCA IMPACT AND INTERPRETATION STAGES

12.1 LCA impact analysis

12.2 Interpretation

12.2.1 Identify significant issues in the results

12.2.2 Evaluate the data used in the LCA

12.2.3 Draw conclusions and recommendations

12.3 LCA software

12.4 Prioritizing recommendations

12.4.1 Approaches to prioritization

12.4.2 The action-agent prioritization diagram

12.4.3 The life-stage prioritization diagram

12. 5The limitations of LCA

Further Reading

13. STREAMLINING THE LCA PROCESS

13.1 Needs of the LCA user community

13.2 The assessment continuum

13.3 Preserving perspective while streamlining

13.4 The SLCA matrix

13.5 Target plots

13.6 Assessing generic automobiles of yesterday and today

13.7 Weighting in SLCA

13.8 SLCA assets and liabilities

13.9 The LCA/SLCA family

Further Reading

PART IV. ANALYSIS OF TECHNOLOGICAL SYSTEMS

14. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

14.1 The systems concept

14.2 The adaptive cycle

14.3 Holarchies

14.4 The phenomenon of emergent behavior

14.5 Adaptive management of technological holarchies

Further Reading

15. INDUSTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

15.1 Ecosystems and food chains

15.2 Food webs

15.3 Industrial symbiosis

15.4 Designing and developing symbiotic industrial ecosystems

15.5 Uncovering and stimulating industrial ecosystems

15.6 Island biogeography and island industrogeography

Further Reading

16. MATERIAL FLOW ANALYSIS

16.1 Budgets and cycles

16.2 Resource analyses in industrial ecology

16.2.1 Elemental substance analyses

16.2.2 Molecular analyses

16.3 The balance between natural and anthropogenic mobilization of resources

16.4 The utility of substance flow analysis

Further Reading

17. NATIONAL MATERIAL ACCOUNTS

17.1 National —level accounting

17.2 Country-level metabolisms

17.3 Embodiments in trade

17.4 Resource productivity

17.5 Input-output tables

17.6 The utility of metabolic and resource analyses

Further Reading

18. ENERGY AND INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

18.1 Energy and organisms

18.2 Energy and the product life cycle

18.3 The energy cycle for a substance

18.4 National and global energy analyses

18.5 Energy and mineral resources

18.6 Energy and industrial ecology

Further Reading

19. WATER AND INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

19.1 Water: An introduction

19.2 Water and organisms

19.3 Water and products

19.4 The water footprint

19.5Water quality

19.6 Industrial ecology and water futures

Further Reading

20. URBAN INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

20.1 The city as an organism

20.2 Urban metabolic flows

20.3 Urban metabolic stocks

20.4 Urban metabolic histories

20.5 Urban mining

20.6 Potential benefits of urban metabolic studies

Further Reading

21. MODELING IN INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

21.1 What is an industrial ecology model?

21.2 Building the conceptual model

21.2.1 The Class 1 industrial ecology model

21.2.2 The Class 2 industrial ecology model

21.2.3 The Class 3 industrial ecology model

21.3 Running and evaluating industrial ecology models

21.3.1 Implementing the model

21.3.2 Model validation

21.4 Examples of industrial ecology models

21.5 The status of industrial ecology models

Further Reading

PART V. THINKING AHEAD

22. SCENARIOS FOR INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

22.1 What is an industrial ecology scenario?

22.2 Building the scenario

22.3 Examples of industrial ecology scenarios

22.4 The status of industrial ecology scenarios

Further Reading

23. THE STATUS OF RESOURCES

23.1 Introduction

23.2 Mineral resources scarcity

23.3 Cumulative supply curves

23.4 Energy resources

23.5 Water resources

23.6 Summary

Further Reading

24. INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE ENGINEERING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

24.1 The three groupings

24.2 RDC/SDC dynamics and perspectives

24.3 Thoughts on development in LDCs

Further Reading

25. INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABILITY IN THE CORPORATION

25.1 The manufacturing sector, industrial ecology, and sustainability

25.2 The service sector, industrial ecology, and sustainability

25.3 Environment and sustainability as strategic

25.4 The corporate economic benefits of environment and sustainability

25.5 Implementing industrial ecology in the corporation

Further Reading

26. INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND SUSTAINABILITY IN GOVERNMENT AND SOCIETY

26.1 Ecological engineering

26.2 Earth systems engineering and management

26.3 Regional scale ESEM: The Florida Everglades

26.4 Global scale ESEM: Stratospheric ozone and CFCs

26.5 Global scale ESEM: Combating global warming

26.6 The principles of ESEM

26.6.1 Theoretical principles of ESEM

26.6.2 Governance principles of ESEM

26.6.3 Design and engineering principles of ESEM

26.7 Facing the ESEM question

Further Reading

27. LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

27.1 A status report

27.2 No simple answers

27.3 Foci for research

27.4 Themes and transitions

Further Reading

APPENDICES

UNITS OF MEASUREMENT IN INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY

SLCA GUIDELINES

GLOSSARY

INDEX

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