Industrial Ecology : Policy Framework and Implementation / Edition 1

Industrial Ecology : Policy Framework and Implementation / Edition 1

by Braden R. Allenby
     
 

ISBN-10: 0139211802

ISBN-13: 9780139211805

Pub. Date: 06/09/1998

Publisher: Pearson Education

This unique and important book takes a multidisciplinary approach to an integrated discussion of the issues related to industrial ecology and sustainable development. It also provides the first integrated view of the implications of industrial ecology and sustainability policy issues. Provides a guide to the policies of industrial ecology and sustainability through

Overview

This unique and important book takes a multidisciplinary approach to an integrated discussion of the issues related to industrial ecology and sustainable development. It also provides the first integrated view of the implications of industrial ecology and sustainability policy issues. Provides a guide to the policies of industrial ecology and sustainability through actual case studies that incorporate real world multidisciplinary examples. It also features exercises that are designed to encourage understanding of the issues and offer a means of applying those issues to the real world. An essential resource on industrial ecology and sustainable development for professionals in engineering, environmental science, and economics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780139211805
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
06/09/1998
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
7.26(w) x 9.54(h) x 0.82(d)

Table of Contents

PART I: A NEW POLICY FRAMEWORK 1(130)
1: INTRODUCTION
2(9)
1.1 The Global Context
2(4)
1.2 The Need for an Industrial Ecology Approach
6(4)
References
10(1)
Exercises
10(1)
2: OVERVIEW OF THE INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY INTELLECTUAL FRAMEWORK
11(6)
References
15(1)
Exercises
16(1)
3: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
17(23)
3.1 Sustainable Development: Definition
17(1)
3.2 Implications of Sustainable Development
18(2)
3.3 Ideological Dimensions of Sustainable Development
20(2)
3.4 The Master Equation
22(12)
3.4.1 Environmental Impact
22(2)
3.4.1.1 Maintaining the existence of the human species
24(1)
3.4.1.2 Developing and maintaining the capacity for sustainable development
25(1)
3.4.1.3 Biodiversity
25(1)
3.4.1.4 Aesthetic richness
26(1)
3.4.1.5 Are current levels of environmental impact sustainable?
26(1)
3.4.2 Population
27(2)
3.4.3 Per Capita Wealth
29(3)
3.4.4 Environmental Impact per Unit of Production
32(1)
3.4.5 Culture and Technology
33(1)
3.5 Human Carrying Capacity and Social Free Will
34(4)
3.5.1 Human Carrying Capacity
34(1)
3.5.2 Social Free Will
35(3)
References
38(1)
Exercises
39(1)
4: INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY
40(23)
4.1 Definition of Industrial Ecology
40(1)
4.2 History of Industrial Ecology
41(2)
4.3 Industrial Ecology Model Systems
43(8)
4.3.1 Systems Orientation
46(1)
4.3.2 Complexity and Carrying Capacity
47(1)
4.3.3 Scale Issues
47(1)
4.3.4 Co-evolution of Human and Natural Systems
47(4)
4.4 Principles of Industrial Ecology
51(2)
4.5 Perspectives on Industrial Ecology
53(1)
4.6 Illustrative Case Study: The Automotive Technology System
54(7)
4.6.1 Evolution of the Automotive as Artifact
54(1)
4.6.2 Stages in the Integration of Environment and Technology
55(2)
4.6.3 The Automotive Technology System
57(4)
References
61(1)
Exercises
62(1)
5: INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE
63(6)
5.1 Definition
63(1)
5.2 Establishing Appropriate Regulatory Policies
64(1)
5.3 Identification and Prioritization of Risks, Costs, and Benefits
65(1)
5.4 Prioritizing Values
66(1)
5.5 Research and Development
67(1)
References
68(1)
Exercises
68(1)
6: APPLICATIONS TO PRACTICE: SECTOR INITIATIVES
69(27)
6.1 Applications to Practice
69(1)
6.2 Design For Environment (DFE)
70(1)
6.3 Sustainable Agriculture
71(2)
6.4 Sustainable Forestry
73(1)
6.5 Sustainable Fisheries
74(2)
6.6 Integrated Materials Management
76(5)
6.7 Environmentally Preferable Services (EPS)
81(8)
6.7.1 The Information Revolution
85(4)
6.8 Green Construction
89(1)
6.9 Energy
90(4)
References
94(1)
Exercises
95(1)
7: APPLICATIONS TO PRACTICE: TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS
96(18)
7.1 The Role of Techniques and Tools
96(1)
7.2 Sustainability Indicators, Metrics, and Sensors
97(7)
7.2.1 Integrated Indicator Systems
97(2)
7.2.2 Indicator System Development
99(5)
7.3 Economic Reform
104(4)
7.3.2 Green Accounting Systems
106(2)
7.4 Design for Environment and Life-Cycle Assessment Tools
108(1)
7.5 Biological Engineering
109(2)
7.6 Comprehensive Risk Assessment Methodologies
111(1)
References
112(1)
Exercises
113(1)
8: APPLICATIONS TO PRACTICE: RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
114(17)
8.1 Why Research and Development Matters
114(2)
8.2 Changing Research and Development Patterns
116(1)
8.3 Funding Industrial Ecology Research
117(2)
8.4 Illustrative Industrial Ecology Research and Development Projects
119(2)
8.4.1 Material Stock and Flow Models
119(1)
8.4.2 Energy System Models
119(1)
8.4.3 Physical Models of Communities
120(1)
8.4.4 Sector Models
120(1)
8.4.5 Technological Evolution
120(1)
8.4.6 Industrial Ecology Policy Studies
121(1)
8.4.7 Data Management and Integration
121(1)
8.5 An Overview of Industrial Ecology Research Requirements
121(5)
8.5.1 Analytical Units
121(3)
8.5.2 Types of Analysis
124(1)
8.5.3 Metrics
124(1)
8.5.4 Evaluating a Small Community
125(1)
8.6 Earth Systems Science and Engineering
126(2)
References
128(1)
Exercises
128(3)
PART II: INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY POLICY DEVELOPMENT 131(96)
9: COMPLEX SYSTEMS
133(15)
9.1 Why Assumptions about Systems Matter
133(1)
9.2 Simple and Complex Systems
134(5)
9.2.1 Linearity
136(1)
9.2.2 Causality
136(1)
9.2.3 Lags, Discontinuities, Limits, and Thresholds
136(1)
9.2.4 Process as Endpoint
137(1)
9.2.5 Emergent Behavior
137(1)
9.2.6 System Evolution
138(1)
9.3 Integrating System Levels in Industrial Ecology
139(1)
9.4 Policy Implications of System Structure
139(3)
9.5 An Information Dense, Sustainable Economy
142(4)
9.5.1 The Automotive Technology System, Information, and Complexity
142(2)
9.5.2 Defining the Information Density of an Economy
144(2)
References
146(1)
Exercises
147(1)
10: RISKS, COSTS, AND BENEFITS
148(15)
10.1 Overview
148(1)
10.2 Cost/Benefit Analysis
149(1)
10.3 Risk Assessment
150(4)
10.4 Comprehensive Risk Assessments (CRAs)
154(3)
10.5 Development of a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Methodology
157(2)
10.6 Integrating Risk, Costs, and Benefits into a Comprehensive Policy Support Assessment
159(2)
References
161(1)
Exercises
162(1)
11: ECONOMIC ISSUES
163(15)
11.1 Overview
163(1)
11.2 Elements of Economic Theory and Practice
164(9)
11.2.1 Issues of Scale
164(1)
11.2.2 Issues of Scope
165(2)
11.2.3 Discount Rates
167(1)
11.2.4 Substitutability versus Complementarity of Resources
168(1)
11.2.5 Externalities
169(1)
11.2.6 Rational Agents
170(1)
11.2.7 Static versus Dynamic Analysis
171(2)
11.3 Labor Impacts
173(1)
11.4 Finance, Capital, and Investment
174(2)
References
176(2)
12: LEGAL ISSUES
178(19)
12.1 Fundamental Legal Issues
180(9)
12.1.1 Intragenerational Equity
182(1)
12.1.2 Intergenerational Equity
182(1)
12.1.3 Flexibility of Legal Tools
183(1)
12.1.4 Regulatory Management Structure
184(1)
12.1.4.1 Boundary Conditions versus Targeted Intervention
185(1)
12.1.4.2 Decentralized Mechanisms versus Centralized Micromanagement
185(1)
12.1.5 Determining Appropriate Jurisdictional Level
186(1)
12.1.5.1 Policy Harmonization
187(1)
12.1.5.2 Integrating Policy Hierarchies
188(1)
12.2 Specific Legal Issues
189(6)
12.2.1 Trade and Environment
189(1)
12.2.2 Consumer Protection Law
190(1)
12.2.3 Government Procurement
191(1)
12.2.4 Government Standards and Specifications
192(1)
12.2.5 Antitrust
193(1)
12.2.6 Existing Environmental Law
194(1)
References
195(1)
Exercises
195(2)
13: GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE AND INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY POLICY FORMULATION
197(20)
13.1 Overview
197(1)
13.2 Policy Life Cycle
197(2)
13.3 Temporal and Geographic Scale Considerations
199(3)
13.3.1 Increasing Flexibility and Generality with Time
200(1)
13.3.2 Reliance on Incentives
200(1)
13.3.3 Increasing Culture Change Dimension Over Time
201(1)
13.3.4 Linking Policy with Long-Term National Goals
201(1)
13.4 Relevant Dimensions of National States
202(3)
13.4.1 Form of Government
202(1)
13.4.2 Wealth
202(1)
13.4.3 Size of Market
203(1)
13.4.4 Issue
203(1)
13.4.5 Culture and Ideology
203(1)
13.4.6 Relationship Between Private and Public Sectors
204(1)
13.4.7 Factors Affecting Development
205(1)
13.5 Regulatory Structure
205(10)
References
215(1)
Exercises
215(2)
14: THE PRIVATE FIRM
217(10)
14.1 Overview
217(1)
14.2 The Firm as Evil Black Box
218(2)
14.3 Environment as Strategic for the Firm
220(3)
14.4 Implementing Industrial Ecology
223(2)
14.4.1 Establish Tactical Organizational Structures
224(1)
14.4.2 Establish Training Programs
224(1)
14.4.3 Establish Technical Support
225(1)
14.4.4 Generate Initial Successes
225(1)
References
225(1)
Exercises
226(1)
PART III: CASE STUDIES 227(76)
15: STRUCTURED DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT CASE STUDY: THE AT&T MATRIX SYSTEM
229(18)
15.1 Overview
229(2)
15.2 The Materials Matrix System
231(14)
15.2.1 Characteristics of a Material Environmental Evaluation Matrix
232(1)
15.2.2 Matrix Structure
233(3)
15.2.3 The Materials Matrix Checklist
236(9)
References
245(1)
Exercises
246(1)
16: IS THE PRIVATE FIRM COMPATIBLE WITH A SUSTAINABLE WORLD?
247(18)
16.1 Introduction to the Case
247(2)
16.2 The Private Firm
249(3)
16.3 The Firm as Agent in a Complex System
252(1)
16.4 Recent Trends
253(8)
16.4.1 The Fundamental Conflict Between Uncontrolled Growth and an Environmentally Constrained World
253(1)
16.4.2 Firms and Technology
254(1)
16.4.3 Firms and Social Costing
255(1)
16.4.4 Scale and Scope of Firms
256(1)
16.4.5 Current Evolutionary Trends
257(4)
16.5 A Planned Evolution of the Private Firm?
261(2)
References
263(1)
Exercises
263(2)
17: POLICY CASE STUDY: THE NETHERLANDS
265(14)
17.1 Introduction
265(1)
17.2 Policy Overview and Indicator Development
265(2)
17.3 Target Groups
267(1)
17.4 Covenants
268(1)
17.5 Product Life-Cycle Policy
269(2)
17.6 Program Scope
271(1)
17.7 Role of Technology
272(2)
17.8 Program Evaluation
274(2)
References
276(1)
Exercises
277(2)
18: ENHANCED NATIONAL SECURITY CASE STUDY: THE UNITED STATES
279(24)
18.1 Introduction
279(1)
18.2 The MILSPEC/MILSTD Ozone Depletion Example
280(2)
18.3 Changing Dimensions of National Security
282(4)
18.3.1 Environmental Security as U.S. Policy
282(2)
18.3.2 Environmental Foreign Policy versus Environmental Security
284(2)
18.3.3 Collaborative versus Adversarial Approaches to Post Cold War Security Issues
286(1)
18.4 The Role of Institutional Cultures and Capabilities
286(2)
18.5 Environmental Security Test
288(1)
18.6 An Operational Definition of Environmental Security
288(2)
18.7 Intentional and Unintentional Perturbations
290(1)
18.8 Structuring the Environmental Security Mission
291(3)
18.9 Prioritizing Environmental Security Issues
294(7)
18.9.1 Water and Food in Mexico
296(2)
18.9.2 Nuclear Materials
298(3)
18.10 Conclusion
301(1)
References
301(1)
Exercises
302(1)
INDEX 303

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