Industrial Park

Overview


A member of Brazil's avant-garde in its heyday. Patrícia Galvão (or to use her nickname, Pagu) was extraordinary. Not only was her work among the most exciting and innovative published in the 1930s, it was unique in portraying an avant-garde woman's view of women in Sao Paulo during that audacious period.
 
Industrial Park, first published in 1933, is Galvão's most notable literary achieve-ment. Like Döblin's portrayal of Berlin in ...
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Overview


A member of Brazil's avant-garde in its heyday. Patrícia Galvão (or to use her nickname, Pagu) was extraordinary. Not only was her work among the most exciting and innovative published in the 1930s, it was unique in portraying an avant-garde woman's view of women in Sao Paulo during that audacious period.
 
Industrial Park, first published in 1933, is Galvão's most notable literary achieve-ment. Like Döblin's portrayal of Berlin in Alexanderplatz or Biely's St Petersburg, it is a book about the voices, clashes, and traffic of a city in the middle of rapid change. It includes fragments of public documents as well as dialogue and narration, giving a panorama of the city in a sequence of colorful slices.
 
The novel dramatizes the problems of exploitation, poverty, racial prejudice, prostitution, state repression, and neocolonialism, but it is by no means a doctrinaire tract. Galvão's ironic wit pervades the novel, aspiring not only to describe the teeming city but also to put art and politics in each other's service.
 
Like many of her contemporaries Galvão was a member of the Brazilian Communist Party. She attracted Party criticism for her unorthodox behavior and outspokenness. A visit to Moscow in 1934 disenchanted her with the communist state, but she continued to militate for change upon returning to Brazil. She was imprisoned and tortured under the Vargas dictatorship between 1935 and 1940. In the 1940s she returned to the public through her journalism and literary activities. She died in 1962.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This powerful volume by Galvao (who wrote under the name Pagu) vividly portrays the turbulent life of workers in Brazil in the 1930s. Appearing in English for the first time, in a forceful and sensitive translation, the story follows the struggles of three female workers in Sao Paulo. Corina, a mulatto, is fired when she becomes pregnant. She turns to prostitution and eventually is jailed for killing her infant, who is born without skin. Eleonora escapes the poverty of the workers' existence by marrying Alfredo Rocha, a rich dabbler in Marxism. Otavia is a Communist organizer who also becomes involved with Alfredo. The story is told in an impressionistic style, with brief vignettes conveying character and plot. Sao Paulo, a city undergoing rapid change, becomes as much a character as the women themselves: Marxist ferment and labor organizing are pervasive; a workers' strike is brutally put down. Through it all, these strong women survive--in a world where sharing salted popcorn with a lover is ultimately more real than all the talk of the triumph of the proletariat. A well-written preface and afterword by the translators provide helpful context and introduce readers to the Brazilian argot of the period. (Dec.)
Library Journal
Originally published in 1933, a time of extreme economic and social turmoil in Sao Paulo, Brazil, this novel was created as unabashed Communist propaganda in support of the workers' movement there. It depicts heroic labor organizers in the Braz factory district risking everything as they battle corrupt capitalists on behalf of the proletariat. Using avant-garde narrative techniques, the author mimics film cross-cutting, juxtaposing dramatically the perverse, shallow aristocracy and the miserable lower orders. The translators' preface and afterword to this literary artifact illuminate a place and period unfamiliar to many Americans and introduce the fascinating ``Pagu,'' an outrageous character who penned this book while in her early twenties. A leader among radical artists and thinkers, she spent years in prison for her beliefs and became a cultural icon in Brazil after her death. For collections with comprehensive coverage in Latin American studies, women's studies, and literature in translation.-- Starr E. Smith, Fairfax Cty. P.L., Va.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803270411
  • Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/1993
  • Series: Latin American Women Writers Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 154
  • Product dimensions: 0.39 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 8.00 (d)

Meet the Author


K. David Jackson is a professor of Portuguese language and literature at Yale University. Elizabeth Jackson coordinates a middle school curriculum project on Brazil for the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.
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Table of Contents

Translators' Preface vii
Industrial Park 3
Afterword 115
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