Infamous [Music from the Motion Picture]

Infamous [Music from the Motion Picture]

5.0 1
by Rachel Portman
     
 
Rachel Portman's original score for Douglas McGrath's Truman Capote biopic Infamous is one of her most signature efforts. Full of understated grace and tension, her way of whispering a narrative along, incrementally building tension to a breaking point albeit with swing, jazz and pop interludes that frame the era perfectly -- it's

Overview

Rachel Portman's original score for Douglas McGrath's Truman Capote biopic Infamous is one of her most signature efforts. Full of understated grace and tension, her way of whispering a narrative along, incrementally building tension to a breaking point albeit with swing, jazz and pop interludes that frame the era perfectly -- it's all there. On Infamous, Portman doesn't need to move the plot along so much as freeze frame it in the brain of the viewer when seen onscreen. When heard, however, the effect is one of melancholy moments, bittersweet harmonic gestures, and poetic understatement. Of course there are some additions to the set as well as original music. The reading of Cole Porter's "What Is This Thing Called Love," sung by Gwyneth Paltrow is rather startling -- and no, not in a good way -- she is flat, lifeless, and utterly tepid, despite a band that is fiery and swinging with a fingerpopping verve; bassist Mark Rubin is particularly engaging here, though, as well as on the Hoffman and Klenner classic "Heartaches." Other aspects of the soundtrack listeners may find delightful are Johnny Bond's reading of Harlan Howard's "How About You," and the late Dusty Spirngfield's beautiful recording of "Yesterday When I Was Young."

Product Details

Release Date:
10/17/2006
Label:
Milan Records
UPC:
0731383618925
catalogNumber:
36189

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Rachel Portman   Primary Artist
Mark Rubin   String Bass
Rob Schwimmer   Piano
Aaron Alexander   Drums
Steve Schwelling   Drums
Michael Kosarin   Conductor
Gwyneth Paltrow   Vocals
George Carver   Guitar

Technical Credits

Hank Ballard   Composer
Charles Aznavour   Composer
Emmanuel Chamboredon   Executive Producer
Hal David   Composer
Sherman Edwards & Donald Meyer   Composer
Harlan Howard   Composer
Richard King   Engineer
Cole Porter   Composer
Rachel Portman   Composer,Orchestration,Score Producer
Mark Rubin   Arranger,Producer
Rob Schwimmer   Arranger
Aaron Alexander   Arranger
Jeff Atmajian   Orchestration
Herbert Kretzmer   Composer
Ian P. Hierons   Executive Producer
John Klenner   Composer
Jodi Tack   Art Direction
Chris Cozens   Auricle Programming
Debi Streeter   Music Administrator

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Infamous 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rachel Portman is a gifted composer and an even finer craftsman of working through film scores to find just the right touches to serve the story well. Her credits are rather staggering: her film scores include 'Chocolat', 'Emma', 'The Human Stain', 'Nicholas Nickleby', 'The Little Prince', 'The Cider House Rules', 'The Manchurian Candidate', 'Benny and Joon', 'Miss Potter', etc - scores that touch almost every period of music. INFAMOUS requires a score that can muster the sense of glamour of New York and also find the essence of Kansas, traveling the gamut between the flamboyance of Truman Capote's cavorting with his famous friends to narrowing down Capote's dissolution at the hanging of Perry Smith. Portman does it all with aplomb. The soundtrack CD includes that magical moment of Gweneth Paltrow singing in a club at the beginning of the film, and Daniel Craig's simple guitar song he croons on a tape for Capote - a rendition all the more touching because of its honesty in allowing a non-singer to render the song instead of lip synching a pro's voice. But for this listener the treasures of this CD are Portman's compositions for chamber ensemble and duets for oddly paired instruments that haunt the atmosphere of suspense and thwarted love in the rainy night of the Kansas execution. This is an album that bears close attention as an example of just how important fine music is to the overall success of a film. Grady Harp