Infamy

Infamy

5.0 4
by Mobb Deep
     
 

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Mobb Deep have kept diehards hooked on gritty ghetto reality rhymes since they dropped the hip-hop classic "Shook Ones, Pt. II," back in '95, and their 2001 full-length, Infamy, is sure to keep heads noddin'. Prodigy and Havoc will always represent for the underground, but after '99's hit single, "…  See more details below

Overview

Mobb Deep have kept diehards hooked on gritty ghetto reality rhymes since they dropped the hip-hop classic "Shook Ones, Pt. II," back in '95, and their 2001 full-length, Infamy, is sure to keep heads noddin'. Prodigy and Havoc will always represent for the underground, but after '99's hit single, "Quiet Storm," paved their way from the streets into the clubs, Mobb Deep have embraced the urban mainstream. Bad Boy's R&B princes, 112, lace the chorus of "Hey Luv (Anything)," which may be Mobb Deep's biggest hit yet, while Dr. Dre's right-hand man, Scott Storch, supplies the G-funk on the radio-friendly "Live Foul." But don't fret, there are still plenty of street-credible classics, complete with signature Queensbridge slang and hypnotic beats. "The Learning (Burn)" is one of the best, with Havoc dropping cryptic lyrics such as, "On your team I pull the curtain of beautiful hurtin'." Meanwhile, "Crawling" spoofs P. Diddy's "Bad Boy for Life," and Prodigy addresses Mobb's well-publicized beef with Jay-Z, asking, "How you not gonna show face after that stunt at rap's only awards?" in reference to a dispute between MD and Jigga at the 2001 Source Awards. Once again, the Infamous don't disappoint, and if you were already a fan, here's another gem. Ryan Crosby

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Jason Birchmeier
Long considered New York's most rugged and hardcore rap group of the '90s to ever make it big, Mobb Deep finally soften up a bit on Infamy. The album is a turning point for Prodigy and Havoc -- and a timely one indeed. Shortly before Infamy hit the streets, Jay-Z had blasted Mobb Deep -- as well as Nas -- on "Takeover," berating Prodigy in particular for being fake. Nas fired back on his Stillmatic album with the cutting song "Ether"; Mobb Deep didn't. Instead, the Queensbridge duo went about their business and released Infamy, their most accessible album yet -- the sort of album many fans never would have expected. Granted, Mobb Deep still rep the street life here, as songs such as "Kill That Nigga," "My Gats Spitting," and "Hurt Niggas" no doubt illustrate. However, songs such as "Pray for Me," "Hey Luv (Anything)," and "There I Go Again" sent quite a different message; the first features Lil' Mo, the second 112, and the third Ron Isley -- each there to smooth out Mobb Deep's rough sound. And it works, particularly in the case of the thug ballad "Hey Luv (Anything)," which garnered the most exposure the duo had yet experienced and introduced Mobb Deep to a broader audience.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/30/2001
Label:
Epic Europe
UPC:
5099750164228
catalogNumber:
501642
Rank:
64973

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Mobb Deep   Primary Artist
Johnson Sisters   Background Vocals
Chucky Thompson   Strings
Infamous Mobb   Track Performer
Littles   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Mobb Deep   Executive Producer
Scott Spencer Storch   Producer
Havoc   Producer
Oscar Monsalve   Engineer
Steve Sola   Engineer
Alchemist   Producer
Ez Elpee   Producer
Sheldon Guide   Engineer
Jonathan "Lighty" Williams   Engineer,Executive Producer
Chris Feldmann   Art Direction
Will Kennedy   Imaging

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Customer Reviews

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Infamy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this Mobb Deep album is a classic. This group is the most realist MC's out there. This album represents how Prodigy and Havoc can hold it down with or without special guest. There production is great. Always hitting us with hardcore beats that don't make you wanna dance, just nod your head and make you listen to what they're saying. I very much enjoyed this album.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was really excited to see how ¿Infamy¿ would live up to their first commercially successful album. The CD starts off with ¿Pray for Me¿, which has that real grimey feel and paints a pictures of what is to come about on the rest of the album. The album continues with its street feel until you get to ¿Hey Luv¿. Hey Luv is rap love ballad that features the smoothed out voices of 112. 112 does not take away from Mobb Deep¿s street sound, rather they compliment the sound making the song one of the best on the albums. ¿Burn¿, which features Vita and Big Noyd is probably the hottest track on the album. Once the song begins your head will automatically start to nod due to rugged baseline and funky guitar rip. ¿Get Away¿ gives a true example of growing up in Queensbridge shaped into the individuals that they are. Overall, ¿Infamy¿ is tight CD that is worth the purchase, especially if one is fan of the group. The CD vividly details the growth of the group, while maintaining that street sound which made them so popular.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Man this is a smoker hear. It is hot. This is the best one MD. From start to finish it keeps your head bobbin. I always have been a fan, and with this one I will remain a fan 4life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mobb Deep is one of my favorite rappers, the most hottest song is get away.