Infectious Diseases in Critical Care Medicine / Edition 3

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Overview

A clinically focused overview of infectious disease and critical care medicine.

The Third Edition of Infectious Disease in Critical Care Medicine presents clear diagnostic methods, strategies, and knowledge on antimicrobials crucial to avoiding complications and ensuring patient recovery in the CCU.

Comprehensive yet succinct, this source discusses all clinical infectious diseases from pneumonia and empyema to central nervous system and antibiotic-related infections.

Highlights include:


  • the latest research on MRSA and VRE
  • 100 high quality illustrations
  • four new chapters on:


    • military TB
    • infections related to immunosuppressive immunomodulating agents
    • therapy for MRSA and VRE
    • therapy for MDR klebsiella, pseudomonas, and aceinetobacter

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Ahmad Nusair, MD (Marshall University School of Medicine)
Description: Updating the edition published three years earlier, this book tackles the most commonly encountered infectious processes in the intensive care setting. It provides clinicians with guidance to recognize and treat infections in the ICU while differentiating them from their noninfectious mimics.
Purpose: The book aims to present the most up-to-date knowledge in the field of infectious diseases in the critical care setting. There is no doubt that such information is much needed in this era of heightened awareness of the need to prevent nosocomial infections, identify infections promptly, use antimicrobials judiciously, and, hence, improve clinical outcomes.
Audience: Like the author, who is a renowned authority in infectious diseases in critical care settings, I believe that this book is a great resource for a wide spectrum of clinicians, including residents and fellows (medical and surgical) and attending physicians who have critical care responsibilities (including intensivists, pulmonologists, infectious diseases specialists, surgeons, neurologists).
Features: The book is well organized and encompasses most aspects of infectious diseases in the critical care setting. Among the topics it covers are fever in the ICU (infectious and noninfectious etiologies), specific organ-system related infections and their mimics, specific pathogens and the spectrum of the disease they cause in critically ill patients with an emphasis on multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs), infections in specific patient populations (alcoholic, immunocompromised, or organ transplant), and the proper use of antimicrobials. The tables are particularly useful and easy to read. It would have been more efficient if the book just referenced the tables instead of repeating the same information in the text. Despite the fact that some pictures are of poor quality, they are useful. Among the outstanding chapters are the ones on the causes of fever in the ICU and pneumonia. Managing infections in the ICU is a multidisciplinary process and entails therapeutic interventions not limited to the use of antibiotics, but some chapters fail to address such interventions. For example, in the chapter on sepsis, the author didn't allude to use of steroids and pressors. Some recommendations give the impression that certain issues can be tackled only through one strategy. For example, if a central venous catheter-related blood stream infection is suspected, the catheter should be removed and the tip should be cultured. While that may be the ideal approach, other reasonable methods can be as effective, such as the use of the differential time concept.
Assessment: As an infectious disease specialist who is enroute to specializing in critical care medicine, I found this an excellent resource, both comprehensive and useful. This third edition has expanded its spectrum to include emerging infectious diseases issues. It will be particularly useful for critical care physicians, since critical care books don't give infections their due. For example, The ICU Book, 3rd edition, Marino (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007), devotes fewer than one-tenth of its pages to review only major infectious processes, and doesn't tackle crucially important issues such as fever in the ICU or mimics of infection.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Ahmad Nusair, MD(Marshall University School of Medicine)
Description: Updating the edition published three years earlier, this book tackles the most commonly encountered infectious processes in the intensive care setting. It provides clinicians with guidance to recognize and treat infections in the ICU while differentiating them from their noninfectious mimics.
Purpose: The book aims to present the most up-to-date knowledge in the field of infectious diseases in the critical care setting. There is no doubt that such information is much needed in this era of heightened awareness of the need to prevent nosocomial infections, identify infections promptly, use antimicrobials judiciously, and, hence, improve clinical outcomes.
Audience: Like the author, who is a renowned authority in infectious diseases in critical care settings, I believe that this book is a great resource for a wide spectrum of clinicians, including residents and fellows (medical and surgical) and attending physicians who have critical care responsibilities (including intensivists, pulmonologists, infectious diseases specialists, surgeons, neurologists).
Features: The book is well organized and encompasses most aspects of infectious diseases in the critical care setting. Among the topics it covers are fever in the ICU (infectious and noninfectious etiologies), specific organ-system related infections and their mimics, specific pathogens and the spectrum of the disease they cause in critically ill patients with an emphasis on multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs), infections in specific patient populations (alcoholic, immunocompromised, or organ transplant), and the proper use of antimicrobials. The tables are particularly useful and easy to read. It would have been more efficient if the book just referenced the tables instead of repeating the same information in the text. Despite the fact that some pictures are of poor quality, they are useful. Among the outstanding chapters are the ones on the causes of fever in the ICU and pneumonia. Managing infections in the ICU is a multidisciplinary process and entails therapeutic interventions not limited to the use of antibiotics, but some chapters fail to address such interventions. For example, in the chapter on sepsis, the author didn't allude to use of steroids and pressors. Some recommendations give the impression that certain issues can be tackled only through one strategy. For example, if a central venous catheter-related blood stream infection is suspected, the catheter should be removed and the tip should be cultured. While that may be the ideal approach, other reasonable methods can be as effective, such as the use of the differential time concept.
Assessment: As an infectious disease specialist who is enroute to specializing in critical care medicine, I found this an excellent resource, both comprehensive and useful. This third edition has expanded its spectrum to include emerging infectious diseases issues. It will be particularly useful for critical care physicians, since critical care books don't give infections their due. For example, The ICU Book, 3rd edition, Marino (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007), devotes fewer than one-tenth of its pages to review only major infectious processes, and doesn't tackle crucially important issues such as fever in the ICU or mimics of infection.
David J. Dries
This multiauthored text focuses on infectious considerations in the critical care unit. The editor emphasizes aspects of infectious disease pertinent to critical care that are not given appropriate emphasis in standard textbooks of critical care medicine. Senior trainees and practitioners in critical care medicine will benefit from this work. The infectious disease consultant working in the ICU will also enjoy the perspective presented here. The editor and contributors represent an international group of infectious disease specialists located in the Northeast United States and Western Europe. General concepts including the differential diagnosis and laboratory principles in infectious disease are discussed initially. The second section, comprising fully half of the book, describes infections typical to organs which fail, bringing patients to the critical care unit. Infection is not an isolated entity, so other organ system considerations in the critical care patient are discussed in the third section. Therapeutic considerations are discussed in the final several chapters including pharmacokinetics, drug usage and antibiotic resistance. Illustrations are black and white and reproduce well. An adequate reference list is supplied with each chapter. Currency of references varies among chapters. Twenty pages are given to a detailed index. The editor correctly notes that the essential problem of infection in the intensive care unit is diagnosis rather than therapy. This book is unique in that it emphasizes the evaluation of infection, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the critical care unit. Increased emphasis on infection in high risk surgical groups and some colorillustrations will increase the appeal of this work.
New England Journal of Medicine
...is appropriate for the bookshelves of all physicians with the privilege of caring for critically ill patients.
New England Journal of Medicine
In the setting of an aging population of patients with a growing number of coexisting illnesses and with the increased ability of medical personnel to provide cardiopulmonary supportive care, the importance of infectious diseases in the intensive care unit will increase. Infectious Diseases in Critical Care Medicine, by filling a gap in the literature and compiling selected critical reviews, is appropriate for the bookshelves of all physicians with the privilege of caring for critically ill patients.
Booknews
Provides practical information on infectious diseases in the critical care setting, for critical care practitioners regardless of specialty. Section I deals with general concepts of infectious diseases in the critical care unit (CCU), and Section II discusses infectious diseases on the basis of clinical syndromes. Section II examines specific infectious disease problems, and Section IV covers therapeutic considerations in critical care patients. Emphasis is on differential diagnosis rather than therapy, with material on various mimics of infectious diseases. Useful features include a review of optimal use of lab tests, and information on specific subpopulations. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781420092400
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 10/28/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 576
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Table of Contents

PART I: DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH IN CRITICAL CARE
Clinical Approach to Fever in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Fever and Rash in Critical Care, Lee S. Engel, Charles V. Sanders, and Fred A. Lopez
Physical Exam Clues to Infectious Diseases and Their Mimics in Critical Care, Yehia Y. Mishriki
Ophthalmologic Clues to Infectious Diseases and Their Mimics in Critical Care, Cheston B. Cunha, Michael J. Wilkinson, and David A. Quillen
Radiology of Infectious Diseases and Their Mimics in Critical Care, Jocelyn A. Luongo, Orlando A. Ortiz, and Douglas S. Katz
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci Colonization and Infection in the Critical Care Unit, C. Glen Mayhall

PART II: CLINICAL SYNDROMES IN CRITICAL CARE
Clinical Approach to Sepsis and Its Mimics in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Meningitis and Its Mimics in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha and Leon Smith
Encephalitis and Its Mimics in Critical Care, John J. Halperin
Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Nosocomial Pneumonia in Critical Care, Emilio Bouza and Almudena Burillo
Intravenous Central Line Infections in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Infective Endocarditis and Its Mimics in Critical Care, John L. Brusch
Intra-abdominal Surgical Infections and Their Mimics in Critical Care, Samuel E. Wilson
Clostridium difficile Infection in Critical Care, Karin I. Hjalmarson and Sherwood L. Gorbach
Urosepsis in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Severe Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in Critical Care, Mamta Sharma and Louis D. Saravolatz

PART III: DIFFICULT DIAGNOSTIC PROBLEMS IN CRITICAL CARE
Tropical Infections in Critical Care, MAJ Robert Wood-Morris, LTC Michael Zapor, David R. Tribble, and Kenneth F. Wagner
Infections in Cirrhosis in Critical Care, Laurel C. Preheim
Severe Infections in Asplenic Patients in Critical Care, Mohammed S. Ahmed and Nancy Khardori
Infections in Burns in Critical Care, Steven E. Wolf, Basil A. Pruitt, Jr., and Seung H. Kim
Infections Related to Steroids in Immunosuppressive/Immunomodulating Agents in Critical Care, Lesley Ann Saketkoo and Luis R. Espinoza
Infections in Organ Transplants in Critical Care, Patricia Mun╦ťoz, Almudena Burillo, and Emilio Bouza
Miliary Tuberculosis in Critical Care, Helmut Albrecht
Bioterrorism Infections in Critical Care, Dennis J. Cleri, Anthony J. Ricketti, and John R. Vernaleo

PART IV: ANTIMICROBIAL THERAPY
Selection of Antibiotics in Critical Care, Divya Ahuja, Benjamin B. Britt, and Charles S. Bryan
Antimicrobial Therapy of VRE and MRSA in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Antibiotic Therapy of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Antibiotic Kinetics in the Febrile Multiple-System Trauma Patient in Critical Care, Donald E. Fry
Antibiotic Therapy in the Penicillin Allergic Patient in Critical Care, Burke A. Cunha
Adverse Reactions to Antibiotics in Critical Care, Eric V. Granowitz and Richard B. Brown
Index

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