Infernal (Repairman Jack Series #9)

( 15 )

Overview

The ninth Repairman Jack novel brims with murder, international terrorism, sibling rivalry, and a truly infernal device. A mutual tragedy throws Jack together with his brother Tom, a judge from Philadelphia. They've never been close, and it doesn't take Jack long realize that's a good thing. Tom and he are opposites.

Still, Tom convinces Jack to go on a trip to get to know each other better. He has a map locating a wreck off the coast of Bermuda and wants Jack to help him find ...

See more details below
This (Unabridged) is Not Available through BN.com
Infernal (Repairman Jack Series #9)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$7.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

The ninth Repairman Jack novel brims with murder, international terrorism, sibling rivalry, and a truly infernal device. A mutual tragedy throws Jack together with his brother Tom, a judge from Philadelphia. They've never been close, and it doesn't take Jack long realize that's a good thing. Tom and he are opposites.

Still, Tom convinces Jack to go on a trip to get to know each other better. He has a map locating a wreck off the coast of Bermuda and wants Jack to help him find it. Reluctantly Jack agrees. But instead of treasure they find a strange object, part organic, part manmade, known as the Lilitongue of Gefreda. Ancient lore claims that it is a means "to elude all enemies and leave them helpless." The big question is, why does Tom want such a thing?

And if the Lilitongue lives up to the legend, where does it take you? No one seems to know. Matters take a bizarre and dangerous turn-no surprise for a Repairman Jack novel--when someone accidentally activates the Lilitongue.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In Wilson's well-wrought ninth Repairman Jack novel (after 2004's Crisscross), the off-the-books fix-it man, urban vigilante and paranormal adventurer reconnects with his estranged brother, Tom, after their father is gunned down in a terrorist attack at La Guardia Airport. Tom, a corrupt Philadelphia judge who's fleeing the law and rapidly running out of money, persuades Jack to help him look for the wreckage of a Spanish treasure ship that sank in 1598 off Bermuda. Instead of treasure, however, the brothers haul up an odd, skin-covered, oblong object known as the Lilitongue of Gefreda. It looks harmless enough, but research tells them that those who come in contact with it vanish to the "Otherness." The plot moves briskly but never recklessly, the dialogue is salty and witty, and the characters have enough dimension to elevate them above the genre pack. Jack, introduced more than 20 years ago, is aging gracefully. Agent, Al Zukerman at Writers House. (Nov.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Anonymous hero goes through some family issues, recovers treasure, fights terrorism. Repairman Jack lives off the grid under an assumed name and does a lot of off-the-books "repair" work, through exactly how and why is not spelled out in Wilson's ninth entry in the series (Crisscross, 2004, etc.). Jack, who has a nice little Manhattan life going with the lovely Gia and doesn't want more complications than his shady work already offers, is awaiting the arrival of his retiree father, who's flying up from Florida for some quality family time. But a terrorist attack at LaGuardia leaves Jack's father dead and Jack scouring his network of reprobate acquaintances to find out who was behind the attack. His father's funeral brings Jack into unwilling contact with his brother Tom, a Philadelphia judge who-with his ex-wives, drug and alcohol problems and extremely lax attitude about bribes-is an even less upstanding character than Jack. Tom ropes Jack into taking a ride on a boat to Bermuda in order to withdraw some funds that Tom had stashed away in a bank there. Along the way-just maybe-they'll look for lost Spanish treasure marked on a map that fell into Tom's hands. Then it's back to New York, where they need to deal with those terrorists. Some things work (especially the well-rendered brotherly relationship), but a lot (such as Jack's joyfully racist mafioso buddy Joey) fails to connect.
Hellnotes

"Highly recommended."
Detroit News and Free Press

"Entertaining and offers enough leads backward to intrigue readers who are just meeting Jack. Wilson has a winner with Jack."
Atlas Magazine

"Infernal blasts into action with a (literally) shocking bang that thuds into your chest like a high-caliber bullet."
Booklist

"A worthy addition to the Repairman Jack series."
From the Publisher

"Repairman Jack, the fix-it man who deals in the marginally supernatural, return in another out-of-this-world adventure. . . .Naturally, things get very weird very fast, and in no time Jack must summon all of his skills to escape certain death. A worthy addition to the Repairman Jack series." --Booklist on Infernal

"A lot of fun. . . .Entertaining and offers enough leads backward to intrigue readers who are just meeting Jack. Wilson has a winner with Jack." -Detroit News and Free Press, Philadelphia Inquirer, Montgomery Advertiser

"The latest Repairman Jack novel by F. Paul Wilson, Infernal, blasts into action with a (literally) shocking bang that thuds into your chest like a high-caliber bullet." -Atlas Magazine

"Though Infernal is part of an ongoing cycle, the tyro should have no trouble reading this as a stand-alone; there are some references to past events, but nothing ruinous. And after closing this book, those new to Jack, or even those who have been out of touch for a while, will probably want to read all the novels they've missed. Highly recommended." -Hellnotes

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781469267333
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 7/28/2013
  • Series: Repairman Jack Series , #9
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

F. Paul Wilson is the New York Times bestselling author of the Repairman Jack novels and winner of the Horror Writers Association Lifetime Achievement Award. He lives in Wall, New Jersey.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 15 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2006

    Repairman Jack Lite

    Disappointing. I had eagerly looked forward to the newest entry in the Repairman Jack series. However, once I began reading it, I sensed what had happened in other book series(by other writers) was now happening in this one. I call this malady the 'Lite-ening' up of the plots and main character. The stories gets less complex and seem to be written by a computer program. At first glance, all the elements that appeared in the earlier stories are there, but when the reader is finished, he doesn't feel satisfied. Like I said - 'Lite'. Then, there is the 'Lite-ening' of the character, Repairman Jack. Mr. Wilson has now almost totally domesticated Jack. The presence of a girl friend and her daughter used to be merely a distraction. In this story, they have become central characters. The readers understand that Jack is basically a good guy. We don't need to be reminded every other page of his capacity to love. A character like Jack works better as a disaffected urban loner. Giving him an almost sickeningly sweet domestic life takes his character in way the wrong direction. This is what should happen in the last book of the series. Another book like this one and it may BE the last, at least for me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Great Repairman Jack

    At La Guardia, a terrorist kills the father of Repairman Jack. That would be enough to cause most souls woes, but the murder of his father causes the non-existent Jack worse troubles as his estranged brother Tom, a corrupt Philadelphia judge on the lam and disparately needing money, persuades Jack that they should go on a trip together. Though he knows better after spending his salad years with his odious sibling, Jack agrees. Tom could not care less if he ever sees Jack again once their trek is over in fact he plans to insure that he never sees Jack again. Tom has an oceanic map that shows the location of a Spanish treasure ship that sunk off of Bermuda in 1598 he expects Jack to retrieve it. However, instead of booty, Jack and Tom haul up a weird skin covered object, the Lilitongue of Gefreda that the ancients claim enables a person to evade their enemies, but leaves the ¿user¿ inside of the ¿Otherness¿. Not trusting his sibling, Jack believes this object was what Tom sought, but why eludes the Repairman who plans to find out one way or another. Repairman Jack is at his refreshing best in his ninth adventure as fans receive a close look at family members, somewhat less his dad as compared with his loathsome brother. The story line is action packed from the opening scene at the airport to the high seas and to the activation of the device. Readers will appreciate F. Paul Wilson¿s latest caper starring one of the great literary legends of the past decade or so. Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 10, 2013

    I did not think this was going to be that good. The opening was

    I did not think this was going to be that good. The opening was so good that I thought it was be just like "Legacies" (both had an amazing opening). But not this one. Keep reading it. This was pretty crazy. Great ending. You'll start reading this book and you won't want to put it down by the 200 mark. Such an incredible story. Gotta read it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 8, 2013

    Good, not great (possible spoilers included)

    This one felt a bit like "Star Trek 3: The Search for Spook", sort of a chapter that fills in a bit of background without doing much else. It was interesting "meeting" Jack's brother, albeit briefly, although I was shocked to see what happened to Jack's Father after having "met" him in Gateways. A good episode for the RJ series that sets up "Harbingers" well. As others have mentioned, don't read these out of order.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2005

    Another Great Work by F. Paul Wilson

    Fans of Jack have come to recognize his stories as a mix of action, suspense, deception, and intrigue. However this story takes a different approach, where there isn't the usual amount of gunplay, hand to hand, and grifting, there is no shortage of suspense, deception, and intrigue. The first half of the story is a treasure hunt between two estranged brothers who'd rather have a root canal preformed without the aid of anesthesia than be together, while the other half is sort of countdown to doom. While the clock ticks away you find yourself turning each page wondering what will happen to Jack and his loved ones and how he will figure a way out of this one. Wilson goes back to an old formula that he hasn't used since 'The Tomb' where he takes you back in time, if only for a few pages, to give you a bit of background to a very important part of the story. I personally couldn't put the book down, and kept trying to figure out what the final chapter would bring. Those who read this will not be disappointed, but it isn't a book that newcomers to the Repairman Jack series should read first. With this particular series, it's best to start at the beginning and evolve with Jack.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 15 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)