Inferno (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

( 1950 )
Hardcover (Library Binding - THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY)
$18.52
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$20.85 List Price
Inferno

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780606361668
  • Publisher: Sanval, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/6/2014
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
  • Pages: 611
  • Product dimensions: 4.25 (w) x 7.75 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Dan Brown
Dan Brown
Dan Brown is the author of numerous thrillers, including The Da Vinci Code -- one of the biggest literary bestsellers of all time.

Biography

Novelist Dan Brown may not have invented the literary thriller, but his groundbreaking tour de force The Da Vinci Code -- with its irresistible mix of religion, history, art, and science -- is the gold standard for a flourishing genre.

Born in Exeter, New Hampshire in 1964, Brown attended Phillips Exeter Academy (where his father taught), and graduated from Amherst with a double major in Spanish and English. After college he supported himself through teaching and enjoyed moderate success as a musician and songwriter.

Brown credits Sidney Sheldon with jump-starting his literary career. Up until 1994, his reading tastes were focused sharply on the classics. Then, on vacation in Tahiti, he stumbled on a paperback copy of Sheldon's novel The Doomsday Conspiracy. By the time he finished the book, he had decided he could do as well. There and then, he determined to try his hand at writing. His first attempt was a pseudonymously written self-help book for women co-written with his future wife Blythe Newlon. Then, in 1998, he published his first novel, Digital Fortress -- followed in swift succession by Angels and Demons and Deception Point. None the three achieved commercial success.

Then, in 2003, Brown hit the jackpot with his fourth novel, a compulsively readable thriller about a Harvard symbologist named Robert Langdon who stumbles on an ancient conspiracy in the wake of a shocking murder in the Louvre. Combining elements from art, science, and religion, The Da Vinci Code became the biggest bestseller in publishing history, inspiring a big-budget movie adaptation and fueling interest in the author's back list. In 2009, Brown continued Robert Langdon's esoteric adventures with The Lost Symbol, a tale of intrigue that, like its predecessors, takes readers on a wild ride into the sinister mysteries of the past.

Good To Know

  • Brown revealed the inspiration for his labyrinthine thriller during a writer's address in Concord, New Hampshire. "I was studying art history at the University of Seville (in Spain), and one morning our professor started class in a most unusual way. He showed us a slide of Da Vinci's famous painting "The Last Supper"... I had seen the painting many times, yet somehow I had never seen the strange anomalies that the professor began pointing out: a hand clutching a dagger, a disciple making a threatening gesture across the neck of another... and much to my surprise, a very obvious omission, the apparent absence on the table of the cup of Christ... The one physical object that in many ways defines that moment in history, Leonardo Da Vinci chose to omit." According to Brown, this reintroduction to an ancient masterpiece was merely "the tip of the ice burg." What followed was an in-depth explanation of clues apparent in Da Vinci's painting and his association with the Priory of Sion that set Brown on a path toward bringing The Da Vinci Code into existence.

  • If only all writers could enjoy this kind of success: in early 2004, all four of Brown's novels were on the New York Times Bestseller List in a single week!

    In our interview with Brown, he shared some of his writing rituals:

    "If I'm not at my desk by 4:00 a.m., I feel like I'm missing my most productive hours. In addition to starting early, I keep an antique hourglass on my desk and every hour break briefly to do push-ups, sit-ups, and some quick stretches. I find this helps keep the blood -- and ideas -- flowing.

    "I'm also a big fan of gravity boots. Hanging upside down seems to help me solve plot challenges by shifting my entire perspective."

  • Read More Show Less
      1. Hometown:
        New England
      1. Date of Birth:
        June 22, 1964
      2. Place of Birth:
        Exeter, New Hampshire
      1. Education:
        Phillips Exeter Academy 1982; B.A., Amherst College, 1986; University of Seville, Spain
      2. Website:

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4
    ( 1950 )
    Rating Distribution

    5 Star

    (836)

    4 Star

    (451)

    3 Star

    (339)

    2 Star

    (193)

    1 Star

    (131)

    Your Rating:

    Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

    Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

    Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

    Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

    We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

    What to exclude from your review:

    Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

    Reviews should not contain any of the following:

    • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
    • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
    • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
    • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
    • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
    • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
    • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

    Reminder:

    • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
    • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
    • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
    Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

    Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

    Create a Pen Name

    Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

     
    Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

    Continue Anonymously
    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1950 Customer Reviews
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 16, 2013

      It was ok, but not his best.

      I am a huge Dan Brown fan, and I always look forward to reading his new books; however, this particular one was hard to get through. Normally I can't put one of his books down, and I fly through it. But this time I had to talk myself into finishing it. I think he went a little overboard on details. Events didn't seem to smoothly relate to each other. And the plot was both far fetched (even more than usual) and stale at the same time. Some of his tricks and twists have been used one time too many, and towards the end of the book I felt like he was throwing in too many twists just for the sake of it,to the point where it became convoluted and had me rolling my eyes.

      With all that said, I still enjoyed some things. I like how Langdon had amnesia in the very first chapter, and therefore had to work backwards to piece things together. That was a fresh idea of Dan Brown's. I just wish the rest of the book was just as fresh. It wasn't terrible, but it didn't leave me at the edge of my seat, biting my nails, like some of his previous books.

      153 out of 164 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 16, 2013

      A work of fun fiction.

      Dan Brown catches a lot of grief for the historical accuracy of his novels, but that is exactly the reason why they are under fiction. Any smart author blends fact with fiction. For all of you who don't get that, do you ever wonder why the Flintstones wasn't considered a reality show destined for The History Channel?

      Sometimes things are just for fun.

      114 out of 140 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 14, 2013

      I found the book enjoyable. As I do with his other stories. I re

      I found the book enjoyable. As I do with his other stories. I read them for entertainment and not as a definitive answer to religion so please try not to characterize every one that reads it as ignorant.

      102 out of 121 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted May 17, 2013

      more from this reviewer

      Inferno by Dan Brown If you liked The Da Vinci Code, you'll lov

      Inferno by Dan Brown

      If you liked The Da Vinci Code, you'll love Inferno.

      Robert Langdon wakes up in a hospital in Florence not remembering how he got there. Last thing he remembers, he was walking to a lecture where he teaches symbology at Harvard University in Boston.

      He's told he's been shot, and his attacker has another attempt on his life; killing one of the physicians who was treating him. Sienna Brooks, a young female physician rescues him and they must soon evade both the US government and a sinister looking set of agents led by agent Cristoph Brüler.

      Langdon and Brooks outsmart all of these people to uncover that there is a virus that is going to be released by the renown biochemist billionaire, Bertrand Zobrist. Zobrist is a firm believer of Malthusian catastrophe - "The power of population is so superior to the power of the earth to produce subsistence for man, that premature death must in some shape or other visit the human race. The vices of mankind are active and able ministers of depopulation. They are the precursors in the great army of destruction, and often finish the dreadful work themselves. But should they fail in this war of extermination, sickly seasons, epidemics, pestilence, and plague advance in terrific array, and sweep off their thousands and tens of thousands. Should success be still incomplete, gigantic inevitable famine stalks in the rear, and with one mighty blow levels the population with the food of the world." To avoid this "Inferno," Zobrist has decided to take matters in his hand and reduce the world's population.

      Deep beneath Dante's Inferno lies clues that will lead Langdon, Dr. Brooks, the Consortium - a powerful organization that is for hire, and Dr. Elizabeth Sinskey - the head of the World Health Organization - to the place where the virus is being released. The reader is exposed to quite accurate descriptions of Florence, Venice, and Istanbul as the plot thickens, twists, and is finally revealed to the tune of Liszt' Dante symphony at the Istanbul ancient cisterns - which I'm listening as I write this.

      The book is a well researched novel. The twists and turns are incredible; it's a page turner. Couldn't put it down, read it in two days. I found myself searching for maps of Florence, Venice, and Istanbul to follow Langdon's quest. In the end, I had to listen to Liszt' Dante symphony to read the climactic conclusion: "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here," for once you open its pages, you'll be trapped in this fascinating tale, and you will also be re-examining what you thought of Dante's work.....

      67 out of 94 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted May 19, 2013

      Admittedly, I was hesitent to read this book because Dan Brown h

      Admittedly, I was hesitent to read this book because Dan Brown has become the author we love to find fault with and his novels, to a degree, have become formulaic. After reading The Lost Symbol, I thought that perhaps it was time to stop following this series. I was wrong.

      Yes, this one follows that same formula (a successful one, I may add), but I was completely engrossed in this story and found that the outside world simply vanished. Dan Brown's prose has improved, and he once again finds a way to weave history, science, art, geography etc. into a facininating thriller. That, and he at least gets you to think about a real-word issue (human population), regardless of whether or not you agree with what his view is.

      I should have seen some of the twists that were coming, but I didn't, and the ending was not what I expected at all. This is a story I expect will resonate with me for quite a while!

      55 out of 61 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 20, 2013

      Loved many of Dan Brown's previous books and looked forward to t

      Loved many of Dan Brown's previous books and looked forward to this one with great anticipation. What a let-down. It's nothing more than an art history travelogue thrown in with cliff notes for Dante's Inferno, surrounding a mystery that is definitely not heart pounding. As Langdon "dashes" from one traumatic event to the next he spends an inordinated amount of time (pages and pages) admiring architecture, design and the various stunning art pieces of past centuries. All this book did for me was to make me want to call my travel agent.

      48 out of 53 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted May 18, 2013

      I eagerly awaited this book, as I do all of Brown's novels. Half

      I eagerly awaited this book, as I do all of Brown's novels. Halfway through, I was convinced the author left the writing to an underling. The lack of an editor was glaring... characters' descriptions were just laughable. If I had read one more time "the man in designer sunglasses, itching his neck" I would have thrown the book against a wall. Words don't describe my disappointment... had to force myself to read the second half, and then only so that I wouldn't feel so cheated out of my money. Oddly enough, this week's 'People' magazine had a piece on Brown's house... how cleverly he had devised hidden doors and clues. If he had spent half the time on his manuscript that he used coming up with house decor, 'Inferno' wouldn't be such a mess. Never dreamed I'd be giving Dan Brown two stars.

      40 out of 43 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 17, 2013

      Dull

      Reads like a travel essay of florence. Action is continually interupted with langdon's thought commentaries on the art or architecture. No edge of your seat tension on my part. In spite of the book's plot l was rather bored by it. Also picturing tom hanks as langdon doesn't work for me! Dan brown is more name than talent.

      29 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 15, 2013

      LOVED IT!

      It was fantastic beginning to end. I loved that even when you thought you had figured it out everything changed again. Loved every minute!

      27 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 18, 2013

      Not his best...

      Having a hard time getting into this one. Doesn't seem to have the tension of his other books. So far it's just one big chase scene with lots of riddles and trivia. Maybe his formula is wearing thin?

      25 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 15, 2013

      Good, but not as good as his others.

      I likedthis book, but at times it was very confusing. I felt like I was blindfolded and riding a rollercoaster...just this absolute feeling of disorientation. It did get better towards the middle, but getting there was...rough. Definitely wasn't able to put it down. I think his other books are more engrossing, and the plot twists are easier to follow. These gave me whiplash.

      19 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 16, 2013

      Worth the wait

      OMG... I have to re read again with Google, first to brush up on my Italian and THEN... go to the places on the map to see the art....and the story was not that bad.... cant wait for the movie.... again, worth the wait...

      17 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 26, 2013

      Terrible disappointment after his other books. I found that not

      Terrible disappointment after his other books. I found that not only did I not care about the characters in the book, I also was skipping portions of the book to get to the end. It was one of the books that I finished because I had started it. The book tends to balance between an academic travelogue of Florence and other historical sites and a ongoing lecture about the imminent dangers caused by overpopulation.

      15 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted May 16, 2013

      more from this reviewer

      Typical Dan Brown, same blueprint as the Da Vinci Code. Fast pac

      Typical Dan Brown, same blueprint as the Da Vinci Code. Fast pace thriller with some historical facts and a puzzle to be solved. A highly entertaining read.

      13 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 21, 2013

      Interesting premise but fell flat for me

      I found the premise interesting but got bogged down in all the traveloge type narration about the locations. I have read several book lately where the author keeps repeating the same details throughout the book. For example what the character experienced in the past or events from earlier in the book. The book was no exception. The repetition began to feel like filler. I kept thinking I got it the first time, move on.

      12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted June 6, 2013

      I was looking forward to this book for a long time and boy was I

      I was looking forward to this book for a long time and boy was I disappointed. I went to art school and the art history teachers made art history more exciting then this book. It reads like a tour guides book to Florence, done as a car chase. It kind of reminds me of the old movie if its Tues day it must be Belguim. There is no great concept in this book for the mytery part either, just another doomsday story which if you read his other books is the pattern. It seems to me Da Vinci code may have been his one hit wonder because this is a major disappointment, I have had to force myself to finish the book and others I have talked to have said the same thing just a boring chase book with so much repetition that I just began to skim over the pages were it began getting to me. I know Dante was expelled from Florence but how many times does Brown need to remind us after the 10 th time I got the message Dante was expelled okay already.

      10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Posted May 20, 2013

      One long chase scene. Not anywhere as interesting as the DaVinc

      One long chase scene.
      Not anywhere as interesting as the DaVinci code.
      Maybe I'm just tired of watching Langdon race thru historic monuments.
      Why do so many authors just repeat their formula over and over? 

      10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 17, 2013

      inferno

      this was a book that I found I could not put down until I came to the end. very nail biting, with a surprising ending. loved it

      10 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 21, 2013

      Another great read...

      Once again, Dan Brown does not disappoint -- IF you understand Dan Brown. I have read all his books, and enjoy the fast paced thrilling ride he takes us on from the very first page. Interestingly, I read a newspaper review complaining that Inferno goes into too much explanation about art, architecture, geography, etc. I totally disagree! I found myself going back and forth between my Nook and the internet to "see" the places he was so beautifully describing. Even so, I finished the book in two days. Brown's books translate well into the illustrated versions for obvious reasons, and I will be adding this one to my collection when it is released. The only reason I gave 4 stars instead of 5 is because of Brown's continued formulaic writing, successful though it may be. But then -- I knew that going in.

      9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 25, 2013

      Bad

      I really struggled to read this crapload. Disappointed!

      8 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 1950 Customer Reviews

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)