Inferno: An Inquiry into the Willingham Fire

Inferno: An Inquiry into the Willingham Fire

2.6 14
by J Bennett Allen
     
 

Cameron Todd Willingham refused to walk to his execution. To his last moment he proclaimed his innocence of the arson that claimed the lives of his children.


While much has been written of the trial, conviction and execution of Willingham, Inferno is the first exploration of the possible causes of the fire that cost three children, and eventually,

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Overview

Cameron Todd Willingham refused to walk to his execution. To his last moment he proclaimed his innocence of the arson that claimed the lives of his children.


While much has been written of the trial, conviction and execution of Willingham, Inferno is the first exploration of the possible causes of the fire that cost three children, and eventually, Willingham himself, their lives.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011279133
Publisher:
Lynn Allen
Publication date:
04/09/2011
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
146,333
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

I write of wrongful convictions and executions. My wife edits and publishes my work. We have three books now available on Amazon, each in print and Kindle format. The books are:


The Skeptical Juror and The Trial of Byron Case


The Skeptical Juror and The Trial of Cory Maye


The Skeptical Juror and The Trial of Cameron Todd Willingham


We have edited and published Smith's Guide to Habeas Corpus Relief, written by Zachary A. Smith, an inmate and jailhouse lawyer. We have seen far too many cases of prisoners defaulting on their right to appeal because they had no defense counsel or (worse) they had inept counsel who simply failed to file within the deadline. In most cases, the would-be petitioners are factually guilty of the crime for which they are imprisoned. In a disturbing number of the cases, the would-be petitioners are factually innocent of the crime for which they are imprisoned. In all cases, someone we have imprisoned has lost one of the few legal rights he or she has left. We hope Smith's Guide will mitigate the problem by allowing prisoners to work more closely with their counsel or, if need be, to file the petition for habeas corpus pro se.


My next monograph will address the rate of wrongful convictions in American. You can read early drafts of most chapters at The Skeptical Juror blog (skepticaljuror.com). After reviewing a dozen estimates of the rate of wrongful conviction, and after presenting two separate analyses of my own, I argue that 10% of those we convict may in fact be innocent. Given that we have 2.5 million people incarcerated in this country, that means we may have a quarter of a million people behind bars for crimes they did not convict.


Of those quarter million who may be wrongfully imprisoned, I am directly involved in efforts to free two of them: Byron Case (Missouri) and Michael Ledford (Virginia). You can learn of Byron Case from my book. You can learn of Michael Ledford from my blog.


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Inferno 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Kovachev More than 1 year ago
As an Australian it is bewildering to me that the United States shares the death penalty with China and North Korea. If ever there was an argument against it, here it is in Inferno. This is every person’s worst nightmare. It is terrible what happened to this man. The book is well researched and tells a compelling story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
debramathis More than 1 year ago
This was a terribly sad and wrenching story. I remember this in the news. The book is not written that well but it does a good job of highlighting why the death penalty should be abolished.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting story however very repetative. Now that I think about it, its not really a story its the authors interpatation of the police and fire departments interviews as well as the surviving family members. Would not recommend. I got this book for free!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This little volume outlines the trial and execution of Todd Willingham. On even the most basic of academic levels, this book is poorly written at best. The author includes personal opinion as fact and cites non-academic sources such as Wikipedia. The author cites personal attempts to demonstrate fire behavior in the most unscientific "studies" (I use that word in the most liberal definition) I have ever seen published. The "about the author" section gives no indication as to the authors qualifications, education or experience.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
sucks
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an interesting short story. Wish there was more to it though .. not a happy ending...its reality tho
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Author repeats things a lot. I found the book to be somewhat interesting and think maybe Willingham was executed in error. Read it and make your own findings.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
jjelizalde More than 1 year ago
There's very little written about the people involved in this horrific fire. The book focuses on the author's attempts to disprove/prove evidence although he clearly does not have the credentials/expertise to do so.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An entertaining new twist on the Big Guy's feelings as Xmas nears him... thoughtful & smart, yet lots of fun!