Influence: Science and Practice / Edition 5

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Overview

Influence: Science and Practice is an examination of the psychology of compliance (i.e. uncovering which factors cause a person to say “yes” to another's request).

Written in a narrative style combined with scholarly research, Cialdini combines evidence from experimental work with the techniques and strategies he gathered while working as a salesperson, fundraiser, advertiser, and in other positions inside organizations that commonly use compliance tactics to get us to say “yes.” Widely used in classes, as well as sold to people operating successfully in the business world, the eagerly awaited revision of Influence reminds the reader of the power of persuasion.

Cialdini organizes compliance techniques into six categories based on psychological principles that direct human behavior: reciprocation, consistency, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity.

Whether you wish to understand what shapes you own personal decisions or need to persuade in a job or business, this astonishing took is indispensable.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Here's what people are saying about the material in INFLUENCE: Science and Practice:

“This marvelous book explains in clear, practical language the ways in which we become persuaded. It offers excellent insights for those who sell, but even more importantly for all of us who negotiate and buy.” –ROGER FISHER, Director, Harvard Negotiation Project, Co-author of “Getting to Yes.”

“For marketers, it is among the most important books written in the last 10 years.” –JOURNAL OF MARKETING RESEARCH

“The best sales tip I ever got was encouragement to read INFLUENCE by Dr. Robert Cialdini. It was so profound and insightful, I read it three times in a row.” –GREG RENKER, President, Guthy-Renker

“It would be marvelous reading for students taking Social Psychology.” –DAVID MYERS, Hope College

“The book is tremendously entertaining and very popular with students. It makes excellent reading for a Consumer Behavior or Advertising class.” –ALAN J. RESNIK, Portland State University

“INFLUENCE should be required reading for all business majors.” –JOURNAL OF RETAILING

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205609994
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 8/15/2008
  • Series: Alternative eText Formats Series
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 41,412
  • Lexile: 1280L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert B. Cialdini is Regents’ Professor of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University, where he has also been named W. P. Carey Distinguished Professor of Marketing. He has taught at Stanford University and Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He has been elected president of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology. He is the recipient of the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award of the Society for Consumer Psychology, the Donald T. Campbell Award for Distinguished Contributions to Social Psychology, and the (inaugural) Peitho Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Science of Social Influence.

Dr. Cialdini attributes his interest in social influences to the fact that he was raised in an entirely Italian family, in a predominantly Polish neighborhood, in a historically German city (Milwaukee), in an otherwise rural state.

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Read an Excerpt

The initial version of Influence was designed for the popular reader, and as such, an attempt was made to write it in an engaging style. In the subsequent versions, that style is retained, but in addition, I present the research evidence for my statements, recommendations, and conclusions. Although they are dramatized and corroborated through such devices as interviews, quotes, and systematic personal observations, the conclusions of Influence are based on controlled, psychological research. This fact allows the instructor, the student, and the popular reader to feel confident that the book is not "pop" psychology but represents work that is scientifically grounded. The subsequent versions also provide new and updated material, chapter summaries, and study questions to enhance its classroom utility.

A potentially attractive feature of the present version of Influence lies in its ability to serve as an enjoyable, practical, yet scientifically documented text for both students and the general reader. For students, one way to view the book, then, is to see it as a refreshing change of pace (from standard text material) that does not retreat from scientific respectability. In a related vein, for both students and the general reader, the book might be seen as a way to demonstrate that, properly presented, what often seems like dry science can actually prove to be lively, useful, and relevant to all readers' personal lives.

COMMENT ON THE FOURTH EDITION OF INFLUENCE: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE

It has been some time since Influence was last published. In the interim, some things have happened that deserve a place in this new edition. First, we nowknow more about the influence process than before. The study of persuasion, compliance, and change has advanced, and the pages that follow have been adapted to reflect that progress. In addition to an overall update of the material, I have expanded a feature that was stimulated by the responses of prior readers.

This feature highlights the experiences of individuals who have read Influence, recognized how one of the principles worked on (or for) them in a particular instance, and wrote to me describing the event. Their descriptions, which appear in the "Reader's Reports" in each chapter, illustrate how easily and frequently we can fall victim to the influence process in our everyday lives.

An array of people deserve and have my appreciation for their aid in making Influence possible. Several of my academic colleagues read and provided perceptive comments on the entire manuscript in its initial draft form, greatly strengthening the subsequent version. They are Gus Levine, Doug Kenrick, Art Beaman, and Mark Zanna. In addition, the first draft was read by a few family members and friends Richard and Gloria Cialdini, Bobette Gorden, and Ted Hall-who offered not only much-needed emotional support but insightful substantive commentary as well.

A second, larger group provided helpful suggestions for selected chapters or groups of chapters: Todd Anderson, Sandy Braver, Catherine Chambers, Judi Cialdini, Nancy Eisenberg, Larry Ettkin, Joanne Gersten, Jeff Goldstein, Betsy Hans, Valerie Hans, Joe Hepworth, Holly Hunt, Ann Inskeep, Barry Leshowitz, Darwyn Linder, Debbie Littler, John Mowen, Igor Pavlov, Janis Posner, Trish Puryear, Marilyn Rall, John Reich, Peter Reingen, Diane Ruble, Phyllis Sensenig, Roman Sherman, and Henry Wellman.

Certain people were instrumental at the beginning stages. John Staley was the first publishing professional to recognize the project's potential. Jim Sherman, Al Goethals, John Keating, Dan Wagner, Dalmas Taylor, Wendy Wood, and David Watson provided early, positive reviews that encouraged author and editors alike. My editors at Allyn and Bacon, Carolyn Merrill and Jodi Devine, were consistently congenial, helpful, and insightful. I would like to thank the following users of the third edition for their feedback during a telephone survey: Emory Griffin, Wheaton College; Robert Levine, California State, Fresno; Jeffrey Lewin, Georgia State University; David Miller, Daytona Beach Community College; Lois Mohr, Georgia State University; and Richard Rogers, Daytona Beach Community College. The third edition benefited substantially from the reviews of Assaad Azzi, Yale University; Robert M. Brady, University of Arkansas; Brian M. Cohen, University of Texas at San Antonio; Christian B. Crandall, University of Florida; Catherine Goodwin, University of Alaska; Robert G. Lowder, Bradley University; James W. Michael, Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Eugene P. Sheehan, University of Northern Colorado; Jefferson A. Singer, Connecticut College; and Sandi W. Smith, Michigan State University. Finally, throughout the project, no one was more on my side than Bobette Gorden, who lived every word with me.

I wish to thank the following individuals who-either directly or through their course instructors-contributed the "Reader's Reports" used in this edition: Pat Bobbs, Annie Carto, William Cooper, Alicia Friedman, William Graziano, Mark Hastings, Endayehu Kendie, Danuta Lubnicka, James Michaels, Steven Moysey, Paul Nail, Alan J. Resnik, Daryl Retzlaff, Geofrey Rosenberger, Dan Swift, and Karla Vasks.

I would also like to invite new readers to contribute similar "Reports" for possible publication in a future edition. They can be sent to me at the Department of Psychology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1104 or Robert.Cialdini@ ASU.EDU. Finally, more influence-relevant information can be obtained at Influenceatwork.com.

R.B.C.

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Table of Contents

All chapters conclude with “Summary” and “Study Questions.”

Preface.
Introduction.

1.Weapons of Influence.

Click, Whirr.

Betting the Shortcut Odd.

The Profiteers.

Jujitsu.

Reader's Report.

2.Reciprocation: The Old Give and Take … and Take.

How the Rule Works.

Reciprocal Concessions.

Rejection-Then-Retreat.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

3.Commitment and Consistency: Hobgoblins of the Mind.

Whirring Along.

Commitment Is the Key.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

4.Social Proof: Truths Are Us.

The Principle of Social Proof.

Cause of Death: Uncertain(ty).

Monkey Me, Monkey Do.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

5.Liking: The Friendly Thief.

Making Friends to Influence People.

Why Do I Like You? Let Me List the Reasons.

Conditioning and Association.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

6.Authority: Directed Deference.

The Power of Authority Pressure.

The Allures and Dangers of Blind Obedience.

Connotation Not Content.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

7.Scarcity: The Rule of the Few.

Less Is Best and Loss Is Worst.

Psychological Reactance.

Optimal Conditions.

Defense.

Reader's Report.

8.Instant Influence: Primitive Consent for an Automatic Age.

Primitive Automaticity.

Modern Automaticity.

Shortcuts Shall Be Sacred.

References.
Credits.
Index.

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Preface

The initial version of Influence was designed for the popular reader, and as such, an attempt was made to write it in an engaging style. In the subsequent versions, that style is retained, but in addition, I present the research evidence for my statements, recommendations, and conclusions. Although they are dramatized and corroborated through such devices as interviews, quotes, and systematic personal observations, the conclusions of Influence are based on controlled, psychological research. This fact allows the instructor, the student, and the popular reader to feel confident that the book is not "pop" psychology but represents work that is scientifically grounded. The subsequent versions also provide new and updated material, chapter summaries, and study questions to enhance its classroom utility.

A potentially attractive feature of the present version of Influence lies in its ability to serve as an enjoyable, practical, yet scientifically documented text for both students and the general reader. For students, one way to view the book, then, is to see it as a refreshing change of pace (from standard text material) that does not retreat from scientific respectability. In a related vein, for both students and the general reader, the book might be seen as a way to demonstrate that, properly presented, what often seems like dry science can actually prove to be lively, useful, and relevant to all readers' personal lives.

COMMENT ON THE FOURTH EDITION OF INFLUENCE: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE
It has been some time since Influence was last published. In the interim, some things have happened that deserve a place in this new edition. First, we now know more about theinfluence process than before. The study of persuasion, compliance, and change has advanced, and the pages that follow have been adapted to reflect that progress. In addition to an overall update of the material, I have expanded a feature that was stimulated by the responses of prior readers.

This feature highlights the experiences of individuals who have read Influence, recognized how one of the principles worked on (or for) them in a particular instance, and wrote to me describing the event. Their descriptions, which appear in the "Reader's Reports" in each chapter, illustrate how easily and frequently we can fall victim to the influence process in our everyday lives.

An array of people deserve and have my appreciation for their aid in making Influence possible. Several of my academic colleagues read and provided perceptive comments on the entire manuscript in its initial draft form, greatly strengthening the subsequent version. They are Gus Levine, Doug Kenrick, Art Beaman, and Mark Zanna. In addition, the first draft was read by a few family members and friends Richard and Gloria Cialdini, Bobette Gorden, and Ted Hall-who offered not only much-needed emotional support but insightful substantive commentary as well.

A second, larger group provided helpful suggestions for selected chapters or groups of chapters: Todd Anderson, Sandy Braver, Catherine Chambers, Judi Cialdini, Nancy Eisenberg, Larry Ettkin, Joanne Gersten, Jeff Goldstein, Betsy Hans, Valerie Hans, Joe Hepworth, Holly Hunt, Ann Inskeep, Barry Leshowitz, Darwyn Linder, Debbie Littler, John Mowen, Igor Pavlov, Janis Posner, Trish Puryear, Marilyn Rall, John Reich, Peter Reingen, Diane Ruble, Phyllis Sensenig, Roman Sherman, and Henry Wellman.

Certain people were instrumental at the beginning stages. John Staley was the first publishing professional to recognize the project's potential. Jim Sherman, Al Goethals, John Keating, Dan Wagner, Dalmas Taylor, Wendy Wood, and David Watson provided early, positive reviews that encouraged author and editors alike. My editors at Allyn and Bacon, Carolyn Merrill and Jodi Devine, were consistently congenial, helpful, and insightful. I would like to thank the following users of the third edition for their feedback during a telephone survey: Emory Griffin, Wheaton College; Robert Levine, California State, Fresno; Jeffrey Lewin, Georgia State University; David Miller, Daytona Beach Community College; Lois Mohr, Georgia State University; and Richard Rogers, Daytona Beach Community College. The third edition benefited substantially from the reviews of Assaad Azzi, Yale University; Robert M. Brady, University of Arkansas; Brian M. Cohen, University of Texas at San Antonio; Christian B. Crandall, University of Florida; Catherine Goodwin, University of Alaska; Robert G. Lowder, Bradley University; James W. Michael, Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Eugene P. Sheehan, University of Northern Colorado; Jefferson A. Singer, Connecticut College; and Sandi W. Smith, Michigan State University. Finally, throughout the project, no one was more on my side than Bobette Gorden, who lived every word with me.

I wish to thank the following individuals who-either directly or through their course instructors-contributed the "Reader's Reports" used in this edition: Pat Bobbs, Annie Carto, William Cooper, Alicia Friedman, William Graziano, Mark Hastings, Endayehu Kendie, Danuta Lubnicka, James Michaels, Steven Moysey, Paul Nail, Alan J. Resnik, Daryl Retzlaff, Geofrey Rosenberger, Dan Swift, and Karla Vasks.

I would also like to invite new readers to contribute similar "Reports" for possible publication in a future edition.

R.B.C.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 87 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(42)

4 Star

(17)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(12)

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(6)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2001

    Wonderful Stories Exquisitely Told

    I frequently reflect on the insights gained from Cialdini¿s superb book in both my private life and my life as a public relations professional (the ultimate influence peddlar). His research is sound and his style completely readable ¿a book filled with many ¿aha!¿ revelations. I recommend this book all the time, often purchasing one to give to a colleague. Simple truths told simply.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 14, 2010

    Tired of being duped?

    This book tells you in a very concise and direct manner all of the tricks that advertisers, marketers, and salesmen use to get you to buy, to say yes when you really don't want to. If you don't want to be taken advantage of then you need to read this book to understand how its being done.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2004

    I absolutely loved it!

    I bought the book on a recommendation of an aquaintance. I was told it was a MUST READ for everyone. I figured what the heck and bought it. I couldn't put it down from page 1. I breezed thru it and I loved it. I was actually getting flustered near the end because I wanted more. This is an excellent book! Highly recommend it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2010

    Eye-Opening!

    All I can say is thanks to this book, I now appreciate why Barnes and Nobles asks us to write these reviews. Still very useful nonetheless.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2006

    Re-inventing my career...

    This is a fascinating book backed up with psychology and clinical proof! Since I¿m re-inventing my career (to marketing/sales) I¿ve found the information to be extremely useful ¿ even out shopping I see all kinds of examples detailed in the book. The section on scarcity was particularly useful and one that I used to buy into. Another read I just finished that is extremely useful/tactical in re-inventing (and since getting hired!!!) is The Sales Adventure Guide. This no punches pulled Sales Adventure Guide walked me through how to market myself and (to date) stay employed. Read and prosper!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2006

    Great, helpful book.

    Great book - provides wonderful insight into human nature and an understanding of how you make decisions (become persuaded). Don't be fooled by the 'Psychology' in the title - the title could have been: 'Understanding Persuasion' or 'A Study of Persuasion' or 'A Self Help Guide for Suckers of Persuasion'. Absolutely critical read for anyone who is interested in making objective decisions. (All these reviewers, including professors and other experts, purchased and recommend this book. Spend a couple days reading a book that will save you years of bad decisions.)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2003

    Are you influencial?

    This is an interesting book written by a Robert Cialdini, PhD dealing with the psychology of request compliance (persuasion) The book is replete with real life anecdotes and psychological experiments without any psychobabble. The subject deals with basic human psychology, automatic response and human perception The level of analysis is quite detailed with pictures, graphs, cartoons and famous sayings. The author keeps the subject interesting by mixing conceptual presentation, story telling, historical issues and psychological research. It is a well studied subject reminiscent of Dale Carnegie¿s classic book about How to Make Friends and Influence people. This book arms the job hunter and the workplace with effective techniques in persuasion. The book end abruptly without integrating the subject. The seven principles outlined in the book are: Weapons of Influence ¿ studies the concept of perceptual contrast as an example an unhappy event in contrast with a more philosophical approach might reduce the severity of the event when contrasted. Reciprocation: Emphasizes human nature of feeling obligated when one is provided first with a small favor. Commitment & Consistency: being consistent (as opposed to being right) is a natural human response stemming from the need to appear logical, honest and personal and intellectual strength. This sometimes results in mechanical consistency. By encouraging someone to making a statement or taking action the individual creates commitment and hence will feel pressed to remain consistent with that commitment. Social Proof: At times of uncertainty or indecision people are influenced by those who can show clarity through suggesting acting or thinking like the rest of us. Liking: We tend to say yes to those who we know or like. The Tupperware party¿s example demonstrates this principle. Authority: The author suggests that authority in context, title, attire has a significant influence. Scarcity: as opportunities become less available people realize that they hate losing freedom so they react to correct that. The book deals with the ethical issues as well as methods to counteract the unscrupulous practitioners of these principles.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2003

    The Power of Persuasion and Manipulation

    Robert B. Cialdini concisely explores six strategies that persons with good and/or bad intentions can use in influencing others to do something or not to do it. These strategies are authority, commitment and consistency, liking, reciprocation, scarcity, and social proof. Cialdini convincingly demonstrates the power of each strategy with examples belonging to a wide range of disciplines. These stratagems often work because the target audience has been preprogrammed to react to specific situations in a certain way. Cialdini clearly explains which counter-strategies the target audience can use in defeating the six strategies mentioned above, whenever appropriate. To his credit, Cialdini refrains from using jargon that makes Influence Science and Practice a very enjoyable read that is easily accessible to a wide audience. As a side note, in Simplicity Marketing, Steven M. Cristol and Peter Sealey explore the increasing need for shortcuts that businesses and consumers in the most developed economies have in making choices. Cristol and Sealey show with panache that marketers can use four strategies called the 4 R's, Replace, Repackage, Reposition, and Replenish, to simplify the life of businesses and consumers who are overwhelmed with choices in an increasing number of product categories.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2001

    One of the best written and most useful books I have ever read

    I first read this book (under the title Influence: Science and Practice) when I was about 13. I re-read it every two years. I have used this information almost every week of my life, from job interviews through buying my first car. Cialdini's information is dead-on accurate. I have used this book in philosophy classes and he is a great reference for the student in any liberal art. His information has not only saved me money, it has helped my personal relationships, and helped me learn to get what I want, while making sure that other parties are satisfied as well. And excellent book for anyone.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2001

    My Favorite Book Ever

    I absolutely enjoyed this book -not just because of the continuity of the authorship but because of the incredibly invaluable information in this book. I was recommended this book from my psych roommate at Dartmouth who had to read it for her class and I was pleasantly surprised at what a good read it was. Please don't be deceived by the title 'the psychology of persuasion', it's as much about how to persuade others as it is about how we're all extremely vulnerable to being persuaded. This is a book for EVERYONE because it addresses intrinsic flaws in how living beings perceive the world in which we live (see the synopsis). In addition, the author clearly sites all the studies and reports that are widely available, but he doesn't use so much technical psych-jargon that you need a PhD. My only critique is that the book really should have been a little thicker -I felt like the book ended a little too abruptly. But, even that cannot subtract from the 5 stars that it deserves.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2001

    I loved it!

    This is one of the most profound and influential (excuse the pun) books I've ever read. My wife and I fought over it! I am a Public Speaking Coach focused on high tech executives. I have a background in sales and marketing. I have found this book to be a gold mine of information for all of these areas. I have reccomended the book to everyone that I know. I intend to add it to the Bibliography section of my website.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2000

    Required Reading for the Intelligent Consumer

    The human mind is a wonderful thing, capable of the most wonderful thought processes and ideas. Yet the brain is on automatic pilot for most situations. That allows the conscious mind to really focus. The drawback is that some people will use our conscious inattention to sneak one by us, like a fastball pitch to a hitter looking for a change-up. Influence, the book, is very useful in this regard, because it uses interesting examples to help us be aware of our own tendency to let automatic pilot thinking take over. Since I first read this book many years ago, I have been watching to see if the circumstances I see support or invalidate Professor Cialdini's points. By a margin of about 9 to 1, Cialdini wins. Given that we are easily manipulated by our desire to be and to appear to be consistent with our past actions and statements, swayed by what the crowd is doing, and various other mechanisms, the only way we can be armed against unscrupulous marketing is to be as aware of these factors are the marketers are. At the same time, I appreciated how the book explores the ethics of when and how much to apply these principles. Without this discussion, the book would come off like Machiavelli's, The Prince, for marketing organizations. That would have been a shame. By dealing with the ethics, Professor Cialdini creates the opportunity to educate us intellectually and morally. Well done! I have read literally dozens of books about marketing and selling, and I find this one to be the most helpful in thinking about how influence actually works. Even if you will never work in marketing, you will benefit from reading this book in order to better focus your purchases and actions where they fit your needs rather than someone else's. Donald Mitchell, coauthor of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2000

    i loved this book

    i finish few books, but i plan to read this twice. i learned stuff applicable at home as well as at work. i would reccomend to anyone, including my wife.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted August 4, 2011

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    Posted August 15, 2011

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    Posted December 1, 2009

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    Posted January 28, 2010

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    Posted January 11, 2010

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    Posted January 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews

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