Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale

Overview

Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures ...
See more details below
Hardcover
$154.04
BN.com price
(Save 6%)$165.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $103.85   
  • New (7) from $103.85   
  • Used (1) from $154.03   

Overview

Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures for information storage and processing purposes.

Divided into twelve chapters; the first three chapters serve as an introduction to the basic concepts of digital information processing, its development, limitations and finally introduces some alternative concepts for prospective technologies. Chapters four and five discuss traditional low-dimensional metals and semiconductors and carbon nanostructures respectively, while further chapters discuss Photoelectrochemical photocurrent switching and related phenomena and self-organization and self-assembly. Chapters eight, nine and ten discuss information processing at the molecular level, and eleven describes information processing in natural systems. The book concludes with a discussion of the future prospects for the field.

Further topics:

  • Traditional electronic device development is rapidly approaching a limit, so molecular scale information processing is critical in order to meet increasing demand for high computational power
  • Characterizes chemical systems not according to their chemical nature, but according to their role as prospective information technology elements
  • Covers the application of molecular species and nanostructures as molecular scale logic gates, switches, memories, and complex computing devices

This book will be of particular interest to researchers in nanoelectronics, organic electronics, optoelectronics, chemistry and materials science.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470710722
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 7/3/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 496
  • Product dimensions: 6.70 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Acknowledgements xiii

1 Introduction to the Theory of Information 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Definition and Properties of Information 2

1.3 Principles of Boolean Algebra 4

1.4 Digital Information Processing and Logic Gates 7

1.4.1 Simple Logic Gates 7

1.4.2 Concatenated Logic Circuits 10

1.4.3 Sequential Logic Circuits 11

1.5 Ternary and Higher Logic Calculi 14

1.6 Irreversible vs Reversible Logic 16

1.7 Quantum Logic 18

References 20

2 Physical and Technological Limits of Classical Electronics 23

2.1 Introduction 23

2.2 Fundamental Limitations of Information Processing 24

2.3 Technological Limits of Miniaturization 27

References 34

3 Changing the Paradigm: Towards Computation with Molecules 37

References 53

4 Low-Dimensional Metals and Semiconductors 63

4.1 Dimensionality and Morphology of Nanostructures 63

4.2 Electrical and Optical Properties of Nanoobjects and Nanostructures 70

4.2.1 Metals 70

4.2.2 Semiconductors 84

4.3 Molecular Scale Engineering of Semiconducting Surfaces 96

4.3.1 Semiconductor–Molecule Interactions 100

4.3.2 Electronic Coupling between Semiconducting Surfaces and Adsorbates 103

References 109

5 Carbon Nanostructures 119

5.1 Nanoforms of Carbon 119

5.2 Electronic Structure and Properties of Graphene 120

5.3 Carbon Nanotubes 129

5.4 Conjugated and Polyaromatic Systems 139

5.5 Nanocarbon and Organic Semiconductor Devices 149

References 156

6 Photoelectrochemical Photocurrent Switching and Related Phenomena 165

6.1 Photocurrent Generation and Switching in Neat Semiconductors 165

6.2 Photocurrent Switching in MIM Organic Devices 168

6.3 Photocurrent Switching in Semiconducting Composites 178

6.4 Photocurrent Switching in Surface-Modified Semiconductors 181

References 192

7 Self-Organization and Self-Assembly in Supramolecular Systems 199

7.1 Supramolecular Assembly: Towards Molecular Devices 199

7.2 Self-Assembled Semiconducting Structures 201

7.3 Self-Assembly at Solid Interfaces 210

7.4 Controlling Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles 212

7.5 Self-Assembly and Molecular Electronics 215

References 219

8 Molecular-Scale Electronics 225

8.1 Electron Transfer and Molecular Junctions 225

8.2 Nanoscale Electromagnetism 232

8.3 Molecular Rectifiers 238

References 246

9 Molecular Logic Gates 249

9.1 Introduction 249

9.2 Chemically Driven Logic Gates 249

9.2.1 OR Gates 252

9.2.2 AND Gates 255

9.2.3 XOR Gates 267

9.2.4 INH Gates 272

9.2.5 IMP Gates 281

9.2.6 Inverted Logic Gates (NOR, NAND, XNOR) 283

9.2.7 Behind Classical Boolean Scheme-Ternary Logic and Feynman Gate 289

9.3 All-Optical Logic Gates 298

9.4 Electrochemical Logic Systems 307

References 315

10 Molecular Computing Systems 323

10.1 Introduction 323

10.2 Reconfigurable and Superimposed Molecular Logic Devices 323

10.3 Concatenated Chemical Logic Systems 337

10.4 Molecular-Scale Digital Communication 353

10.4.1 Multiplexers and Demultiplexers 354

10.4.2 Encoders and Decoders 355

10.4.3 Molecular-Scale Signal Amplification 359

10.5 Molecular Arithmetics: Adders and Subtractors 363

10.5.1 Molecular-Scale Half-Adders 363

10.5.2 Molecular-Scale Half-Subtractors 372

10.5.3 Half-Adders/Half-Subtractors 381

10.5.4 Full Adders and Full Subtractors: Towards Molecular Processors 382

10.6 Molecular-Scale Security Systems 386

10.7 Noise and Error Propagation in Concatenated Systems 396

References 398

11 Bioinspired and Biomimetic Logic Devices 405

11.1 Information Processing in Natural Systems 405

11.2 Protein-Based Digital Systems 408

11.2.1 Enzymes as Information Processing Molecules 409

11.2.2 Enzymes as Information Carriers 428

11.3 Binary Logic Devices based on Nucleic Acids 430

11.4 Logic Devices Based on Whole Organisms 445

References 450

12 Concluding Remarks and Future Prospects 457

References 458

Index 461

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)