Informatik. Eine grundlegende Einführung: Teil III: Systemstrukturen und systemnahe Programmierung

Overview

Dieser dritte Teil der vierteiligen Einführung in die Informatik behandelt verteilte informationsverarbeitende Systeme und systemnahe Programmierung. Nach den Grundbegriffen verteilter Systeme und den zugrundeliegenden mathematischen Modellen werden elementare Beschreibungstechniken für Systeme, z.B. Petri-Netze und die Hoare'sche Notation für kommunizierende, sequentielle Programme, vorgestellt sowie die Programmierung parallel ablaufender Programme. Weiter werden typische Aspekte der systemnahen Programmierung ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $52.40   
  • New (5) from $52.40   
Sending request ...

Overview

Dieser dritte Teil der vierteiligen Einführung in die Informatik behandelt verteilte informationsverarbeitende Systeme und systemnahe Programmierung. Nach den Grundbegriffen verteilter Systeme und den zugrundeliegenden mathematischen Modellen werden elementare Beschreibungstechniken für Systeme, z.B. Petri-Netze und die Hoare'sche Notation für kommunizierende, sequentielle Programme, vorgestellt sowie die Programmierung parallel ablaufender Programme. Weiter werden typische Aspekte der systemnahen Programmierung wie Aufbau und Wirkungsweise von Betriebssystemen besprochen sowie die syntaktischen und semantischen Aspekte der Implementierung von Programmiersprachen. Dabei werden für eine einfache funktionale Sprache beispielhaft ein Übersetzer und ein Interpretierer angegeben.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783540576723
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 8/3/1994
  • Language: German
  • Series: Springer-Lehrbuch Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 187
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.42 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Prozesse, Kommunikation und Koordination in verteilten Systemen.- 1.1 Prozesse.- 1.1.1 Aktionsstrukturen als Prozesse.- 1.1.2 Strukturierung von Prozessen.- 1.1.3 Sequentielle Darstellung von Prozessen durch Spuren.- 1.1.4 Zerlegung von Prozessen in Teilprozesse.- 1.1.5 Aktionen als Zustandsübergänge.- 1.2 Systembeschreibungen durch Mengen von Prozessen.- 1.2.1 Petri-Netze.- 1.2.2 Terme zur Beschreibung von Prozessen.- 1.2.3 Synchronisation und Koordination von Agenten.- 1.2.4 Prädikate über Prozessen.- 1.3 Programmiersprachen zur Beschreibung kommunizierender Systeme.- 1.3.1 Kommunikation durch Nachrichtenaustausch.- 1.3.2 Gemeinsame Programmvariable.- 1.3.3 Sprachmittel für parallele Abläufe.- 1.3.4 Ein-/Ausgabeströme.- 2. Betriebssysteme und Systemprogrammierung.- 2.1 Grundlegende Betriebssystemaspekte.- 2.1.1 Aufgaben eines Betriebssystems.- 2.1.2 Betriebsarten.- 2.1.3 Ein einfaches Betriebssystem für den Stapelbetrieb.- 2.1.4 Ein einfaches Betriebssystem für Multiplexbetrieb.- 2.2 Benutzerrelevante Aspekte von Betriebssystemen.- 2.2.1 Kommandosprache.- 2.2.2 Benutzerverwaltung.- 2.2.3 Zugriff auf Rechenleistung.- 2.2.4 Dateiorganisation und-Verwaltung.- 2.2.5 Übertragungsdienste.- 2.2.6 Zuverlässigkeit und Schutzaspekte.- 2.3 Betriebsmittelzuteilung.- 2.3.1 Rechnerkernvergabe.- 2.3.2 Hauptspeicherverwaltung.- 2.3.3 Zuteilung der Ein-/Ausgabegeräte.- 2.3.4 Betriebsmittelvergabe im Mehrprogrammbetrieb.- 2.3.5 Betriebsmittelzuteilung im Dialogbetrieb.- 2.4 Implementierungstechniken der Systemprogrammierung.- 2.4.1 Das Unterbrechungskonzept.- 2.4.2 Koordination.- 2.4.3 Segmentierung.- 2.4.4 Seitenaustausehverfahren.- 2.4.5 Verschiebbarkeit von Programmen.- 2.4.6 Simultane Benutzbarkeit von Unterprogrammen.- 2.4.7 Steuerung von E/A-Geräten.- 2.5 Betriebssystemstrukturen.- 2.5.1 Betriebssystemstrukturierung.- 2.5.2 Prozeßorientierte Betriebssystemstrukturen.- 3. Interpretation und Übersetzung von Programmen.- 3.1 Lexikalische Analyse von Programmiersprachen.- 3.1.1 Die Vorgruppierabbildung.- 3.1.2 Ein ausführlicheres Beispiel: AS.- 3.1.3 Lexikalische Analyse von AS.- 3.2 Zerteilung von Programmen.- 3.2.1 Abstrakte Syntax.- 3.2.2 Baumdarstellung von AS-Programmen.- 3.2.3 Parsen von AS-Programmen.- 3.3. Kontextbedingungen.- 3.3.1 Kontextbedingungen und Prädikate.- 3.3.2 Kontextbedingungen für die Programmiersprache AS.- 3.3.3 Syntaktische Analyse von AS.- 3.4 Interpretation von Programmiersprachen.- 3.4.1 Semantik.- 3.4.2 Syntax und Semantik.- 3.4.3 Eingabe und Ausgabe.- 3.4.4 Interpretierer.- 3.4.5 Die Kellermaschine: Ein Beispiel für einen Interpreter.- 3.4.6 Ein AS-Interpreter.- 3.5 Allgemeine Bemerkungen zu Interpretern.- 3.5.1 Übersetzer.- 3.5.2 Übersetzung von AS-Programmen in KMS-Programme.- Literaturangaben.- Stichwortverzeichnis.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)