The Information Economy and American Cities

Overview

How can metropolitan regions remain prosperous and competitive in a rapidly changing economy? Challenging some long-standing assumptions, Matthew Drennan argues that those regions that have invested heavily in the information economy have done much better than those that continue to rely on manufacturing and industry as their base. Moreover, he contends, the benefits of that growth reach the urban working poor, earlier reports to the contrary notwithstanding.

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Overview

How can metropolitan regions remain prosperous and competitive in a rapidly changing economy? Challenging some long-standing assumptions, Matthew Drennan argues that those regions that have invested heavily in the information economy have done much better than those that continue to rely on manufacturing and industry as their base. Moreover, he contends, the benefits of that growth reach the urban working poor, earlier reports to the contrary notwithstanding.

The Information Economy and American Cities provides a wealth of rigorously analyzed econometric data which will be of great value to economists, planners, and policymakers concerned with the future of America's metropolitan areas. Additional supporting data will be made available online. Not just another glib cheer for the information economy, this book provides the kind of hard evidence needed to advocate effectively for change.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Choice

Sprinkled with challenges to conventional wisdom, this book provides solid empirical documentation of sectoral change in U.S. metropolitan areas and makes an important contribution to the literature on the information economy.

Regional Science and Urban Economics
An excellent analysis of the rise and role of the information sector—composed of producer services and advanced consumer services—in regional economic development... I enjoyed this book a great deal and highly recommend it to both researchers and practitioners working in the area of urban and regional policy.

— John I. Carruthers

Journal of Regional Science
An accessible examination of the rise and importance of the information sector in the United States... A welcome contribution to an important area of study, offering an interdisciplinary and evidence-based account of fundamental changes in the American economy.

— Tim May and Beth Perry

Regional Science and Urban Economics - John I. Carruthers

An excellent analysis of the rise and role of the information sector—composed of producer services and advanced consumer services—in regional economic development... I enjoyed this book a great deal and highly recommend it to both researchers and practitioners working in the area of urban and regional policy.

Journal of Regional Science - Tim May and Beth Perry

An accessible examination of the rise and importance of the information sector in the United States... A welcome contribution to an important area of study, offering an interdisciplinary and evidence-based account of fundamental changes in the American economy.

Choice

Sprinkled with challenges to conventional wisdom, this book provides solid empirical documentation of sectoral change in U.S. metropolitan areas and makes an important contribution to the literature on the information economy.

Dick Netzer
There is enormous interest in the dramatic changes that have occurred in the American economy over the last thirty years. A great deal has been written on the subject,much of it needlessly alarmist. This is the first book that systematically and comprehensively asks all the important questions. And it answers those questions lucidly and persuasively. I have known Drennan's work for a very long time. He has always been effective in communicating with the reader,but this is his best work to date.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801869341
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2002
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Matthew P. Drennan is currently a visiting professor in the Department of Urban Planning at UCLA. He is on leave from the Department of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. His previous books include Methods of Interregional and Regional Analysis and Modeling Metropolitan Economies for Forecasting and Policy Analysis.

Johns Hopkins University Press

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Table of Contents

Contents:List of Tables and Figures

Preface and AcknowledgementsIntroduction1. Describing the Elephant: The Information Sector

2. Emergence of the Information Sector

3. The Information Sector in Metropolitan Economies

4. Metropolitan Income and Growth: The Roles of Specialization, Size, and Human Capital

5. Income Convergence and Poverty in Metropolitan Areas

6. Conclusion and Policy RecommendationsAppendix

References

Index

Johns Hopkins University Press

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