Information Graphics: Animal Kingdom

Information Graphics: Animal Kingdom

5.0 1
by Simon Rogers, Nicholas Blechman
     
 

The first in a visually stunning series, Information Graphics: Animal Kingdom shows just how interesting and humorous scientific information can be. Complex facts about the animal kingdom are reinterpreted as stylish information graphics that astonish, amuse, and inform, and tabbed chapters make information fast to find. Researched by the Guardian

Overview

The first in a visually stunning series, Information Graphics: Animal Kingdom shows just how interesting and humorous scientific information can be. Complex facts about the animal kingdom are reinterpreted as stylish information graphics that astonish, amuse, and inform, and tabbed chapters make information fast to find. Researched by the Guardian’s Datablog founder and illustrated by the award-winning designer Nicholas Blechman, this is a book of the highest pedigree.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
02/10/2014
Illustrator/designer Blechman’s crisp, bold graphics are sure to grab eyeballs in this first book in a series that takes a visual approach to sharing information. Tabs help readers flip between eight chapters devoted to animal species, families, habitats, predators, and more; dogs get their own chapter, which includes a profile view of a canine skeleton, an icon-based guide to dogs’ body language, and simplified portraits of a dozen breeds. While Blechman’s illustrations are extremely eye-catching, many are just that—illustrations. Diagrams that show animals’ comparative speeds, brain sizes, or number of teeth (represented by toothbrushes of increasing length) are clear as can be, but most of the stylish and stylized images still rely on Rogers’s text to convey the nitty-gritty details of the animals’ abilities, habits, and characteristics. That won’t stop animal-loving readers from diving in, though. Ages 6–9. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
Illustrator/designer Blechman’s crisp, bold graphics are sure to grab eyeballs in this first book in a series that takes a visual approach to sharing information. Tabs help readers flip between eight chapters devoted to animal species, families, habitats, predators, and more...
—Publishers Weekly

Readers will be attracted to the cover of this book, with its uniquely designed images set against a vibrant, green background. ... Almost all the pages offer intriguing facts and cartoonish illustrations (one arresting spread of red, black, and green features self-defense techniques).
—School Library Journal

This book is a treasure trove of fascinating animal facts that breaks down complex scientific information into colorful and engaging data visualizations. Want to compare the weight of different animals' brains? Learn the names of hybrid animals? You can! This book has it all and is perfect for elementary school students.
—The Huffington Post

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Blechman, author/illustrator of the ingenious counting-book Night Light (Orchard, 2013), has created, with data journalist Rogers, a stunningly designed compendium of statistics and graphics about unusual animals of the earth. The categories chosen are intriguing: species, senses, family, record-breakers, food and drink, habitats, killers, and an entire chapter on the dog as “man’s best friend.” (Domestic cats are dismissed as killers on one page. Statistics show they kill billions of birds and mammals in the U.S. each year.) Blechman’s silhouette shapes are stunning against pages glowing with saturated colors—emerald, magenta, sun yellow, crimson, pulsing turquoise, with black and white. Each group is presented in a unique graphic form, sometimes with text that swirls, spirals, or follows the shape of an octagonal web. Subjects often cover double-page spreads, but even those on two juxtaposed pages have a design or color connection. While Blechman captures the essence of each creature—vertebrate or invertebrate, warm or cold-blooded—bringing the data brilliantly to life, it must be said that he has missed some of the birds; neither barn owls nor tawny owls, for example, have ear tufts and the peregrine falcon is completely off, lacking the long pointed wings and distinctive falcon head. But readers will love many of the pages, like “Totally Spineless” with its green and yellow invertebrates on magenta (making up 97% of all species, the data tells us), or “Big Thinkers,” in black on yellow with pictured brains—the sperm whale’s weighs seventeen pounds versus three for humans. Urban and farm environments are shown with fascinating data (10,000 foxes live in London), global warming’s accompanied by a frightening prediction. Actually, it is impossible to choose favorites; parents, teachers, and artists will treasure this visually-exciting book as much as young animal-lovers. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft; Ages 6 to 9.
School Library Journal
04/01/2014
Gr 4 Up—Readers will be attracted to thecover of this book, with its uniquely designed images set against a vibrant, green background. Inside, they will find a range of very general information about the animal kingdom. The table of contents lists eight chapters with brightly colored chapter tabs ("Species," "Senses," "Record Breakers," etc.). Almost all the pages offer intriguing facts and cartoonish illustrations (one arresting spread of red, black, and green features self-defense techniques), but no photos are included. Actual size proportions are often ignored in these illustrations (for instance, on one page, a chameleon is almost as large as a whale). Students will find it challenging to compare and contrast animals because the material is so broad; text fonts are extremely small, owing to the need to fit a large amount of information on each page; the vocabulary is geared toward adults; and the book lacks both a glossary and index. Artistically, this title is visually pleasing, and children will enjoy it for the fun factor, but it should not be considered for purchase as a science reference.—Caroline Geck, Camden Street School Library, Newark, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
2014-01-15
With scattered exceptions, the trendy "infographics" approach stops at the title in this haphazard ramble past animal types and extremes. The book is printed on stiff stock and features edge tabs bearing icons to denote each section's subject—not always well-chosen ones: Dog faces mark both the chapter on dogs and one on animal senses in general. The coverage begins with Darwin and ends abruptly (sans index or other backmatter) with a highly select gallery of canine breeds. In between, it offers equally select surveys of animal habitats, physical characteristics, family life, defense mechanisms and other topics. The writing sometimes reads like a bad translation: "A hippo can extend its mouth to 180 degrees." The snippets of text are placed around or within intensely hued images that are mostly solid, stylized animal silhouettes, but unlike the ingeniously designed graphics in Margaret Hynes and Andy Crisp's Picture This! Animals (2014), here the art is seldom arranged or scaled to impart information in a visual way. Aside from, for instance, a toothbrush "graph" comparing the numbers of various creatures' teeth or silhouettes running around a marked speed gauge, Blechman's illustrations just place animals in decorative groupings or next to conventional lists and bar graphs. Flashy at first glance, routine at second and subsequent looks. (Nonfiction. 11-13)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763671228
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
04/08/2014
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
769,370
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Simon Rogers is the founding editor of the Guardian’s Datablog and has won numerous awards for his work, including a Royal Statistical Society’s award of excellence in 2012.

Nicholas Blechman is an internationally recognized illustrator, designer, and art director. His award-winning illustrations have appeared in GQ, Travel + Leisure, Wired, and the New Yorker. He is currently the art director of the New York Times Book Review.

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Information Graphics: Animal Kingdom 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
readerbynight More than 1 year ago
Information Graphics - Understand the facts in the blink of an eye. This colorful, entertaining yet educational book comes in tabbed sections for ease of finding the information you want. Such sections as Species, Senses, Record Breakers, and so on. An encyclopedia of information on a small scale, but with a lot of what children might want to know. It may come as a surprise just how much can be covered in this book. With Information Graphics, and Nicholas Blechman's splendid contribution to format and illustration, the information is right before your eyes in graphic form, for instance the Hippo visible on the cover clearly shows that it has the largest mouth and the Pelican can just as obviously show that his mouth (beak) can 'hold more than his belly can'. The pages will hold up to wear and tear, made of stiff stock. Not only will children learn about vertebrates and invertebrates, cold-blooded and warm-blooded, but such things as what animal can hold its breath the longest, what animal has the largest brain (no, it's not a human), how does a Hammerhead Shark see, what animal has the biggest mouth and which one has the longest tongue. Other sections can tell you how much water a camel can drink in what amount of time. Kids will love this book for both the graphics and the odd things they will learn. Recommended for children 6-9, I think some a bit younger and some a bit older myself because of the interesting facts. A great way to see the world of animals in a memorable way.