Initial Teacher Training: The Dialogue of Ideology and Culture

Initial Teacher Training: The Dialogue of Ideology and Culture

by Margaret Wilkin Educational Researcher, The Research Unit, Homerton College, Cambridge.
     
 

This text provides an account of the relationship between successive British governments and the profession of initial teacher training since the 1960s. In the 1970s, the Robbins Report led to the introduction of a curriculum which both structurally and substantively represented the ideology of the day: social democracy. More recent government initiatives have

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Overview

This text provides an account of the relationship between successive British governments and the profession of initial teacher training since the 1960s. In the 1970s, the Robbins Report led to the introduction of a curriculum which both structurally and substantively represented the ideology of the day: social democracy. More recent government initiatives have re-created training in market image.; Currently, this relationship is seen as one-sided, the government apparently dominating the curriculum through a series of legislative measures. The author, however, suggests that a long-term view of this relationship may reveal a different picture - that the relationship is interactive and beneficial to both sides, and can therefore be regarded as a dialogue.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780750705547
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
04/01/1996
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction1
1The Nature of Ideology and of Ideological Practices10
2The 1960s: The Robbins Report and the Ideology of Progress36
3The 1970s: Loss of Ideological Contact71
4The 1980s: Advent of a New Ideology134
Coda: The Early 1990s175
Conclusion182
Appendix188
References195
Index210

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