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Ink
     

Ink

5.0 2
by Sabrina Vourvoulias
 

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What happens when rhetoric about immigrants escalates to an institutionalized population control system? The near-future, dark speculative novel INK opens as a biometric tattoo is approved for use to mark temporary workers, permanent residents and citizens with recent immigration history - collectively known as inks.

Set in a fictional city and small, rural town in

Overview

What happens when rhetoric about immigrants escalates to an institutionalized population control system? The near-future, dark speculative novel INK opens as a biometric tattoo is approved for use to mark temporary workers, permanent residents and citizens with recent immigration history - collectively known as inks.

Set in a fictional city and small, rural town in the U.S. during a 10-year span, the novel is told in four voices: a journalist; an ink who works in a local population control office; an artist strongly tied to a specific piece of land; and a teenager whose mother runs an inkatorium (a sanitarium-internment center opened in response to public health concerns about inks).

The main characters grapple with ever-changing definitions of power, home and community; relationships that expand and complicate their lives; personal magicks they don't fully understand; and perceptions of "otherness" based on ethnicity, language, class and inclusion. In this world, the protagonists' magicks serve and fail, as do all other systems - government, gang, religious organization - until only two things alone stand: love and memory.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Debut author Vourvoulias takes the reader to a future America that has embraced prejudice and instituted a formal caste system. Residents of foreign birth and native-born Americans with too-recent foreign connections are marked with tattoos and tagged with GPS units to separate them from full-status citizens. Sympathetic characters struggle against an unjust system where official abuse facilitates racist vigilantism. Vourvoulias invokes injustices in American history, including the Mexican Repatriation of the 1930s, Jim Crow laws, and the Trail of Tears; this deliberate but never gratuitous connection to the past grants the premise a degree of verisimilitude. Less convincing are the voices of the protagonists, often too similar to be easily distinguished. Despite these occasional stylistic shortcomings, readers will be moved by this call for justice in the future and the present. (Oct.)
Reforma - Judith Falzon
A chilling tale of American apartheid, and the power of love, myth and community.
Publisher's Weekly
Readers will be moved by this call for justice in the future and the present
The Future Fire - Djibril al-Ayad
[Ink] ranges over time, space and magic in a story by turns horrifying, heart-breaking, beautiful, hopeful, frustrating and terribly believable. Vourvoulias’s writing is effortless and effective, uncannily capturing the voices of her disparate protagonists and narrators; not uniformly sympathetic, certainly not always nice, but lucid, convincing and consistent.
La Bloga - Michael Sedano
Readers who allow themselves to be drawn into the fantasy will find Sabrina Vourvoulias’ story both depressing and constantly arresting, enjoying several surprises along the route. In the end comes an inkling of hopefulness for disbanding the tea bagger hold on liberty, but that’s not certain. Vourvoulias won’t let you off that easy."
Elianne Ramos
[Vourvoulias] takes us on a whirlwind, goose-bump-inducing exploration of the dualities of life and death, the light and darkness of the human spirit, the indelibility of ink as both marker and recorder of our lives and the shape-shifting, vile nature of colonialism and bigotry. By the time you reach the novel’s bittersweet ending, you will know: this story is as immortal as the souls of the nahuales of our ancestors’ lore, and perhaps just as powerful.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780615657813
Publisher:
Crossed Genres Publications
Publication date:
06/25/2012
Pages:
236
Sales rank:
539,293
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Sabrina Vourvoulias is a Latina newspaper editor, blogger and writer.

An American citizen from birth, she grew up in Guatemala and first moved to the United States when she was 15. She studied writing and filmmaking at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, N.Y.

In addition to numerous articles and editorial columns in several newspapers in Pennsylvania and New York state, her work has been published in Dappled Things, Graham House Review, La Bloga's Floricanto, Poets Responding to SB 1070, Scheherezade's Bequest at Cabinet des Fees, We'Moon, Crossed Genres #24, the anthologies Fat Girl in a Strange Land and Crossed Genres Year Two, and is slated to appear in upcoming issues of Bull Spec and GUD magazines.

Her blog Following the Lede (http://followingthelede.blogspot.com) was nominated for a 2011 Latinos in Social Media (LATISM) award. She lives in Pennsylvania with her husband and daughter. Follow her antics on Twitter @followthelede.

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Ink 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A lyrical and gripping story of am entirely possible future of love, labels, death and the magical power of transformation, as well as actual magic and transformation.
Talekyn More than 1 year ago
I can't say enough good things about this book. Sabrina Vourvoulias's storytelling style is heartbreaking and joyful at the same time. She alternates between four main points of view, and each character does have a distinct voice and mindset to be explored. The action takes place over quite a number of years as the author's dystopian world grows darker and then lighter. This is the near future, a very possibly real near future, with characters from all walks of life who feel the effects of a darkening society differently but none of whom exists carefree. There is also, as there always is with this author's work, magic worked into the dystopia. The magic is subtle at first, and very grounded, but ultimately plays an important role in shaping events. INK is not a book that fits into easy categorization. It's dysptopia. It's magical realism. It's paranormal. It's a societal analysis. It's all of this and much more. You owe it to yourself to read INK, and see what questions the author raises in your mind ... and to ask yourself, if this society came to pass in my lifetime, where would I fit and what would I do? Would you be one of the INKed?(