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Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology
     

Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology

4.5 2
by Jennifer K. Stuller
 

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Female spies, superheroes, detectives, meta-humans and action heroes in films, comics and television over seven decades, as well as their writers, directors, performers, illustrators and consumers are investigated in this comprehensive, engaging and thought-provoking history, inquiry, critique and reference guide to Ink-stained Amazons and Cinematic

Overview

Female spies, superheroes, detectives, meta-humans and action heroes in films, comics and television over seven decades, as well as their writers, directors, performers, illustrators and consumers are investigated in this comprehensive, engaging and thought-provoking history, inquiry, critique and reference guide to Ink-stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors.

Women have been led to believe that superheroes and heroism are not for them, and that they are little more than love interests, or sidekicks who stand by their supermen. This is a false proposition argues Jennifer K. Stuller, as she uncovers the true history of how super-women are represented in popular culture. She reveals how, from Wonder Woman to Buffy Summers, Emma Peel to Sydney Bristow, Charlie's Angels to The Powerpuff Girls, the female hero in modem mythology has broken through the boys' club barrier of tradition for shining, if all too brief, moments.

The book details the notable differences in how women and men are represented as heroic in modem myth. Love and compassion, spies and sexuality, daddy's girls, and the complicated roles of superwomen who are also mothers are all explored. The spotlight is also turned onto men and women who have created modern myths with a strong female presence and Stuller concludes by speculating on the future of gender representation in superheroic myth.

A useful appendix offers resources for further information about feminist fangirl blogging, activism, and fiction, and the book features a glossary of modem mythic women.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Blogging as Ink-Stained Amazon in the Bitch blogs, Jennifer Stuller took on Barbarella, Lois Lane, and Tura Satana with her blog Girl on Film. With her new book, Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors, you can find even more on kick-ass women in popular culture.”
—Kjerstin Johnson, Bitch Magazine (online)

“Female heroes abound in literature, film and all walks of life, although most people don’t know that they do. Not surprising given how much they challenge the gender roles in which women and girls have historically been confined. This wonderful book shows female heroes breaking out of gender boxes left and right and illuminates new possibilities for the indomitable hero in all of us.”
—Kathleen Noble, Ph.D., author of The Sound of the Silver Horn: Reclaiming the heroism in contemporary women’s lives.

“Once upon a time — only a few years ago, actually — women could turn on their TV sets and glory in the adventures of Buffy, Xena, Sydney Bristow, Dana Scully, and many more strong, ass-kicking women. Today there is not one show on the small screen that stars a female action hero. What happened? Comics are not much better. Aside from the occasional exception (for which we are grateful) like Birds of Prey, and women writers like Ivory Madison (The Huntress) and Gail Simone’s newly feminist interpretation of Wonder Woman, most comic book action heroines continue to be male-written and drawn creations whose breasts are bigger then their personalities. Now along comes Jennifer Stuller, with her very entertaining book, Ink-Stained Amazons, to explore the whys and wherefores of pop culture super women, and perhaps jolt us all into demanding more and stronger women characters. Thank you, Jennifer. We need those role models!”
—Trina Robbins author of From Girls to Grrrlz: A History of Women's Comics from Teens to Zines

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781845119652
Publisher:
I. B.Tauris & Company, Limited
Publication date:
02/02/2010
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Jennifer K. Stuller is a writer and journalist, specializing in gender and sexuality in popular culture. She has been researching and speaking internationally on superwomen for over a decade, and has contributed to such publications as Geek Monthly, Washington CEO and the Encyclopedia of Gender and Society. Stuller also teaches at the University of Washington, her alma mater, and maintains two blogs: Ink-Stained Traveler and Ink-Stained Amazon. She lives in Seattle, Washington.

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Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Miss_X More than 1 year ago
I have always been in love with entertainment that features women. A huge fan of television shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Xena, I was very pleased with the coverage in this book. I originally purchased it hoping to find some inspiration for my personal writing and was happy with the breadth of topics covered. I really liked how it dealt with historical facts about each time period the shows aired. I could really feel the author's love affair with her subject matter...especially when Buffy came up...several times. I appreciated the time spent on both mainstream and older, non-mainstream, even foreign television shows, films, comic books, and magazines. This book definitely gave me new ways to read feminism in our media. It doesn't just deal with sci-fi and fantasy either. I couldn't wait to turn the page to read more about shows like Veronica Mars, Alias, pretty much anything that included strong female leads. I actually would have preferred more time be spent with them, as they are deeply rooted in reality, unlike my favorite sci-fi shows, thus giving me more inspiration to write something that can actually be produced on a budget. But ultimately, the book is not a writing of why the author loves these shows...its about showing the qualities that make these shows valuable, lovable, and relevant to empowering future generations of women. It puts a spotlight on how we see and are seen in media, in a very well written, readable way.
webbish6 More than 1 year ago
This book is a fascinating read if you are at all interested in superheroines and powerful women - Buffy, Xena, Sydney Bristow et al - and their relationships with power, with the fathers and mothers, and with us, their audiences. Definitely on the list for anyone who is interested in researching modern day Amazons.