The Inland Sea

The Inland Sea

by Donald Richie, Pico Iyer
     
 

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"Earns its place on the very short shelf of books on Japan that are of permanent value."—Times Literary Supplement.

"Richie is a stupendous travel writer; the book shines with bright witticisms, deft characterizations of fisherfolk, merchants, monks and wistful adolescents, and keen comparisons of Japanes and Western culture." —San

Overview

"Earns its place on the very short shelf of books on Japan that are of permanent value."—Times Literary Supplement.

"Richie is a stupendous travel writer; the book shines with bright witticisms, deft characterizations of fisherfolk, merchants, monks and wistful adolescents, and keen comparisons of Japanes and Western culture." —San Francisco Chronicle

"A learned, beautifully paced elegy."—London Review of Books

Sheltered between Japan’s major islands lies the Inland Sea, a place modernity passed by. In this classic travel memoir, Donald Richie embarks on a quest to find Japan’s timeless heart among its mysterious waters and forgotten islands. This edition features an introduction by Pico Iyer, photographs from the award-winning PBS documentary, and a new afterword. First published in 1971, The Inland Sea is a lucid, tender voyage of discovery and self-revelation.

Donald Richie is the foremost authority on Japanese culture and cinema with 40+ books in print.

Editorial Reviews

Vincent Canby
Mr. Richie's book is of a breadth and richness that underscore the inadequacy of categorizing it as a travel book.
New York Times
Times Literary Supplement
This book earns its place on the very short shelf of books on Japan that are of permanent value.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781880656693
Publisher:
Stone Bridge Press
Publication date:
09/01/2002
Edition description:
This expanded edition of Donald Richie's
Pages:
260
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.20(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt

From Shodo the islands begin. They stretch westward, hundreds of them, almost as far as the large southern island of Kyushu. The sea is like a lake. The wind ruffles the surface; the water looks shallow. The islands ride upon its lightly broken surface. The boats move back and forth, lines of choppy waves diverging, the wakes like furrows after a plow. It is late afternoon. The port islands catch the sun. Each detail--a rock, a tree, a stretch of sand--stands out, clear, sharp-edged. The starboard islands, the sun behind, are outlines. The nearest is almost black, those farther away a dark gray, the ones behind them purplish, until--islands piled like low thunderheads--the farthest pale into a watered blue, deepest toward the crest, almost white where their far shores meet the horizon.

Meet the Author


Donald Richie has been writing about Japan for over 50 years from his base in Tokyo and is the author of over 40 books and hundreds of essays and reviews. He is widely admired for his incisive film studies on Ozu and Kurosawa, and for his stylish and incisive observations on Japanese culture.

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