Inner Drives: How to Write and Create Characters Using the Eight Classic Centers of Motivation

Inner Drives: How to Write and Create Characters Using the Eight Classic Centers of Motivation

5.0 11
by Pamela Jaye Smith
     
 

Inspiring and practical, Inner Drives goes to the very source of character motivation and action. Explores the fascinating world of archetypes, mythology, and the chakra system.

Overview

Inspiring and practical, Inner Drives goes to the very source of character motivation and action. Explores the fascinating world of archetypes, mythology, and the chakra system.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932907032
Publisher:
Wiese, Michael Productions
Publication date:
06/25/2005
Pages:
239
Product dimensions:
5.96(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.57(d)

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Inner Drives: How to Write and Create Characters Using the Eight Classic Centers of Motivation 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Within a few minutes of reading Inner Drives, I intinctively knew it was going to give me unlimited potential to improve my process forever, both in acting and screenwriting. That was over a year ago and I still read and reread it everyday. An old soul trapped inside me has been set free to create the art I need to show the world. If you have a burning desire to contribute stories that inspire caring, sharing, and growth¿BUT ARE LOST AND FRUSTRATED¿ Inner Drives will give you an amazing base to start working from. Pamela Jaye Smith¿s perceptions are like food for the brain and she¿s tailored the learning process to allow any reader¿s process to thrive in the mix. If you¿re an actor lost in finding a process that works for you, this book will hone your imagination razor sharp and rescue your passion for the craft. Acting classes stress the importance of homework but what does that mean? Where do you start? What is homework? Does creating character biographies seem like guesswork? Do you say your lines a million times in your room hoping for magic to pop out? If so, I urge you to read and reread Inner Drives. Use it like a workbook and watch what starts coming out. Centering your characters using the Chakras will open up a whole new creative world you did not know existed. If you¿re a screenwriter who¿s stuck staring at a blank page, take some time out and start reading Inner Drives. Soak up the Chakras centres, swim in the duality of Sliding Scales, and play with the Pairs of Centres. Feed your imagination to find out what motivates your characters and how you need to test them. Pamela Jaye Smith gives you a map to find the hidden treasures in your storytelling. Mythological archytypes resonate deep within the human chord allowing rich characters, both flawed and fantastic, to show up on the page. Sean O¿Brian, Actor, Screenwriter
Guest More than 1 year ago
Usually I'm pretty ashamed to admit I've bought a writing book, as usually they're pretty useless, superficial, or just...well, not helpful at all. It's an odd thing to have a writing book not help you learn how to write better, but I suppose that's because you only learn from experience. Yet, this book is amazing and actually aids you in developing yhour characters realisitically, explaining motives and personalities and letting you fill in the blanks in a way, but moreso in your own creativity. Amazing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is destined to be the Holy Grail for actors 'you'll get the pun if you read the book.' Like Shurtleff's 'Audition,' Ms. Smith's 'Inner Drives' will give you an objective system into which you can put your emotions, your acting chops, in short, everything you've learned or failed to learn from acting school. It will be your guide on how to be 'interesting' 'after all, who likes a dull actor?' It does this by showing you how you/your character fits into the story, and what your character's motivations will be. And it is a very fun read. The first two chapters are introductory. Go to the third and try it. I was startled with where it took me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Inner Drives is the perfect tool to gain a greater grasp on who we are, what we do, why we do it and from where that all originates from. Pamela Jaye Smith has created a clear and concise working model of linking all that we are to all that we do using the energy center chakras of our system. With examples from film scripts and characters, she has clearly illustrated the link between intention and motivation. With the tools in Inner Works I feel that I am ten steps ahead in creating characters as a writer and playing characters as an actor with a greater laser like precision. More than just for entertainment professionals, I believe this book is a valuable asset to anyone who is seeking to gain a better grasp on humanity and the present state of the world today. As we evolve toward a greater sense of wholeness, for a better future, who better than a mythology expert to connect the unseen dots of past, present and an unlimited future. The intelligence provided within these pages elevates my own perspective of humanity as a whole
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an amazing book! I am fascinated by the chakras, have read extensively about them and studied them in various practices. Ms. Smith's practical handbook to understanding and using these energy centers to tell better stories, is coherent. deep and insightful. INNER DRIVES is a valuable source book for creating richer, more penetrating characters and, as a result, more involving plots.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pamela Jaye Smith's ground-breaking book is the first to connect the exciting field of subtle energy and esoteric anatomy with a character's motivation, style, and archetype. By showing how the chakra system affects behavior, she offers writers new pathways to creating authentic, multi-dimentional, and unforgettable personalities. This is a must read for new-millennium screenwriters, breaking new ground in screenwriting. The inspired techniques for character development, described in 'Inner Drives,' go hand-in-hand with the stories we need to tell, to break through old paradigms and move into new possibilities in story telling. This book is a treasure. I highly recommend 'Inner Drives!' Celeste Allegrea Adams Author, 'Keepers of the Dream'
Guest More than 1 year ago
From Braveheart to brain research, mystery schools to the martial arts, Poltergeist to prana, Pamela Jaye Smith's book INNER DRIVES distills a wealth of information in a way that makes the archetypal dimensions readable and accessible. Her writing style is exciting and delightful. I commend her work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pamela Jaye Smith has an incredible talent for inspiring writers to dig deep into the core of their characters, which invariably leads them to discovering their own personal nuggets of truth. She has an encyclopedic knowledge of mythology, spirituality and metaphysics. Yet her real gift is being able to relate all of this amazing information in an entertaining and clear manner so that it's easy to understand. The book is very well organized and packed with all kinds of valuable treasures. I highly recommend it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading 'Inner Drives' -- I came away with much needed insight about how to 'become the character' you're writing... How they think, how they dress, act, react and talk -- and most importantly, how others might interact with them. Honestly, if you want to get into he 'head' of your character, this is the book for you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 'Inner Drives,' Pamela Jaye Smith mines ancient wisdom and compellingly offers up a system of concepts about human motivation that is as valid today as it was thousands of years ago. These astute insights into human character are wonderfully useful tools for today's storytellers, a category which includes not only writers, but also directors, actors, and designers. These concepts can be (and have already been) put to work in any type of narrative, be it a screenplay, a novel, a theatre piece, an opera, or a short story. I believe this system would also be a useful asset in documentary projects, and it will undoubtedly work in my own field of Digital Storytelling¿ the use of interactive digital media to tell new kinds of dramatic narratives. In fact, Ms. Smith offers up a number of examples from video games. The system Ms. Smith describes is based on the Eight Classic Centers of Motivation. In Sanskrit, these centers are called the chakras, but other cultures have other names for them. I was amazed to learn how many peoples throughout the world and in different time periods came up with the same general system to understand human nature. She makes a thoroughly convincing case for the universality of this system, and its fundamental accuracy, based as it is on human physiology. For those of us who are writers, this classic system can be used to answer the a question we are always asking ourselves: 'What makes this particular character tick?' This system gives us the God-like power of creating lifelike characters who seem to feel, think and breathe. And we can also use it to populate entire casts of characters -- ones destined to hate each other, to become allies, or to fall in love. The book abounds with concrete illustrations of characters drawn from various narrative works, familiar characters like Scarlett O'Hara, Rocky and Stanley Kowalski, as well as real people like Charles Manson and Napolean Bonaparte. The examples help make what might at first seem to be an abstract approach to character develpment extremely understandable and usable. I believe 'Inner Drives' is an exciting new way to approach characters and is a wonderful addition to every working writer's library, although as Ms. Smith makes clear, it is not a new system at all, but one that is extremely old.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read and profited from many other screenwriting books, including Story and the various Syd Field offerings, so I was skeptical about the usefulness of another screenwriting book. But this one is really helpful and smart and enjoyable. It has a very practical approach to story creation, with a 'let's-get-down-to-brass-tacks' tone. The author describes a few simple things that suddenly seemed very true, though I hadn't thought of them before. Seems like he's sold a ton of scripts.