The Innocence of Father Brown

The Innocence of Father Brown

3.1 22
by G. K. Chesterton
     
 

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"The Innocence of Father Brown” is the first collection of G. K. Chesterton's masterful mysteries starring Father Brown.
Father Brown is a short, stumpy Catholic priest, "formerly of Cobhole in Essex, and now working in London," with shapeless clothes and a large umbrella, and uncanny insight into human evil.
The bookt contains the following twelve

Overview

"The Innocence of Father Brown” is the first collection of G. K. Chesterton's masterful mysteries starring Father Brown.
Father Brown is a short, stumpy Catholic priest, "formerly of Cobhole in Essex, and now working in London," with shapeless clothes and a large umbrella, and uncanny insight into human evil.
The bookt contains the following twelve thrilling tales:
THE BLUE CROSS;
THE SECRET GARDEN;
THE QUEER FEET;
THE FLYING STARS;
THE INVISIBLE MAN;
THE HONOUR OF ISRAEL GOW;
THE WRONG SHAPE;
THE SINS OF PRINCE SARADINE;
THE HAMMER OF GOD;
THE EYE OF APOLLO;
THE SIGN OF THE BROKEN SWORD;
THE THREE TOOLS OF DEATH.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014659949
Publisher:
Rex Press
Publication date:
06/21/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
198
File size:
244 KB

Meet the Author

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936) was an English writer. His prolific and diverse output included philosophy, ontology, poetry, plays, journalism, public lectures and debates, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton has been called the "prince of paradox". Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out." For example, Chesterton wrote "Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it."
Chesterton is well known for his reasoned apologetics and even some of those who disagree with him have recognized the universal appeal of such works as Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. Chesterton, as a political thinker, cast aspersions on both progressivism and conservatism, saying, "The whole modern world has divided itself into Conservatives and Progressives. The business of Progressives is to go on making mistakes. The business of the Conservatives is to prevent the mistakes from being corrected." Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify such a position more and more with Catholicism, eventually converting to Roman Catholicism from High Church Anglicanism. George Bernard Shaw, Chesterton's "friendly enemy" according to Time, said of him, "He was a man of colossal genius". Biographers have identified him as a successor to such Victorian authors as Matthew Arnold, Thomas Carlyle, John Henry Cardinal Newman, and John Ruskin.

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The Innocence Of Father Brown 3.1 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version seems to be missing the endings to some chapters.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
Take Sherlock Holmes, lower his intelligence by half (leaving him as still smarter than average) and turn him into a bland Roman Catholic priest who happens to solve a lot of mysteries and you get Father Brown. Some of the mysteries he solves are complex, and the third person narration is occasionally witty (even sarcastic), but I would much rather read Sherlock Holmes or Dupin any day. The author's frequent pot-shots at Protestants/Protestantism are annoying too; some are witty but mostly they just come off as mean-spirited.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has some good points. I like the fact that the main character is more like the priests I have known-- not perfect by any means, but certainly not the current fad of portraying them all as hypocritical dogmatists. The brevity of the stories is also welcome. They can each be easily read in one sitting. Generally entertaining in themselves, I found them also to be not unlike fables (parables?) in that each had a small moral to it (even if the moral was as simple as "Be good"). On the negative side, some of the stories are a bit bland. All in all, though, I would recommend the book.
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Too many typos
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Mark Krudwig More than 1 year ago
Chesterton's Father Brown stories are not as complex as those of Christie or Doyle, but they are easy reads on a summer afternoon. It's nice to have a collection of them in one ebook. However, the layout on this ebook is terrible. The lines consistently wrap in odd places on my Nook Color. The font looks like one of the old monospaced typewriter fonts.