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The Innocence Of Father Brown
     

The Innocence Of Father Brown

3.1 22
by G. K. Chesterton
 

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Shortly after the publication of ORTHODOXY, G. K. Chesterton moved from London to Beaconsfield, where he met Father O'Connor. It was the combination of Father O'Connor's shrewd insights to the darker side of man's nature together with his mild appearance that suggested to Chesterton a character that became the unassuming, pudding-faced Father Brown.

Numerous short

Overview

Shortly after the publication of ORTHODOXY, G. K. Chesterton moved from London to Beaconsfield, where he met Father O'Connor. It was the combination of Father O'Connor's shrewd insights to the darker side of man's nature together with his mild appearance that suggested to Chesterton a character that became the unassuming, pudding-faced Father Brown.

Numerous short stories followed. All of them featuring this priest who appeared to know nothing yet in fact knew more about criminals than they knew about themselves. THE INNOCENCE OF FATHER BROWN is the first collection of these stories.

"Father Brown is a direct challenge to the conventional detective and in many ways he is more amusing and ingenious." (Saturday Review)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781557424242
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Publication date:
10/10/2005
Series:
Father Brown Series
Pages:
188
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.56(d)

Meet the Author

GK Chesterton was born in London in 1874 and educated at St Paul’s School, before studying art at the Slade School. In 1896, he began working for the London publisher, Redway, and also T. Fisher Unwin as a reader where he remained until 1902. During this time he undertook his first freelance journalistic assignments, writing art and literary reviews. He also contributed regular columns to two newspapers: ‘The Speaker’ (along with his friend Hilaire Belloc) and the ‘Daily News’. Throughout his life he contributed further articles to journals, particularly ‘The Bookman’ and ‘The Illustrated London News’.

His first two books, poetry collections, were published in 1900. These were followed by collections of essays and in 1903, and his most substantial work to that point, a study of ‘Robert Browning’. Chesterton's first novel, 'The Napoleon of Notting Hill' was published in 1904. In this book he developed his political attitudes in which he attacked socialism, big business and technology and showed how they become the enemies of freedom and justice. These were themes which were to run throughout his other works. 'The Man who was Thursday' was published in 1908 and is perhaps the novel most difficult to understand, although it is also his most popular. 'The Ball and the Cross' followed in 1910 and 'Manalive' in 1912. Chesterton's best-known fictional character appears in the Father Brown stories, the first of the collection, 'The Innocence of Father Brown', being published in 1911. Brown is a modest Catholic priest who uses careful psychology to put himself in the place of the criminal in order to solve the crime.

His output was prolific, with a great variety of books from brilliant studies of ‘Dickens’, ‘Shaw’, and ‘RL Stevenson’ to literary criticism. He also produced more poetry and many volumes of political, social and religious essays. Tremendous zest and energy, with a mastery of paradox, puns, a robust humour and forthright devotion along with great intelligence characterise his entire output. In the years prior to 1914 his fame was at its height, being something of a celebrity and seen as a latter day Dr Johnson as he frequented the pubs and offices of Fleet Street. His huge figure was encased in a cloak and wide brimmed hat, with pockets full of papers and proofs.

Chesterton came from a nominally Anglican family and had been baptized into the Church of England. However, at that point he had no particular Christian belief and was in fact agnostic for a time. Nevertheless, in his late twenties he began to explore the possibility of a religious belief for himself, which he then discovered already existed as orthodox Christianity. In 1896, he had also met Frances Alice Blogg, marrying in 1901. She was a devout Anglican and her beliefs strengthened his Christian convictions. In 1922 he converted to Catholicism and he explores his belief in many works, the best known of which is 'Orthodoxy', his personal spiritual odyssey. In some ways, 'Orthodoxy' was an answer to earlier criticisms received after the 1905 publication of 'Heretics', which was a collection of studies of the then contemporary writers. The complaint was made that Chesterton discussed these writers’ attitudes to life, but offered nothing in respect of himself. He was an ebullient character, absent-minded, but quick-witted and will be remembered as one of the most colourful and provocative writers of his day.

G.K. Chesterton died in 1936.

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The Innocence Of Father Brown 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version seems to be missing the endings to some chapters.
Joel_M More than 1 year ago
Take Sherlock Holmes, lower his intelligence by half (leaving him as still smarter than average) and turn him into a bland Roman Catholic priest who happens to solve a lot of mysteries and you get Father Brown. Some of the mysteries he solves are complex, and the third person narration is occasionally witty (even sarcastic), but I would much rather read Sherlock Holmes or Dupin any day. The author's frequent pot-shots at Protestants/Protestantism are annoying too; some are witty but mostly they just come off as mean-spirited.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has some good points. I like the fact that the main character is more like the priests I have known-- not perfect by any means, but certainly not the current fad of portraying them all as hypocritical dogmatists. The brevity of the stories is also welcome. They can each be easily read in one sitting. Generally entertaining in themselves, I found them also to be not unlike fables (parables?) in that each had a small moral to it (even if the moral was as simple as "Be good"). On the negative side, some of the stories are a bit bland. All in all, though, I would recommend the book.
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Too many typos
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Mark Krudwig More than 1 year ago
Chesterton's Father Brown stories are not as complex as those of Christie or Doyle, but they are easy reads on a summer afternoon. It's nice to have a collection of them in one ebook. However, the layout on this ebook is terrible. The lines consistently wrap in odd places on my Nook Color. The font looks like one of the old monospaced typewriter fonts.