Innovation Ecosystems

Overview

The capacity to innovate is a fundamental resource for organizations as well as the true wealth of a society. To contribute' fully to the prosperity of an organization, region or country, the innovation process - which is not only technology-based - requires the implementation of knowledge dynamics between domains that are often treated in isolation. This dynamic is based on a synergy between humans and intelligent machines.

For several years, innovation has been omnipresent and...

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Overview

The capacity to innovate is a fundamental resource for organizations as well as the true wealth of a society. To contribute' fully to the prosperity of an organization, region or country, the innovation process - which is not only technology-based - requires the implementation of knowledge dynamics between domains that are often treated in isolation. This dynamic is based on a synergy between humans and intelligent machines.

For several years, innovation has been omnipresent and part of strategic matters. The word "innovation" is in the headlines of reports, articles and business media, arid is also the subject of events, projects, think tanks, clubs and blogs. Several forums on social networks are devoted to its various facets. It is a global phenomenon.

This book introduces the concept of "e-co-innovation" which brings a better understanding of the successful transition from idea to reality and ultimate value. The motivation behind this book is to. introduce a global and system overview of the subject, to present the various aspects of innovation from different angles and perspectives to finally bring the reader to an understanding of all ecosystem components, their metamorphoses, cross-influences and possible impacts on the balanced development of people, businesses, regions and countries.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848213258
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 12/6/2011
  • Series: ISTE Series , #591
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword xi

Introduction xiii

Chapter 1 Global Landscape of Innovation 1

1.1 Innovation in the world 1

1.1.1 The United States of America 4

1.1.2 Japan 7

1.1.3 Soviet Union and Russia 9

1.1.4 Poland 12

1.1.5 Israel 14

1.1.6 China 15

1.1.7 India 17

1.2 Innovation in Europe 18

1.2.1 The Swiss model 23

1.3 Innovation in France 23

1.3.1 Innovation and small businesses. Is small still beautiful? 27

1.4 The future of innovation 29

Chapter 2 A Multi-faceted Innovation 31

2.1 The pieces of the kaleidoscope 31

2.2 From invention to innovation 32

2.3 A few definitions of innovation 34

2.4 Innovation spectrum 38

2.4.1 Incremental and radical innovation 38

2.4.2 Closed innovation 41

2.4.3 Open innovation 42

2.4.4 Collaborative innovation or co-innovation 44

2.4.5 Product innovation and service innovation 45

2.4.6 Organizational innovation 47

2.4.7 Cultural innovation 51

2.4.8 Social innovation 51

2.4.9 Cognitive innovation 52

2.4.10 Economic innovation 53

2.4.11 Educational innovation 54

2.4.12 Innovation centered on the needs of the customer 54

2.4.13 Eco-innovation 55

2.4.14 Global innovation 55

2.5 Innovation paradoxes 56

2.5.1 Paradox of novelty 56

2.5.2 Productivity paradox 56

2.5.3 Organizational paradox 56

2.5.4 Innovate, yes, but not too much 57

2.5.5 Innovation and small businesses 57

2.5.6 Multidisciplinary paradox 58

Chapter 3 From Innovation to E-co-innovation 59

3.1 Awakening consciousness 59

3.2 The traditional innovation process 61

3.2.1 Creativity 62

3.2.2 The lifecycle of an idea 67

3.2.3 Conditions of success 68

3.3 Why and when innovate? 69

3.4 Role of the customer in the innovation process 70

3.4.1 Need engineering 70

3.4.2 Inventing new needs 75

3.5 Integrating environmental aspects 76

3.5.1 Innovating in eco-activities 79

3.5.2 Thinking differently 80

3.6 E-co-innovation or innovating differently 82

3.7 Innovating in a knowledge economy 87

Chapter 4 Knowledge and Skills to E-co-innovate 89

4.1 Information or knowledge? 89

4.2 The knowledge necessary to innovate 90

4.2.1 Knowledge of the context-watch and business intelligence 91

4.2.2 Knowledge of customers and of future customers 94

4.2.3 Knowledge for creativity 97

4.2.4 Knowledge in problem solving 98

4.2.5 Professional knowledge 99

4.2.6 Knowledge of ICTs 100

4.2.7 Environmental knowledge 101

4.2.8 Managerial knowledge 102

4.2.9 Knowledge of intellectual property protection 102

4.2.10 Knowledge in project funding 103

4.3 Which skills are essential to e-co-innovate? 104

4.3.1 The innovation culture 106

4.3.2 For a successful e-co-innovation 107

4.4 Measuring the organizational capacity to innovate 110

4.5 Mobilizing imagination, collective intelligence and technology 113

Chapter 5 Knowledge Management - Collective Human-Machine Intelligence 115

5.1 Amplifying intelligence 115

5.2 The role of computers in the e-co-innovation process 116

5.2.1 Amplifying the capacity to innovate 117

5.2.2 Knowledge processing via computer 118

5.2.3 From artificial intelligence to KM 127

5.3 Knowledge management 128

5.3.1 A few definitions 129

5.3.2 KM and management 130

5.3.3 KM and information processing 132

5.3.4 KM and skills 133

5.3.5 KM and innovation 135

5.3.6 KM and risk management 135

5.4 Building knowledge flow 136

5.4.1 Strategic approach 136

5.4.2 Corporate knowledge: a global approach 136

5.4.3 Application approach 137

5.4.4 What to choose? 141

Chapter 6 Innovating Technological Innovation 143

6.1 Researchers, R&D and innovation 143

6.2 Technological innovation actors 148

6.3 Contexts and ambitions 149

6.3.1 European policies 150

6.3.2 Policies in France 153

6.4 Motivations, evaluations and promotion 154

6.4.1 Evaluation criteria of the researchers 155

6.4.2 Other motivations 161

6.4.3 Ambitions of the CNRS 161

6.5 What is the role of education? 163

6.5.1 University ranking 164

6.6 Some initiatives to transform technological innovation in economic values 165

6.6.1 Creation of companies by researchers 165

6.6.2 Business breeding-grounds and incubators 166

6.6.3 Technology parks and competitiveness clusters 167

6.6.4 Grouping of technology parks - Archs and Euromed 168

6.6.5 European Research Area 169

6.6.6 Education: training of future entrepreneurs 170

6.6.7 KIZ 171

6.7 Financing and return on investment 172

6.8 Proposal: technological innovation in the knowledge economy 179

6.8.1 Which approach? 181

6.8.2 What funding? 182

6.8.3 Innovating in evaluations and in measures of progress and impact 184

6.8.4 Using methods and techniques of knowledge processing 185

6.8.5 Education and training 185

6.9 The future of research 187

Chapter 7 Innovation for Territorial Development 189

7.1 The economic situation of regions and cities 189

7.2 Strategies and actions in favor of regional development 195

7.2.1 Industry 198

7.2.2 Building the France of tomorrow 201

7.3 Some initiatives in favor of territorial growth by innovation 204

7.3.1 Innovation contests 205

7.3.2 Other initiatives 207

7.4 Removing obstacles to development 210

7.5 Development in the knowledge economy 214

7.5.1 The importance of a shared vision 215

7.5.2 Thinking global 216

7.5.3 Harnessing the ICT 218

7.5.4 Some proposals for change of logic 218

7.6 Innovating for a prosperous future 219

Inventing the Future 221

Glossary 223

Bibliography 227

Index 245

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