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Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything
     

Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything

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by Steven Levy
 

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The Story Behind the Macintosh Computer

INSANELY GREAT: THE LIFE & TIMES OF MACINTOSH covers the research and development that led to the first 128K Mac and the struggles involved to make the continued evolution of the Macintosh possible. Predecessors of the Mac and ideas that made their way into the first computer with a smiling start-up screen are

Overview

The Story Behind the Macintosh Computer

INSANELY GREAT: THE LIFE & TIMES OF MACINTOSH covers the research and development that led to the first 128K Mac and the struggles involved to make the continued evolution of the Macintosh possible. Predecessors of the Mac and ideas that made their way into the first computer with a smiling start-up screen are discussed in loving detail (the author is a big fan of the Macintosh) -- the mouse, icons and other discoveries that revolutionized the way people work with computers.

Along the way, the reader gets a sense of the people who contributed to the various Macintosh teams: Steve Jobs, with his "reality-distortion field" that prodded the team to create the near-impossible; John Sculley, the former Pepsi CEO brought in to facilitate the growing up of the Apple company; and many other key members of the Macintosh teams including Bill Atkinson, the genius behind MacPaint and later, HyperCard.

As it turns out, Bill Atkinson did not originally plan for a menu bar on top of the screen. It sort of migrated upward, like cream rising to the top. Atkinson wanted the commands to be geographically predictable, the same place in every application. For that reason, he rejected pop-up windows [as had been used in Xerox's PARC computers]. Then he got the idea of a menu bar -- a constant presence from which one could evoke a menu of commands by pointing and clicking. At first he put the bar at the bottom of the active window, then after some testing moved it to the top. But putting the menu bar on top of a window presented a problem: when the user shrank the size of the window, you couldn't get the headings to fit. (Microsoft's Windows uses this approach, and suffers by it.) So finally, at [user-testing fanatic Larry] Tesler's urging, he moved it to the top of the screen. Users quickly learned where the commands were under the individual headings. Atkinson was impressed that they could implicitly visualize where a command might "live" on the screen, moving the mouse over the heading, dropping down the menu and going right to the location in one fell swoop. It was a case of totally internalizing the illusion of geography in cyberspace -- you would "go" to a menu choice that didn't really exist until you created it.

Steven Levy's INSANELY GREAT isn't only the chronicle of a single machine; it's a chapter in the story of the personal computer's ongoing evolution. Readers who may have never used a computer without icons or a trash can (or Recycle Bin) may want to learn how the Macintosh made the computers and operating systems that followed its introduction were made possible.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This sensible and entertaining book outlines ``how technology, serendipity, passion, and magic combined to create . . . the most important consumer product in the last half of the twentieth century: the Macintosh computer.'' Levy ( Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution ) describes the travails that beset Apple, the company run by Steven Jobs that created the Mac--``dippy new-age culture,'' a ``mission from God'' mentality and a Silicon Valley image. ``What's the difference between Apple and Boy Scouts?'' he queries, reviving a long-running joke. Answer: ``The Boy Scouts have adult supervision.'' And Levy's view of Jobs himself seems reasonable: ``a con man,'' and ``a slick marketer'' whose impulsive management style and overbearing ego ``drove people crazy.'' As the author recounts, in 1985 Apple's directors forced Jobs out; he left Apple while creating a new comuter company, Next. ``It made no dent in the universe,'' Levy reports. John Sculley replaced Jobs, but he too was relieved of his position as CEO in 1993, when Apple's directors judged him ``too much a visionary.'' This solid work adroitly covers the information age. (Jan.)
Library Journal
``Insanely great'' was the kind of personal computer that Steve Jobs wanted his group at Apple to develop. As he recounts the history and development of the Mac, Levy concludes that they were successful. As opinionated as his treatment of computer hackers ( Hackers , LJ 11/1/84), this book is one of the first to give credit to some of the lesser-known individuals responsible for the basic research in this field --in particular, Levy acknowledges the substantial contributions of Douglas Engelbart, including the conception and demonstration of the first mouse and of windows. Levy's final chapter on technology and productivity alone is worth the price of the book; all his points are well taken. This is sure to be a popular publication.-- Hilary D. Burton, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Cal.
Booknews
In celebration of the Macintosh's tenth anniversary, explores the conceptual background of the innovative personal computer and the histories of the people who were responsible for it. Levy has written widely about computers and is a columnist for MacWorld. No index. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140232370
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/1995
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.72(h) x 0.57(d)

Meet the Author

Steven Levy is the author of Hackers, which has been in print for more than fifteen years, as well as Insanely Great: The Life & Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything. He is also Newsweek's chief technology writer and has been a contributing writer to Wired since its inception. He lives in New York City with his wife and son.

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Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer That Changed Everything 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
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