Insanity, Individuals, and Society in Late-Medieval English Literature: The Subject of Madness

Insanity, Individuals, and Society in Late-Medieval English Literature: The Subject of Madness

by Stephen Harper
     
 

It is the very paucity of historical evidence regarding medieval concepts of insanity, says Harper (communication studies, U. of Glasgow-Crighton) that has opened the door to the myriad studies of it, professional and amateur, in academic disciplines ranging from the history of psychiatry, literary criticism, and philosophy, to apparently communications. He delves… See more details below

Overview

It is the very paucity of historical evidence regarding medieval concepts of insanity, says Harper (communication studies, U. of Glasgow-Crighton) that has opened the door to the myriad studies of it, professional and amateur, in academic disciplines ranging from the history of psychiatry, literary criticism, and philosophy, to apparently communications. He delves beneath the official medieval view that the mad had lost divine guidance and turned away from God, to consider the context of the utterances about madness, and the individual voices speaking. He concludes that opinions were as varied in the Middle Ages as they are now. The text is double spaced. Annotation ©2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780773467521
Publisher:
Mellen, Edwin Press, The
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Preface
Introduction: Modern Perspectives on Madness in the Later Middle Ages1
Ch. 1Madness in the Late Middle Ages: Conventions, Practices and Attitudes29
Ch. 2'Knightes that ar so wood': The Meanings of Madness in Middle English Romance75
Ch. 3'Reson en Bestialite': Madness, Animality and Social Class in Book 1 of Gower's Vox Clamantis105
Ch. 4'Thou mayst nat werken after thyn owene heed': Madness and Rationality in Chaucer's Miller's and Summoner's tales135
Ch. 5'By cowntynaunce it is not wist': Thomas Hoccleve and the Subject of Madness173
Ch. 6'So euyl to rewlyn': Madness and Authority in The Book of Margery Kempe221
Conclusions275
Primary Bibliography281
Secondary Bibliography287
Index311

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