Insect Behavior / Edition 2 by Robert W. Matthews, Janice R. Matthews | | 9789400790704 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Insect Behavior / Edition 2

Insect Behavior / Edition 2

by Robert W. Matthews, Janice R. Matthews
     
 

ISBN-10: 9400790708

ISBN-13: 9789400790704

Pub. Date: 11/14/2014

Publisher: Springer Netherlands

For thirty years, Insect Behavior served as students sole overview of a field of study that is growing exponentially. Considerably updated and expanded, this second edition still retains its constructive balance between modern developments and historical insights, between new examples and old, between empirical work and theory, and between pertinent conclusions and

Overview

For thirty years, Insect Behavior served as students sole overview of a field of study that is growing exponentially. Considerably updated and expanded, this second edition still retains its constructive balance between modern developments and historical insights, between new examples and old, between empirical work and theory, and between pertinent conclusions and the dynamic field and laboratory experiences from which such discoveries arise. Twenty-six case studies, 45 new color plates and more then 170 figures (over 40% of them new) with detailed legends add richness to the well-written, accessible text.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789400790704
Publisher:
Springer Netherlands
Publication date:
11/14/2014
Edition description:
2nd ed. 2010
Pages:
514
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 1.07(d)

Table of Contents

1 The History and Scope of Insect Behavior 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.1.1 What Is Insect Behavior? 1

1.1.2 Insect Behavior's Biological Context 3

1.1.3 Historical Foundations 6

1.1.4 The Watershed Years 9

1.1.5 The Rise of Ethology 13

1.2 Conceptual Frameworks 15

1.2.1 Evolution by Natural Selection 15

1.2.2 Genetics and Behavior 17

1.2.3 The Comparative Approach 24

1.2.4 Conceptual Pitfalls 25

1.3 Phylogeny's Role 28

1.3.1 Microevolution and Macroevolution 28

1.3.2 Phylogenetic Systematics and Cladistics 33

1.3.3 Behavior and Speciation 36

1.4 Questions and Perspectives 38

1.4.1 Proximate and Ultimate Analyses 40

1.4.2 Types of Approach 41

2 Programming and Integrating Behavior 45

2.1 Introduction 45

2.2 Nerve-Based Coordination 46

2.2.1 The Insect Nervous System 47

2.2.2 Simple Reflexes and Repeated Motor Patterns 50

2.2.3 Ethological Explanations 56

2.3 Life in a Stimulus-Rich World 59

2.3.1 Sensory Tuning and Filtering 60

2.3.2 Memory and Learning 68

2.3.2 Memory and Learning 68

2.3.3 Insect Intelligence 81

2.4 Hormone-Based Coordination 83

2.4.1 Clocks and Reiterative Rhythms 86

2.4.2 Gated Rhythms 88

3 Spatial Adjustment 93

3.1 Introduction 93

3.2 Locomotion 94

3.2.1 Terrestrial and Aquatic Locomotion 96

3.2.2 Aerial Locomotion 98

3.3 Orientation 100

3.3.1 Locomotory Responses 101

3.3.2 Posture and Position 103

3.3.3 Orientation to Radiant Energy 105

3.3.4 Magnetic Field Orientation 108

3.3.5 Orientation to the Evidence of Others'Presence 109

3.4 Thermoregulation 510

3.4.1 Dormancy and Thermotolerance 110

3.4.2 Regulation of Heat Gain 113

3.4.3 Heat Production 114

3.5 Migration116

3.5.1 Seasonal Migration 117

3.5.2 Migration Under Ephemeral Conditions 122

3.5.3 Dispersal and Navigation 124

4 Foraging and Feeding 131

4.1 Introduction 131

4.1.1 Food Recognition and Acceptance 134

4.1.2 Regulation of Feeding 137

4.2 Foraging Strategies 140

4.2.1 Herbivory 141

4.2.2 Active Search 141

4.2.3 Trapping and Ambush 146

4.2.4 Parasites and Parasitoids 148

4.2.5 Theft and Kleptoparasitism 152

4.2.6 Insect Agriculture 154

4.2.7 Nest Symbionts: Becoming a House Pet 157

4.3 Coevolution and the Arms Race 164

4.3.1 Attack, Defense, and Counterattack 165

4.3.2 Employing Mercenaries for Protection 170

4.3.3 The Tommy Tucker Syndrome: Food in Return for Services 173

4.4 Feeding as a Communal Activity 177

4.4.1 Simple Groups and Feeding Aggregations 177

4.4.2 Social Feeding Behaviors 181

5 Defense: A Survival Catalogue 185

5.1 Introduction 185

5.2 Defense Messages 186

5.3 Passive Messages 187

5.3.1 Crypsis: 'I'm Not Here!' 187

5.3.2 Systemic Defenses:'I'm Noxious!' 194

5.3.3 Mimicry: 'I'm Someone Else!' 197

5.3.4 Aposematic Defenses:'I'm Dangerous!' 202

5.4 Active Messages 204

5.4.1 Attack: 'I'm Turning the Tables!' 204

5.4.2 Startle: 'I'm Not What You Thought!' 209

5.4.3 Group Actions: 'We're in This Together!' 213

6 Chemical Communication 217

6.1 Introduction 217

6.2 Mechanisms of Chemical Communication 217

6.2.1 Odor Creation and Reception 218

6.2.2 Communication Through Chemistry 223

6.3 The Functions of Chemical Communication 227

6.3.1 Finding and Choosing Mates 228

6.3.2 Assembly, Aggregation, and Recruitment 231

6.3.3 Alarm and Alert 240

6.3.4 Host-Marking 242

6.3.5 Recognition 246

6.4 The Information Content of Pheromones 249

6.4.1 Physiological Adjustments: The Q/K Ratio 249

6.4.2 Pheromones as Language: Syntax and Lexicon 251

6.4.3 Exploitation and Code-Breaking 255

6.4.4 The Chemical Channel and Other Signal Modes 256

6.5 Chemical Communication and Insect Control 258

7 Visual Communication 261

7.1 Introduction 261

7.2 Bioluminescence 262

7.2.1 The Physiology of Insect Light Production 263

7.2.2 Bioluminescence as a Communication Method 264

7.3 Light Reception 268

7.3.1 Receptors and Form Perception 268

7.3.2 Visual Acuity and Flicker Vision 272

7.3.3 Polarized Light Perception 275

7.3.4 Color Vision 277

7.4 Functions of Visual Communication 279

7.4.1 Aggregation and Dispersion 281

7.4.2 Alarm 283

7.4.3 Sexual Signals 284

7.4.4 Multimodal Signaling 288

8 Mechanocommunication 291

8.1 Introduction 291

8.2 Producing and Sending Signals 292

8.2.1 Sound Creation 293

8.2.2 Distance and Substrate 295

8.3 Receiving Signals 296

8.3.1 Vibration 298

8.3.2 Hearing 303

8.3.3 Communication by Touch 305

8.4 The Acoustic Channel 307

8.4.1 Parameters of Insect Song 307

8.4.2 Song Synchronies 308

8.4.3 Active Acoustics 311

8.4.4 Sound as a Communication Method 313

8.5 Functions of Insect Communicative Sounds 314

8.5.1 Protest, Alarm, and Aggression 314

8.5.2 Aposematic Sounds and Acoustic Mimicry 319

8.5.3 Sexual Signals 321

8.5.4 Social Sounds 327

9 Reproductive Behavior 341

9.1 Introduction 341

9.2 Courtship and Mating 342

9.2.1 The Physiology of Mating Behavior 344

9.2.2 Reproduction Modes 346

9.2.3 Complexity and Plasticity 349

9.2.4 Pollination and Male Reproductive Behavior 354

9.3 Courtship and Conflict 359

9.3.1 Dimorphism, Sexual Selection, and Mate Choice 361

9.3.2 Intrasexual Competition 369

9.3.3 Territoriality and Dominance 371

9.3.4 Nuptial Gifts 372

9.4 Mating Systems and Parental Investment 380

9.5 Oviposition Behavior 382

9.5.1 Selecting a Site or Host 383

9.5.2 Reproductive Rates and Energy Allocation 387

10 Parental Behaviors and Social Life 389

10.1 Introduction 389

10.2 Social Organization 390

10.2.1 Aggregations and Simple Groups 390

10.2.2 Parent-Offspring Interactions 394

10.2.3 Solitary and Communal Nesters 400

10.3 The Insect Social Register 407

10.3.1 The Ants 410

10.3.2 The Eusocial Wasps 416

10.3.3 The Bees 420

10.3.4 The Termites 423

10.3.5 Lesser Known Candidates 427

10.4 Implications and Correlates of Social Life 428

10.4.1 The Ecology of Parental Care 430

10.4.2 Paradoxes of Insect Sociality 434

10.4.3 Interspecific Social

Interactions 440

Credites 445

Plates 463

Index 503

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