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Inside History of the Carnegie Steel Company: A Romance of Millions

Overview


“For years I have been convinced that there is not an honest bone in your body. Now I know that you are a god-damned thief,” Henry Clay Frick reportedly told Andrew Carnegie at their last meeting in 1900, just before J. P. Morgan bought the Carnegie Steel Company and founded United States Steel.

Three years later, James Bridge, who had served as Carnegie's personal secretary, published this book. In it he recounted the events that led up to the final confrontation between two of America's most powerful ...

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The inside history of the Carnegie steel company; a romance of millions

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Overview


“For years I have been convinced that there is not an honest bone in your body. Now I know that you are a god-damned thief,” Henry Clay Frick reportedly told Andrew Carnegie at their last meeting in 1900, just before J. P. Morgan bought the Carnegie Steel Company and founded United States Steel.

Three years later, James Bridge, who had served as Carnegie's personal secretary, published this book. In it he recounted the events that led up to the final confrontation between two of America's most powerful capitalists. The book created a sensation when it appeared in 1903. Not only did it describe the raw emotions of Carnegie and Frick, those most brilliant and uneasy of business partners, it also told of the history and inner workings of the industrial giant, Carnegie Steel.

Bridge was an open partisan of Frick, and the portrait of Carnegie that emerges from this book is not flattering. But he was an experienced journalist, and he uses sources carefully. His book remains a striking insider's narrative of the American steel industry in the last decades of the nineteenth century-as well as the most revealing account of the emotions of some of its major owners.

The introduction by John Ingram places the book in perspective for both the historian and general reader.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Reprint--on acid-free paper--of the Aldine Book Co. edition of 1903 with a new introduction (25 pp.) by John N. Ingram. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780822960959
  • Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press
  • Publication date: 6/19/1991
  • Series: Social and Labor History Ser.
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


James Howard Bridge was a journalist, and personal secretary to Andrew Carnegie.
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Table of Contents

Introduction
Preface
Author's note to the third edition
Ch. I The Humble Beginning: 1853-1863 1
Ch. II "A Most Hazardous Enterprise": 1863-1865 13
Ch. III Early Struggles and Successes: 1865 25
Ch. IV Iron Railway Bridges: 1865 39
Ch. V A Rivalry of Great Furnaces: 1872 54
Ch. VI Beginnings and Growth of the Steel Business: 1875 71
Ch. VII Some Inside Financial History: 1875-1888 94
Ch. VIII Quarrels and "Ejectures" 117
Ch. IX A Glance at Processes 136
Ch. X The Rise and Growth of Homestead: 1879 150
Ch. XI The Incoming of Henry Clay Frick: 1882 167
Ch. XII The Capture of the Duquesne Steel Works: 1889 174
Ch. XIII Labor Contests in Theory and Practice 184
Ch. XIV The Homestead Battle: 1892 203
Ch. XV Attempted Assassination of Mr. Frick 224
Ch. XVI The Aftermath of War 236
Ch. XVII A Reluctant Supremacy: 1892-1899 254
Ch. XVIII The Workings of the Corporate Mind: 1899 275
Ch. XIX The Zenith of Prosperity 293
Ch. XX Carnegie's Attempt to Depose Frick 316
Ch. XXI The Failure of the Iron-Clad 336
Ch. XXII The Atlantic City Compromise 346
Ch. XXIII The Billion-Dollar Finale 358
Appendix 365
Index 371
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