The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu

The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu

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by Sax Rohmer
     
 

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Meet the ultimate villain, a Chinese master criminal of untold wealth, intellect, and occult powers whose goal is nothing less than world conquest: he is Dr. Fu-Manchu, a master of disguise who commands the criminal societies, or tongs, of Asia. His foil is Denis Nayland Smith, a plodding Englishman with vague connections to Scotland Yard, and his chemist

Overview

Meet the ultimate villain, a Chinese master criminal of untold wealth, intellect, and occult powers whose goal is nothing less than world conquest: he is Dr. Fu-Manchu, a master of disguise who commands the criminal societies, or tongs, of Asia. His foil is Denis Nayland Smith, a plodding Englishman with vague connections to Scotland Yard, and his chemist friend, Dr. Petrie. Can Smith and Petrie rely on pluck and luck to thwart the evil doctor’s dastardly plans?
A masterpiece of suspense, this 1913 classic is the first in the bestselling series of more than a dozen Dr. Fu-Manchu mysteries, several of which inspired popular film adaptations. The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu introduces a cast of colorful characters in a gripping, atmospheric narrative.
This inexpensive edition of the first Fu-Manchu mystery will delight detective-story aficionados as well as readers who enjoy a flavorful adventure novel.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486298986
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
07/10/1997
Series:
Dover Mystery Classics Series
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.40(d)

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The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu


By Sax Rohmer

MysteriousPress.com

Copyright © 2014 MysteriousPress.com/Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4804-9386-5


CHAPTER 1

"A GENTLEMAN TO SEE you, Doctor."

From across the common a clock sounded the half-hour.

"Ten-thirty!" I said. "A late visitor. Show him up, if you please."

I pushed my writing aside and tilted the lamp-shade, as footsteps sounded on the landing. The next moment I had jumped to my feet, for a tall, lean man, with his square-cut, cleans-haven face sun-baked to the hue of coffee, entered and extended both hands, with a cry:

"Good old Petrie! Didn't expect me, I'll swear!"

It was Nayland Smith—whom I had thought to be in Burma!

"Smith," I said, and gripped his hands hard, "this is a delightful surprise! Whatever—however—"

"Excuse me, Petrie!" he broke in. "Don't put it down to the sun!" And he put out the lamp, plunging the room into darkness.

I was too surprised to speak.

"No doubt you will think me mad," he continued, and, dimly, I could see him at the window, peering out into the road, "but before you are many hours older you will know that I have good reason to be cautious. Ah, nothing suspicious! Perhaps I am first this time." And, stepping back to the writing-table he relighted the lamp.

"Mysterious enough for you?" he laughed, and glanced at my unfinished MS. "A story, eh? From which I gather that the district is beastly healthy—what, Petrie? Well, I can put some material in your way that, if sheer uncanny mystery is a marketable commodity, ought to make you independent of influenza and broken legs and shattered nerves and all the rest."

I surveyed him doubtfully, but there was nothing in his appearance to justify me in supposing him to suffer from delusions. His eyes were too bright, certainly, and a hardness now had crept over his face. I got out the whisky and siphon, saying:

"You have taken your leave early?"

"I am not on leave," he replied, and slowly filled his pipe. "I am on duty."

"On duty!" I exclaimed. "What, are you moved to London or something?"

"I have got a roving commission, Petrie, and it doesn't rest with me where I am to-day nor where I shall be to-morrow."

There was something ominous in the words, and, putting down my glass, its contents untasted, I faced round and looked him squarely in the eyes. "Out with it!" I said. "What is it all about?"

Smith suddenly stood up and stripped off his coat. Rolling back his left shirt-sleeve he revealed a wicked-looking wound in the fleshy part of the forearm. It was quite healed, but curiously striated for an inch or so around.

"Ever seen one like it?" he asked.

"Not exactly," I confessed. "It appears to have been deeply cauterized."

"Right! Very deeply!" he rapped. "A barb steeped in the venom of a hamadryad went in there!"

A shudder I could not repress ran coldly through me at mention of that most deadly of all the reptiles of the East.

"There's only one treatment," he continued, rolling his sleeve down again, "and that's with a sharp knife, a match, and a broken cartridge. I lay on my back, raving, for three days afterwards, in a forest that stank with malaria, but I should have been lying there now if I had hesitated. Here's the point. It was not an accident!"

"What do you mean?"

"I mean that it was a deliberate attempt on my life, and I am hard upon the tracks of the man who extracted that venom—patiently, drop by drop—from the poison-glands of the snake, who prepared that arrow, and who caused it to be shot at me."

"What fiend is this?"

"A fiend who, unless my calculations are at fault is now in London, and who regularly wars with pleasant weapons of that kind. Petrie, I have traveled from Burma not in the interests of the British Government merely, but in the interests of the entire white race, and I honestly believe—though I pray I may be wrong—that its survival depends largely upon the success of my mission."

To say that I was perplexed conveys no idea of the mental chaos created by these extraordinary statements, for into my humdrum suburban life Nayland Smith had brought fantasy of the wildest. I did not know what to think, what to believe.

"I am wasting precious time!" he rapped decisively, and, draining his glass, he stood up. "I came straight to you, because you are the only man I dare to trust. Except the big chief at headquarters, you are the only person in England, I hope, who knows that Nayland Smith has quitted Burma. I must have someone with me, Petrie, all the time—it's imperative! Can you put me up here, and spare a few days to the strangest business, I promise you, that ever was recorded in fact or fiction?"

I agreed readily enough, for, unfortunately, my professional duties were not onerous.

"Good man!" he cried, wringing my hand in his impetuous way. "We start now."

"What, to-night?"

"To-night! I had thought of turning in, I must admit. I have not dared to sleep for forty-eight hours, except in fifteen-minute stretches. But there is one move that must be made tonight and immediately. I must warn Sir Crichton Davey."

"Sir Crichton Davey—of the India—"

"Petrie, he is a doomed man! Unless he follows my instructions without question, without hesitation—before Heaven, nothing can save him! I do not know when the blow will fall, how it will fall, nor from whence, but I know that my first duty is to warn him. Let us walk down to the corner of the common and get a taxi."

How strangely does the adventurous intrude upon the humdrum; for, when it intrudes at all, more often than not its intrusion is sudden and unlooked for. To-day, we may seek for romance and fail to find it: unsought, it lies in wait for us at most prosaic corners of life's highway.

The drive that night, though it divided the drably commonplace from the wildly bizarre—though it was the bridge between the ordinary and the outré—has left no impression upon my mind. Into the heart of a weird mystery the cab bore me; and in reviewing my memories of those days I wonder that the busy thoroughfares through which we passed did not display before my eyes signs and portents—warnings.

It was not so. I recall nothing of the route and little of import that passed between us (we both were strangely silent, I think) until we were come to our journey's end. Then:

"What's this?" muttered my friend hoarsely.

Constables were moving on a little crowd of curious idlers who pressed about the steps of Sir Crichton Davey's house and sought to peer in at the open door. Without waiting for the cab to draw up to the curb, Nayland Smith recklessly leaped out and I followed close at his heels.

"What has happened?" he demanded breathlessly of a constable.

The latter glanced at him doubtfully, but something in his voice and bearing commanded respect.

"Sir Crichton Davey has been killed, sir."

Smith lurched back as though he had received a physical blow, and clutched my shoulder convulsively. Beneath the heavy tan his face had blanched, and his eyes were set in a stare of horror.

"My God!" he whispered. "I am too late!"

With clenched fists he turned and, pressing through the group of loungers, bounded up the steps. In the hall a man who unmistakably was a Scotland Yard official stood talking to a footman. Other members of the household were moving about, more or less aimlessly, and the chilly hand of King Fear had touched one and all, for, as they came and went, they glanced ever over their shoulders, as if each shadow cloaked a menace, and listened, as it seemed, for some sound which they dreaded to hear. Smith strode up to the detective and showed him a card, upon glancing at which the Scotland Yard man said something in a low voice, and, nodding, touched his hat to Smith in a respectful manner.

A few brief questions and answers, and, in gloomy silence, we followed the detective up the heavily carpeted stair, along a corridor lined with pictures and busts, and into a large library. A group of people were in this room, and one, in whom I recognized Chalmers Cleeve, of Harley Street, was bending over a motionless form stretched upon a couch.

Another door communicated with a small study, and through the opening I could see a man on all fours examining the carpet. The uncomfortable sense of hush, the group about the physician, the bizarre figure crawling, beetle-like, across the inner room, and the grim hub, around which all this ominous activity turned, made up a scene that etched itself indelibly on my mind.

As we entered Dr. Cleeve straightened himself, frowning thoughtfully.

"Frankly, I do not care to venture any opinion at present regarding the immediate cause of death," he said. "Sir Crichton was addicted to cocaine, but there are indications which are not in accordance with cocaine-poisoning. I fear that only a post-mortem can establish the facts—if," he added, "we ever arrive at them. A most mysterious case!"

Smith stepping forward and engaging the famous pathologist in conversation, I seized the opportunity to examine Sir Crichton's body.

The dead man was in evening dress, but wore an old smoking-jacket. He had been of spare but hardy build, with thin, aquiline features, which now were oddly puffy, as were his clenched hands. I pushed back his sleeve, and saw the marks of the hypodermic syringe upon his left arm. Quite mechanically I turned my attention to the right arm. It was unscarred, but on the back of the hand was a faint red mark, not unlike the imprint of painted lips. I examined it closely, and even tried to rub it off, but it evidently was caused by some morbid process of local inflammation, if it were not a birthmark.

Turning to a pale young man whom I had understood to be Sir Crichton's private secretary, I drew his attention to this mark, and inquired if it were constitutional. "It is not, sir," answered Dr. Cleeve, overhearing my question. "I have already made that inquiry.

Does it suggest anything to your mind? I must confess that it affords me no assistance."

"Nothing," I replied. "It is most curious."

"Excuse me, Mr. Burboyne," said Smith, now turning to the secretary, "but Inspector

Weymouth will tell you that I act with authority. I understand that Sir Crichton was—seized with illness in his study?"

"Yes—at half-past ten. I was working here in the library, and he inside, as was our custom."

"The communicating door was kept closed?"

"Yes, always. It was open for a minute or less about ten-twenty-five, when a message came for Sir Crichton. I took it in to him, and he then seemed in his usual health."

"What was the message?"

"I could not say. It was brought by a district messenger, and he placed it beside him on the table. It is there now, no doubt."

"And at half-past ten?"

"Sir Crichton suddenly burst open the door and threw himself, with a scream, into the library. I ran to him but he waved me back. His eyes were glaring horribly. I had just reached his side when he fell, writhing, upon the floor. He seemed past speech, but as I raised him and laid him upon the couch, he gasped something that sounded like 'The red hand!' Before I could get to bell or telephone he was dead!"

Mr. Burboyne's voice shook as he spoke the words, and Smith seemed to find this evidence confusing.

"You do not think he referred to the mark on his own hand?"

"I think not. From the direction of his last glance, I feel sure he referred to something in the study."

"What did you do?"

"Having summoned the servants, I ran into the study. But there was absolutely nothing unusual to be seen. The windows were closed and fastened. He worked with closed windows in the hottest weather. There is no other door, for the study occupies the end of a narrow wing, so that no one could possibly have gained access to it, whilst I was in the library, unseen by me. Had someone concealed himself in the study earlier in the evening—and I am convinced that it offers no hiding-place—he could only have come out again by passing through here."

Nayland Smith tugged at the lobe of his left ear, as was his habit when meditating.

"You had been at work here in this way for some time?"

"Yes. Sir Crichton was preparing an important book."

"Had anything unusual occurred prior to this evening?"

"Yes," said Mr. Burboyne, with evident perplexity; "though I attached no importance to it at the time. Three nights ago Sir Crichton came out to me, and appeared very nervous; but at times his nerves—you know? Well, on this occasion he asked me to search the study. He had an idea that something was concealed there."

"Some THING or someone?"

"'Something' was the word he used. I searched, but fruitlessly, and he seemed quite satisfied, and returned to his work."

"Thank you, Mr. Burboyne. My friend and I would like a few minutes' private investigation in the study."

CHAPTER 2

SIR CRICHTON DAVEY'S STUDY was a small one, and a glance sufficed to show that, as the secretary had said, it offered no hiding-place. It was heavily carpeted, and over-full of Burmese and Chinese ornaments and curios, and upon the mantelpiece stood several framed photographs which showed this to be the sanctum of a wealthy bachelor who was no misogynist. A map of the Indian Empire occupied the larger part of one wall. The grate was empty, for the weather was extremely warm, and a green-shaded lamp on the littered writing-table afforded the only light. The air was stale, for both windows were closed and fastened.

Smith immediately pounced upon a large, square envelope that lay beside the blottingpad. Sir Crichton had not even troubled to open it, but my friend did so. It contained a blank sheet of paper!

"Smell!" he directed, handing the letter to me. I raised it to my nostrils. It was scented with some pungent perfume.

"What is it?" I asked.

"It is a rather rare essential oil," was the reply, "which I have met with before, though never in Europe. I begin to understand, Petrie."

He tilted the lamp-shade and made a close examination of the scraps of paper, matches, and other debris that lay in the grate and on the hearth. I took up a copper vase from the mantelpiece, and was examining it curiously, when he turned, a strange expression upon his face.

"Put that back, old man," he said quietly.

Much surprised, I did as he directed.

"Don't touch anything in the room. It may be dangerous."

Something in the tone of his voice chilled me, and I hastily replaced the vase, and stood by the door of the study, watching him search, methodically, every inch of the room—behind the books, in all the ornaments, in table drawers, in cupboards, on shelves.

"That will do," he said at last. "There is nothing here and I have no time to search farther."

We returned to the library.

"Inspector Weymouth," said my friend, "I have a particular reason for asking that Sir Crichton's body be removed from this room at once and the library locked. Let no one be admitted on any pretense whatever until you hear from me." It spoke volumes for the mysterious credentials borne by my friend that the man from Scotland Yard accepted his orders without demur, and, after a brief chat with Mr. Burboyne, Smith passed briskly downstairs. In the hall a man who looked like a groom out of livery was waiting.

"Are you Wills?" asked Smith.

"Yes, sir."

"It was you who heard a cry of some kind at the rear of the house about the time of Sir Crichton's death?"

"Yes, sir. I was locking the garage door, and, happening to look up at the window of Sir Crichton's study, I saw him jump out of his chair. Where he used to sit at his writing, sir, you could see his shadow on the blind. Next minute I heard a call out in the lane."

"What kind of call?"

The man, whom the uncanny happening clearly had frightened, seemed puzzled for a suitable description.

"A sort of wail, sir," he said at last. "I never heard anything like it before, and don't want to again."

"Like this?" inquired Smith, and he uttered a low, wailing cry, impossible to describe. Wills perceptibly shuddered; and, indeed, it was an eerie sound.

"The same, sir, I think," he said, "but much louder."

"That will do," said Smith, and I thought I detected a note of triumph in his voice. "But stay! Take us through to the back of the house."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu by Sax Rohmer. Copyright © 2014 MysteriousPress.com/Open Road Integrated Media, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of MysteriousPress.com.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Sax Rohmer, was a prolific English novelist. He is best remembered for his most successful series of novels featuring the master criminal Dr Fu Manchu which are considered as all time best ever adventure novels.

The Fu Manchu stories, together with his more conventional detective series characters-Paul Harley, Gaston Max, Red Kerry, Morris Klaw -an occult detective, and The Crime Magnet -made Sax Rohmer as one of the most successful and well-paid authors of the 1920s and 1930s.

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The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sax Rohmer was a contemporary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. They both created super villains that have stayed with us. Moriarty was overshadowed by Sherlock Holmes but Dr. Fu-Manchu never took second place in the story. Rohmer's style is similar to many of the storytellers at the turn of the twentieth century, a wordy fast-paced narration by a secondary figure. In this case, a Dr. Petrie takes the role of Watson changing it to a strong ally to Nayland Smith, the lead investigator trying to stop Fu-Manchu. 'The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu' is written as a series of ten linked mysteries. Dr. Fu-Manchu is an evil genius who is working for the re-building of China into the only world power. Assassinations, kidnapping, drugs, biological weapons, poison gas, and hypnotism is just a short list of methods Fu-Manchu uses to attain his goals. Smith and Petrie fight to block Fu-Manchu who always seems to have one more move, one more plan, and one more escape. If you like any of the great popular storytellers of one hundred years ago, you will love the politically incorrect action/mystery story, 'The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu.' It has the mystery of a Sherlock Holmes story mixed with the exotic Orient. It is classic storytelling.
Anonymous 10 months ago
Really? Of course l am!
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
The Insid­i­ous Dr. Fu-Manchu by Sax Rohmer is a novel which first intro­duced the famous vil­lain. The novel was first pub­lished in 1913. Dr. John Petrie, a physi­cian and our nar­ra­tor, meets his friend Denis Nay­land Smith who served as British police com­mis­sioner in Asia. Smith seems to know all things Asia and the innate abil­ity to get all the sup­port he needs from British gov­ern­ment offi­cials. Petrie is, of course, knowl­edge­able in med­i­cine, foren­sics, chem­istry and an ace with a pis­tol – for good measure. The pair inves­ti­gates mur­ders, the opium trade, gets into death trap and more all with the com­mon denom­i­na­tor of the Shake­spearean look­ing but dev­il­ish Fu Manchu. The Insid­i­ous Dr. Fu-Manchu by Sax Rohmer is an easy, yet super­fi­cial read. The great­est claim to fame is intro­duc­ing this arch vil­lain which was the model for many oth­ers to come after him. This is not actu­ally a novel, but a col­lec­tion of short sto­ries and hence lacks depth and char­ac­ter devel­op­ment (which I can only assume is the fault of the for­mat). Each story con­tains a few short chap­ters about the “Yel­low Peril”. There is con­stant action, con­stant peril and, again due to the for­mat, con­stant nar­row escapes by Fu-Manchu at seem­ingly the last second. Dr. Fu-Manchu is has become to rep­re­sent embod­i­ment of evil, a mas­ter of alchemy (for poi­son gas), a bril­liant physi­cian, leader of assas­sins and vicious ani­mals, a spe­cial­ist of tor­ture and of arts of dark­ness. Add those qual­i­ties to a name which prac­ti­cally rolls off the tongue and you can under­stand why his name became syn­ony­mous with villains. The plot revolves around the Asi­atic threat and Fu-Manchu’s dia­bol­i­cal plan to restore China to its for­mer glory and replace the British Empire with a Chi­nese one. Of course the British see this as a threat to the white race as a whole. Why? Good question! Fu-Manchu is a con­tra­dic­tion, he prides him­self on being a patriot as well as the head of a crime syn­di­cate (much like Lucky Luciano who helped the US dur­ing WWII), he heals those he wounded as long as they don’t inter­fere with his nefar­i­ous plan to take over the world and prefers not to mur­der if he can help it. Yet he laughs with plea­sure at the sight of British police dying in one of his traps. The dia­log in the book is some­what stiff and the writ­ing is wooden at times. A word of warn­ing to the eas­ily incensed – this novel’s sen­ti­ments about race and moral­ity are… well… over 100 years old and we shall leave it at that. As I men­tion in other posts, it is unfair judge oth­ers by today’s stan­dards, Rhomer believed that the British Empire was a good thing (at the time almost half the world was under a British flag), and saw the emerg­ing China as a real, cred­i­ble and exis­ten­tial threat to the pros­per­ity he, his
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
bianca hernandez More than 1 year ago
a+greeaat+and+creepy+but+a+bit+weird+so+curious+aafter+every+chapter