Instruments and Experimentation in the History of Chemistry

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $34.98
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 46%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $34.98   
  • New (2) from $63.61   
  • Used (4) from $34.98   

Overview

From the days of the alchemists through the creation of the modern laboratory, chemistry has been defined by its instruments and experimental techniques. Historians, however, have tended to focus on the course of chemical theory rather than on the tools and experiments that drove the theory. This volume moves chemical instruments and experiments into the foreground of historical concern, in line with the emphasis on practice that characterizes current work on other fields of science and engineering. The principal themes are: change and stability, precision, the construction and transformation of apparatus, the dissemination of instruments, and the bridging of disciplines through instruments.The essays are divided into three chronological sections: The Practice of Alchemy (reviewing the material and iconographic evidence as well as the written record and the issue of reproducibility of alchemical experiments), From Hales to the Chemical Revolution (discussing significant seventeenth- and eighteenth-century innovations as well as smaller innovations that cumulatively extended the reach and improved the quality of chemical experimentation), and The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries (discussing the increasingly important role of innovative apparatus as chemistry grew into the first large-scale modern scientific discipline).Contributors : R. G. W. Anderson, Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent, Maurice Crosland, Jan Golinski, Frederic L. Holmes, Trevor H. Levere, Seymour H. Mauskopf,William R. Newman, Mary Jo Nye, Lawrence M. Principe, Alan J. Rocke, Colin A.

Russell, William A. Smeaton, Melvyn Usselman.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction: A Practical Science
Contributors
I The Practice of Alchemy 1
1 The Archaeology of Chemistry 5
2 Alchemy, Assaying, and Experiment 35
3 Apparatus and Reproducibility in Alchemy 55
II From Hales to the Chemical Revolution 75
4 "Slippery Substances": Some Practical and Conceptual Problems in the Understanding of Gases in the Pre-Lavoisier Era 79
5 Measuring Gases and Measuring Goodness 105
6 The Evolution of Lavoisier's Chemical Apparatus 137
7 "The Chemist's Balance for Fluids": Hydrometers and Their Multiple Identities, 1770-1810 153
8 "Fit Instruments": Thermometers in Eighteenth-Century Chemistry 185
9 Platinum and Ground Glass: Some Innovations in Chemical Apparatus by Guyton de Morveau and Others 211
III The Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries 239
10 Multiple Combining Proportions: The Experimental Evidence 243
11 Organic Analysis in Comparative Perspective: Liebig, Dumas, and Berzelius, 1811-1837 273
12 Chemical Techniques in a Preelectronic Age: The Remarkable Apparatus of Edward Frankland 311
13 Bridging Chemistry and Physics in the Experimental Study of Gunpowder 335
14 Laboratory Practice and the Physical Chemistry of Michael Polanyi 367
Index 401
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)