Integrated Solutions with DB2 by Rob Cutlip, John Medicke |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Integrated Solutions with DB2

Integrated Solutions with DB2

4.3 3
by Rob Cutlip, John Medicke
     
 
Now, two leading IBM solution architects show you how to use DB2 to create flexible infrastructures that simplify the construction of any enterprise-class business solution.

Learn how to seamlessly integrate DB2, Web servers, development tools, messaging infrastructure, and other crucial technologies. Then build, step by step, five specific solutions chosen to

Overview

Now, two leading IBM solution architects show you how to use DB2 to create flexible infrastructures that simplify the construction of any enterprise-class business solution.

Learn how to seamlessly integrate DB2, Web servers, development tools, messaging infrastructure, and other crucial technologies. Then build, step by step, five specific solutions chosen to address the core challenges facing today's enterprise. Along the way you'll learn how to use DB2 to improve productivity and customer service, reduce operating costs, strengthen key trading relationships, and more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780201754858
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
10/11/2003
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.26(h) x 0.77(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Integrated Solutions with DB2 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a clearly written, cleanly diagrammed explanation of current and imminent technologies. Yes, it is from IBM Press and yes, it¿s about DB2, but that doesn¿t mean it¿s old-fashioned. Great for programmers and even better for managers, this is the book to read before you read the ads in the glossy magazines. Cutlip and Medicke do a good job of demonstrating that IBM products are useful now in forward-looking projects, from pervasive computing with PDAs and the integration of tools that analyze functioning to placing some info at the edge of the Web. In discussing the IBM WebSphere Studio Application Developer, the authors write, ¿Our intent is not to provide a tutorial on the use of WSAD because the tools, wizards, and application details certainly vary from project to project.¿ P 140 What they do provide is conceptual details that will help drive decisions.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a curious DBA, I have often wanted a better understanding of how software integrates with DB2. I could find reams of technical documentation explaining the software, but no good high-level explanation. That is, until I discovered this book. It gives a great high-level explanation of the integration, but doesn't skimp on the technical details. If you need a quick education into Java, and .Net terms you will find it here. The book actually has a fairly deep discussion of many topics, including web application servers, that I found particulary helpful. The book covers IBM technology, as well as non-IBM products. Although the book is full of acronyms and new terminology, it is still quite readable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You can think of this as a set of case studies involving different uses of dB2. It is not about low level instances of how you query or modify your dB2 data, unlike several other books in this IBM Press/Addison-Wesley series. This book builds upon those, by assuming you are already well versed in dB2 itself. Each chapter is quite internally coherent, and most can be considered case studies. But between chapters, as you might expect, there is only a minor narrative thread. Only one chapter really delves into actual code description (on CRM email), and it is written in java. The other chapters give higher level examples of how you might plug different products together, some of which you might have to develop, rather than buy. The common theme, of course, is how they all sit atop a dB2 instance. In fact, the discussion is well written enough, and general enough, that you might be able to swap out dB2 and plug in a competitor's database. Sure, there are dB2 specific traits mentioned throughout. But if you have the ability and the commitment to develop a project above dB2, in a similar way to those described in the chapters, then you surely are able to make the necessary changes if you use another database. It is a tribute to the authors' skills that you can contemplate this. Though, given that they are at IBM, I doubt that they would regard this with equanimity.