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Integrated Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders
     

Integrated Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders

by John M. Oldham (Editor), Michelle B. Riba (Editor)
 

More than any other professional activity, integrated treatment -- the simultaneous use of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy to treat patients with mental disorders -- defines the field of psychiatry and distinguishes it from other mental health disciplines and medical specialties. This volume represents cutting-edge discussions -- including frequent use of

Overview

More than any other professional activity, integrated treatment -- the simultaneous use of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy to treat patients with mental disorders -- defines the field of psychiatry and distinguishes it from other mental health disciplines and medical specialties. This volume represents cutting-edge discussions -- including frequent use of clinical vignettes by skilled and senior clinicians -- of the clinical indications, challenges, and approaches of this most common type of psychiatric intervention.

Beginning with an overview of the scientific literature supporting integrated treatment, including a fascinating discussion on how patients attribute meanings to medications and how these meanings affect treatment compliance, subsequent chapters address these topics: • Theoretical support for integrative treatment -- despite a legacy of conflict about the combined use of psychodynamic psychotherapy and medication. Suggests that practitioners move away from dualistic thinking by focusing on the neurobiological aspects of psychotherapy and explores the concept of sequential treatment.

• Techniques for providing integrative treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder -- especially timely in light of the soon-to-be-adopted APA Guideline on the treatment of this disorder, which specifically advocates integrated treatment.

• Techniques for providing integrative treatment for patients with substance abuse disorder -- an area marked by intense controversy between physicians and nonmedical addiction therapists about the appropriate role of medications. Reviews three leading psychotherapies -- twelve-step facilitation, motivational enhancement therapy, and relapse prevention -- and discusses 11 important goals in the use of psychotherapy for opioid, nicotine, alcohol, and cocaine addictions.

• Methods for enhancing patient compliance and adherence -- since more than 50% of patients fail to follow medication instructions. Provides clear techniques for effective intervention through cognitive therapy.

• The benefits and challenges of split treatment -- in which the psychiatrist manages patient medication and another mental health professional conducts psychotherapy -- using clinical vignettes to demonstrate practical and effective interventions. This increasingly common arrangement is favored by managed care organizations, which perceive it as more cost effective, despite scientific evidence to the contrary.

Enhanced by charts, graphs, and illustrations, this up-to-date review will find a broad audience among psychiatric practitioners and residents, psychologists, social workers, nurse practitioners, substance abuse counselors, and case managers in community psychiatry. By offering the very latest in its field, this comprehensive volume will also prove especially valuable to students of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychopharmacology.

American Psychiatric Publishing

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Nicholas Greco IV, MS, BCETS, CATSM (Columbia College of Missouri)
Description: This book provides an excitingly new and refreshing perspective on the strong consideration for the integration of psychotherapy and psychopharmacotherapy within the field of psychiatry.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide mental health professionals with new knowledge and insight regarding integrated treatment. This treatment modality has long been overlooked and undervalued, and the authors who collaborated on this book shed new light upon what may possibly be the future of mental health treatment. The book discusses the various clinical indications, provides challenging scenarios, interesting approaches, and applicable interventions in implementing integrated treatment. This is an indispensable and unquestionably worthwhile contribution to the field of mental health thus meeting the author's objectives.
Audience: Intended mainly for psychiatrists, this book will augment the seasoned clinician's treatment planning and approaches, serve as an invaluable guide for the young practitioner, and may be beneficial for the practicing clinical psychologist. The authors who collaborated on this book are notable clinicians and researchers who are well-versed in the field of mental health, abreast of the current directions in which the field is heading, and focused on providing both quality and comprehensive care to patients.
Features: This book appropriately begins with an introduction to integrated treatment that includes an overview of the applicability across psychiatric disorders supported by case vignettes and followed by recommendations for the clinician. Notable chapters include integrated treatment for borderline personality disorder, psychodynamic therapy and medication, and an insightful chapter by Judith Bock on cognitive therapy. The tables are appropriately organized, and the case vignettes supplement each chapter by providing clinicians with familiar patient presentations.
Assessment: The barrage of information in psychiatry has become overwhelming, and the distinction of who is and who is not an authority in the field can sometimes be overshadowed by the need for information. This book emerges from the shadows as it brings together notable authors with insightful and pertinent approaches to the comprehensive care of psychiatric patients.
4 Stars! from Doody

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585620272
Publisher:
American Psychiatric Publishing, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/28/2001
Series:
Review of Psychiatry Series
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

John C. Markowitz

Dr. Kay and his colleagues correctly define integrated treatment, the combined intervention with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy by a psychiatrist, as a central and defining clinical characteristic of the profession. A team of experts reviews indications for, potential advantages of, and limitations of what we know about combined, sequenced, and integrated treatment for key psychiatric disorders. The authors provide clear case examples and clinical wisdom. Integrated treatment should be a rallying point for reimbursement of psychiatric practitioners. This book provides its agenda.

Robert Michels

The majority of patients treated by American psychiatrists receive a combination of medication and psychotherapy. However, for most, this combination therapy is not really an integrated therapy. It is only a few years since our theories suggested that such combinations were ill advised or incompatible, and even today most of our research is on the efficacy of monotherapies rather than of integrated therapies. Dr. Kay and his colleagues discuss the background of this problem, review the available research, and present guidelines for clinical practice. In doing so they provide the foundation for a new world of evidence based integrated treatments.

Meet the Author

Jerald Kay, M.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Wright State University School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio.

American Psychiatric Publishing

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