Integrating Linux and Windows

Overview

The complete solutions guide for every Linux/Windows system administrator!

  • Your complete Linux/Windows integration guide
  • Detailed coverage of dual-boot issues, data compatibility, and networking
  • Implementing Samba file/print services ...
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Overview

The complete solutions guide for every Linux/Windows system administrator!

  • Your complete Linux/Windows integration guide
  • Detailed coverage of dual-boot issues, data compatibility, and networking
  • Implementing Samba file/print services for Windows workstations
  • Providing cross-platform database access

Running Linux and Windows in the same environment? Here's the comprehensive, up-to-the-minute solutions guide you've been searching for!

In Integrating Linux and Windows, top consultant Mike McCune brings together hundreds of solutions for the problems that Linux/Windows system administrators encounter most often. McCune focuses on the critical interoperability issues real businesses face: networking, program/data compatibility, dual-boot systems, and more. You'll discover exactly how to:

  • Use Samba and Linux to deliver high-performance, low-cost file and print services to Windows workstations
  • Compare and implement the best Linux/Windows connectivity techniques: NFS, FTP, remote commands, secure shell, telnet, and more
  • Provide reliable data exchange between Microsoft Office and StarOffice for Linux
  • Provide high-performance cross-platform database access via ODBC
  • Make the most of platform-independent, browser-based applications
  • Manage Linux and Windows on the same workstation: boot managers, partitioning, compressed drives, file systems, and more

For anyone running both Linux and Windows, McCune delivers honest and objective explanations of all your integration options, plus realistic, proven solutions you won't find anywhereelse. This book will help you keep your users happy, your costs under control, and your sanity intact!

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This clearly organized, amiably written guide provides solutions for the interoperability issues that come up when Linux and Windows are used together, including: using Samba and Linux for file and print services, implementing the best connectivity techniques, providing reliable data exchange, providing high performance cross-platform database access via ODBC, making the most of platform-independent, browser-based applications, and managing the two systems at the same workstation with boot managers, partitioning, compressed drives, and file systems. McCune is a consultant in Chicago. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Introduction

In early 1998, I was looking at re-installing Windows 95 for the third time. Granted, I stress computers more than the average user, but this was getting old. I had been playing around with Linux since early 1995 and it looked like a good time to use it as my primary desktop.

I already knew how to install and configure Linux, but I had never used it as a desktop. I found plenty of books on Linux configuration, a few on using it as a server, but nothing on using it as a desktop. Instead I had to scour the Internet for useful information. What I have tried to do for this book is compile what I have learned over the past two years. Hopefully, this will save you the time and frustration of finding it yourselves.

So, how does Linux compare to Windows? As with anything else, each one has its own strengths and weaknesses.

Windows is king of the desktop for good reason. It has a polished interface and more end-user applications than any other operating system. It is also pre-installed on most new PCs, making it an easy, safe choice for most PCs. These factors combine to give Windows about 90% of the desktop market.

Linux is based on UNIX and inherits its security and stability from it. Linux is the most popular choice for public Web servers and it also holds about 25% of the small server market. It is also free (or nearly so) and comes packed with lots of useful tools for programming and server management.

These distinctions aren't permanent, however. Several groups are working on polishing Linux's interface. There is also a rush to develop more end-user applications for Linux. Large PC makers such as Dell, Compaq, andIBM are starting to offer Linux pre-installed on PCs.

While the market for Linux is comparatively small, Linux grew from less than 1% of the desktop market in 1998 to about 4% in 1999. This is amazing considering the Apple Macintosh, which has been around for 15 years, is holding at 5% of the desktop market.

Windows is also working to gain a foothold in the traditional strengths of the UNIX (and Linux) market: security, stability, and scalability. Microsoft put billions of dollars into the recently released Windows 2000 to address these issues. While the jury is still out on whether it succeeded, early reports say that Windows 2000 is much improved over earlier versions of Windows in these areas.

There are also many other reasons for choosing an operating system. They can often draw fanatical devotion (just ask a dedicated MacIntosh user). Despite (or maybe because of) its success, Microsoft has some very dedicated enemies. Just search the Internet for "Satan" or "Antichrist" and you will be surprised how many anti-Microsoft sites you hit. The Microsoft Antitrust case was also pushed forward by some dedicated foes. Some users try Linux as an alternative to Windows. It may not be the best way to choose an operating system, but never discount the power of fanatical devotion.

Such devotion is not necessary. Linux and Windows can peacefully coexist on the same computer. It is even possible to run Linux and Windows at the same time! The whole first section of this book is devoted to making coexistence as easy as possible.

The middle section is dedicated to finding useful applications for your Linux systems. Sometimes the same application is available for both Linux and Windows; in other cases, equivalent applications are available; and in a few cases, the applications are only available for Windows. The good news is that most people can do everything they need to do with either Linux or Windows.

The last section deals with networking. This is a rather advanced topic, but networking is moving from the Fortune 500 into homes and small businesses at a rapid rate. Networking is getting inexpensive enough to offer the same advantages that large businesses have long enjoyed: sharing files, printers, and Internet connections. The increasing use of high-speed Internet connections in the home will continue to drive up demand for home networking.

Fortunately, both Linux and Windows have programs that allow easy connection to each other. Samba allows Linux to act as a Windows file server. Additionally, the NFS and LPD programs allow Windows to use Linux's native protocols.

So which is better, Linux or Windows? That is like asking whether a car or truck is better. They are built for different purposes. Windows plays the traditional role of the car; it is more polished and aimed at the mass market. Linux plays the traditional role of a truck; it is durable and intended to be used as a work vehicle. But like cars and trucks, the roles are starting to overlap. Linux is becoming more polished and easier to use and Windows is concentrating more on security and stability. Windows is still the choice for most users' desktops, but it is no longer the only choice. As you will see in this book, Linux is a solid choice for a server and a viable alternative in the desktop market.

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Table of Contents

Introduction xiii
Chapter 1 Having Linux and Windows on the Same PC 1
1.1 Partitions 1
1.2 File systems 1
1.3 Partition Naming 3
1.4 Linux and Windows 95/98 5
1.4.1 Booting Linux 5
1.4.2 Troubleshooting LILO 6
1.4.3 Booting Windows 9x 6
1.4.4 UMSDOS 7
1.4.5 Booting with UMSDOS 8
1.4.6 Managing UMSDOS Filesystems 8
1.4.7 Working with DOS and UMSDOS 9
1.5 Setting up Linux and Windows 3x/9x on Separate Partitions 9
1.5.1 Using LILO to Dual Boot 9
1.5.2 Using loadlin to Bootup 10
1.6 Partitioning an Existing Hard Drive 10
1.6.1 fdisk 12
1.6.2 Resizing Existing Partitions 12
1.6.3 FIPS 12
1.6.4 Restrictions of FIPS 12
1.6.5 Using FIPS 13
1.6.6 Special Situations with FIPS 15
1.6.7 NTFS Partitions 15
1.6.8 Using NT's Boot Loader 16
1.6.9 Using LILO 18
Chapter 2 Accessing Ext2 Partitions with Windows 19
2.1 Accessing ext2 Partitions with DOS and Windows 3.1 19
2.2 Itools 19
2.2.1 Graphical Interfaces for Itools 21
2.3 Accessing ext2 Partitions with Windows 9x 21
2.4 Accessing ext2 Partitions with Windows NT and 2000 23
Chapter 3 Mounting Windows Partitions with Linux 25
3.1 Accessing Compressed DOS/Windows Drives with Linux 26
3.1.1 Some Problems with DMSDOS 27
3.2 Adding a Partition to the fstab 27
Chapter 4 Emulators 29
4.1 DOS 29
4.2 Windows 30
4.3 VMware 31
4.3.1 How Well Does it Work? 33
4.3.2 Known Problems with VMware 34
4.3.3 Tuning VMware 34
4.4 FreeMWare 37
4.5 Win4Lin 38
4.6 Conclusion 38
Chapter 5 Internet Applications 39
5.1 Web Server Compatibility 39
5.1.1 PHP 40
5.1.2 Active Server Pages 40
5.2 FrontPage Extensions 41
5.3 Using Microsoft Office Files on the Web 41
5.4 Web Browsers 42
5.4.1 Browsers Available for Both Linux and Windows 42
5.4.2 Windows Browsers 42
5.4.3 Up-and-Coming Browsers 43
5.4.4 Browser Plugins 43
5.5 Email 44
5.5.1 Mail Clients 44
5.5.2 Mail Servers 45
5.6 Streaming Media 46
5.6.1 Streaming Video 47
5.6.2 Streaming Audio 48
5.7 Chat 50
5.8 Instant Messaging 51
5.9 Internet Security 52
Chapter 6 Business Applications 57
6.1 Microsoft Office 57
6.2 Corel WordPerfect Office 57
6.2.1 WordPerfect 8 for Linux 59
6.3 Other Commercial Productivity Suites 59
6.3.1 Star Office 60
6.3.2 Applixware 60
6.4 Open Source Office Suites 60
6.4.1 Koffice 61
6.4.2 Gnome Office 61
6.5 Web-Based Suites 61
6.6 Reading and Writing Microsoft Office Files 63
6.7 Exporting MS Office Files 64
6.8 Importing and Exporting MS Office Files with Linux 66
6.9 Using MS Office Documents with Star Office 66
6.10 Checkpoints When Importing and Exporting 69
6.11 Financial Programs 70
6.12 Graphics Programs 72
6.12.1 Graphics Conversion 74
6.13 The Last Word 75
6.14 Conclusions 75
Chapter 7 Databases 77
7.1 Using Databases 78
7.2 Choosing a Database 78
7.3 Connecting Databases 79
7.4 ODBC 79
Chapter 8 Fun and Games 81
8.1 Games 81
8.1.1 Loki 81
8.1.2 id Software 83
8.1.3 Unreal Tournament 83
8.2 Game Servers and Extras 84
8.3 Classic Games 85
Chapter 9 The Linux Desktop 87
9.1 Switching Desktops 88
9.2 Configuring Desktops 89
9.3 Themes 90
9.4 Conclusion 93
Chapter 10 Running Applications Through A Network 95
10.1 X-Windows 95
10.1.1 X-Windows on Linux 95
10.1.2 X-Windows on Microsoft Windows 96
10.2 Citrix WinFrame 97
10.2.1 Overview of the Server 97
10.2.2 Client Configuration 97
10.2.3 Application Configuration 98
10.2.4 Cost 99
10.3 VNC 99
10.3.1 Installing VNC Server for Linux 100
10.3.2 Using the VNC Viewer for Linux 102
10.3.3 Installing VNC Server for Windows 105
10.3.4 Installing VNC Viewer for Windows 107
10.3.5 Java VNC Viewer 112
10.3.6 Optimizing VNC 112
10.3.7 VNC Security 113
10.4 Conclusion 114
Chapter 11 Introduction to Windows and Linux Networking 115
11.1 Net BIOS 115
11.2 TCP/IP and Active Directory 116
11.3 Net BIOS over ICP/IP 117
Chapter 12 Introduction to Samba 119
12.1 How Samba Started 119
12.2 How Samba Works 120
Chapter 13 Setting Up Samba as a Windows NT Server 123
13.1 Setting up Samba as a Stand-Alone Windows NT File Server 123
13.1.1 Setting Up DHCP 124
13.2 Adding a Samba Server to an Existing Network 132
13.3 Samba as a Primary Domain Controller 133
Chapter 14 Connecting Linux to Windows PCS 135
14.1 smbclient Command-Line Options 136
14.2 smbclient Commands 139
14.3 smbtar 144
14.4 smbprint 144
14.5 smbfs 145
14.6 Sharity 146
14.7 Conclusion 146
Chapter 15 Printing with Samba 147
15.1 printtool 147
15.2 Testing the Printer 151
15.3 Setting up Samba for Printing 153
15.4 Automatic Print Driver Installation 154
Chapter 16 Using NFS and NIS in Linux and Windows 159
16.1 Setting up Linux as an NFS Server 159
16.2 Using an NFS Client on Linux 163
16.2.1 Optimizing NFS 163
16.2.2 Hard and Soft Mounts 164
16.3 Using NFS on Windows 164
16.3.1 Setting up an NFS server on Windows NT 164
16.3.2 Setting up an NFS Client 165
16.3.3 Connecting to an NFS Server with Windows 166
16.3.4 NFS Gateways 166
16.3.5 NFS Security 167
16.4 Setting up an NIS Server on Linux 167
16.5 Setting up an NIS Client on Linux 170
16.6 NIS Support for Windows 172
16.6.1 Problems with NISGina 174
16.6.2 NIS Security 174
Chapter 17 Implementing FTP, Telnet and Other Unix Protocols in Windows 175
17.1 Setting Up the FTP Server for Windows 176
17.2 Setting up FTP for Linux 177
17.3 Telnet and Remote Services for Linux 178
17.4 Secure Shell (SSH) 178
17.4.1 What is SSH? 178
17.4.2 What Does It Protect Against? 179
17.4.3 What SSH Doesn't Protect Against 179
17.4.4 SSH Client for Windows 179
17.4.5 Installing SSH1 for Linux 180
17.4.6 Setting Up an SSH1 Server for Linux 180
17.4.7 Using the SSH Clients 180
17.4.8 Running Other Services over SSH 181
17.4.9 Administering SSH 183
17.4.10 Troubleshooting SSH 183
17.4.11 X11 Problems 186
17.4.12 Finding Support for SSH 186
Appendix A Disk Error Codes 187
Appendix B Samba Documentation 189
Appendix C Samba Man Pages 229
Appendix D Samba TCP/IP Documentation 345
Index 385
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Preface

PREFACE:

Introduction

In early 1998, I was looking at re-installing Windows 95 for the third time. Granted, I stress computers more than the average user, but this was getting old. I had been playing around with Linux since early 1995 and it looked like a good time to use it as my primary desktop.

I already knew how to install and configure Linux, but I had never used it as a desktop. I found plenty of books on Linux configuration, a few on using it as a server, but nothing on using it as a desktop. Instead I had to scour the Internet for useful information. What I have tried to do for this book is compile what I have learned over the past two years. Hopefully, this will save you the time and frustration of finding it yourselves.

So, how does Linux compare to Windows? As with anything else, each one has its own strengths and weaknesses.

Windows is king of the desktop for good reason. It has a polished interface and more end-user applications than any other operating system. It is also pre-installed on most new PCs, making it an easy, safe choice for most PCs. These factors combine to give Windows about 90% of the desktop market.

Linux is based on UNIX and inherits its security and stability from it. Linux is the most popular choice for public Web servers and it also holds about 25% of the small server market. It is also free (or nearly so) and comes packed with lots of useful tools for programming and server management.

These distinctions aren't permanent, however. Several groups are working on polishing Linux's interface. There is also a rush to develop more end-user applications for Linux. Large PC makers such as Dell, Compaq,andIBM are starting to offer Linux pre-installed on PCs.

While the market for Linux is comparatively small, Linux grew from less than 1% of the desktop market in 1998 to about 4% in 1999. This is amazing considering the Apple Macintosh, which has been around for 15 years, is holding at 5% of the desktop market.

Windows is also working to gain a foothold in the traditional strengths of the UNIX (and Linux) market: security, stability, and scalability. Microsoft put billions of dollars into the recently released Windows 2000 to address these issues. While the jury is still out on whether it succeeded, early reports say that Windows 2000 is much improved over earlier versions of Windows in these areas.

There are also many other reasons for choosing an operating system. They can often draw fanatical devotion (just ask a dedicated MacIntosh user). Despite (or maybe because of) its success, Microsoft has some very dedicated enemies. Just search the Internet for "Satan" or "Antichrist" and you will be surprised how many anti-Microsoft sites you hit. The Microsoft Antitrust case was also pushed forward by some dedicated foes. Some users try Linux as an alternative to Windows. It may not be the best way to choose an operating system, but never discount the power of fanatical devotion.

Such devotion is not necessary. Linux and Windows can peacefully coexist on the same computer. It is even possible to run Linux and Windows at the same time! The whole first section of this book is devoted to making coexistence as easy as possible.

The middle section is dedicated to finding useful applications for your Linux systems. Sometimes the same application is available for both Linux and Windows; in other cases, equivalent applications are available; and in a few cases, the applications are only available for Windows. The good news is that most people can do everything they need to do with either Linux or Windows.

The last section deals with networking. This is a rather advanced topic, but networking is moving from the Fortune 500 into homes and small businesses at a rapid rate. Networking is getting inexpensive enough to offer the same advantages that large businesses have long enjoyed: sharing files, printers, and Internet connections. The increasing use of high-speed Internet connections in the home will continue to drive up demand for home networking.

Fortunately, both Linux and Windows have programs that allow easy connection to each other. Samba allows Linux to act as a Windows file server. Additionally, the NFS and LPD programs allow Windows to use Linux's native protocols.

So which is better, Linux or Windows? That is like asking whether a car or truck is better. They are built for different purposes. Windows plays the traditional role of the car; it is more polished and aimed at the mass market. Linux plays the traditional role of a truck; it is durable and intended to be used as a work vehicle. But like cars and trucks, the roles are starting to overlap. Linux is becoming more polished and easier to use and Windows is concentrating more on security and stability. Windows is still the choice for most users' desktops, but it is no longer the only choice. As you will see in this book, Linux is a solid choice for a server and a viable alternative in the desktop market.

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