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Intellectual Origins Of Jeffersonian Democracy

Overview

The Intellectual Origins of Jeffersonian Democracy, available for the first time in this Lexington Books edition, is Douglass Adair's first major work of historical inquiry. Adair was a mentor to many of the nation's leading scholars and has long been admired for his original and profound observations about the founding of the American republic. Written in 1943, The Intellectual Origins of Jeffersonian Democracy has been praised widely as the seminal analysis of the origins of American democracy. The passage of ...

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Overview

The Intellectual Origins of Jeffersonian Democracy, available for the first time in this Lexington Books edition, is Douglass Adair's first major work of historical inquiry. Adair was a mentor to many of the nation's leading scholars and has long been admired for his original and profound observations about the founding of the American republic. Written in 1943, The Intellectual Origins of Jeffersonian Democracy has been praised widely as the seminal analysis of the origins of American democracy. The passage of time has not dulled Adair's arguments; instead, his critique of economic determinism, his emphasis on the influence of ideology on the Founders, and his belief in the importance of civic virtue and morality to good republican government have become ever more critical to our conception of American history. With judicious prose and elegant insights, Adair explores the classical and modern European heritage of liberalism, and he raises fundamental questions about the nature of democratic government. This book is for any serious reader interested in American intellectual history, political thought, and the founding of the republic.

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Editorial Reviews

Joyce Appleby
Adair drew people to him because he quickened the imagination of all those around him. You left his presence with images and ideas buzzing, feeling yourself more alive just for sharing a few minutes with him. . . . When early Americanists decided that virtue was the principal concern of the founding generation, I realized that he had anticipated their interest, perhaps even fostered it.
Forrest McDonald
[Adair's] dissertation was a masterpiece, and it is no doubt the most cited unpublished doctoral dissertation of all time. He was years ahead of the rest of us.
From The Critics
Ably edited by Mark E. Yellin and enhanced with a foreword by Joyce Appleby, Douglass Adair's 1943 treatise The Intellectual Origins Of Jeffersonian Democracy: Republicanism, The Class Struggle, And The Virtuous Farmer offers contemporary readers a wealth of judicious prose and elegant insights into the classical and modern European heritage of American liberalism as reflecting in the establishment of an American democracy. Long out of print, this edition of The Intellectual Origins Of Jeffersonian Democracy is a very welcome addition to the reading lists for students of American intellectual and political history, as well as the principles inspiring and governing the founding of the American republic.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739101254
  • Publisher: The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group Inc
  • Publication date: 8/28/2000
  • Edition number: 224
  • Pages: 214
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.45 (d)

Meet the Author

Douglass G. Adair was Professor of History at the College of William and Mary and Claremont Graduate School. He was the editor of the William and Mary Quarterly in the 1940s and 1950s, during which time he led the journal to the prominence it enjoys today. Mark E. Yellin teaches at North Carolina State University. He has been a contributor to the Review of Politics and the American Political Science Review.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 A Polemical Prologue Chapter 3 The Constant and Universal Principles of Human Nature Chapter 4 According to Aristotle Chapter 5 The Desperate Debtor and the Hall of Mirrors Chapter 6 The High Toned Government Chapter 7 The Extended Republic Chapter 8 The Virtuous Farmer Chapter 9 Epilogue

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