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Intelligent Design
     

Intelligent Design

1.5 2
by Denise Little
 

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These ten original stories explore one of the most heatedly debated topics today. From a tale that examines whether life on Earth is an out-of-control science project, to one which reveals which species will inherit the planet, to a portrait of a scientist determined to discover the truth about God, the stories in this anthology tackle the big questions in ways that

Overview

These ten original stories explore one of the most heatedly debated topics today. From a tale that examines whether life on Earth is an out-of-control science project, to one which reveals which species will inherit the planet, to a portrait of a scientist determined to discover the truth about God, the stories in this anthology tackle the big questions in ways that range from startling to satirical, and are always entertaining.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Lisa Martincik
How would science fiction writers tackle the topic of intelligent design? Little gathers eleven short story answers to that question, more specifically evolution versus creationism. Kristine Kathryn Rusch's opening tale, The Year of the Rat, is certainly speculative but barely qualifies as science fiction; most of the remainder are a bit more robust. Several stories deal with non-human protagonists, like the primate university students of Int Des 101 by Jean Rabe. The book closes with Laura Resnick's Project: Creation, a humorous look at God as a fussy designer. Some have an agenda and some are surprising, but the vast majority of entries take a comedic tack, perhaps as a result of the controversial subject. Little gives her authors a big task in the subject of intelligent design, and the results definitely vary. As noted, a couple of the stories are difficult to justify as science fiction; one is outright fantasy. Others make a good attempt at dealing with the subject but produce a mediocre outcome; a few are genuinely fine in all regards. The stories with an outright humorous twist seem to work best, although arguably they take the weakest stab at actually dealing with the theme. The writer pool here is interesting as well, as many of these authors are better known for their work in fantasy or other genres. That is not to say that the book will have no value to hardcore science fiction readers, but they may have to dig for their gems. Readers with a firm belief on either side of the argument will likely find something to irritate and something to ponder. Reviewer: Lisa Martincik

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101136218
Publisher:
DAW
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
File size:
274 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Denise Little worked for Barnes&Noble/B. Dalton Bookseller for many years, first as a bookstore manager, then as their national book buyer for romance, science fiction, and fantasy fiction. She then joined Kensington Publishing, where she edited her own line of romance, Denise Little Presents. She's currently executive editor at Tekno Books.

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Intelligent Design 1.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Ruriksson More than 1 year ago
I picked this book up oyt of curriosity. I am a theist, I enjoy religious debate, I have studied evolutionary theories and I love anthropology. A book full of stories about the meeting of science and religion? Sounded great. It wasn't. The stories were amateurish, they used plot twists that stopped being clever when I was ten, an the philosophy was junk. The arguments in favor of intelligent design were not intelligent at all, and the debates between characters only worked because both sides were being written by the same person. If they tried these arguments with the average atheist they would be reduced to tears. In short, this book was poorly written, poorly thought out and in the end just lazy. Don't waste your time.
Queengeek More than 1 year ago
I'm a geek. Whenever I read anthologies, I mark the stories in the table of contents with one- to four-star ratings. When I finished INTELLIGENT DESIGN, I noticed that there were no four-star stories, a few three-star stories, and a preponderance of two-stars. Now, Denise Little is a good editor, and I've enjoyed quite a few of her anthologies from DAW Books, but this one is just...meh. I can't really blame the authors of the individual stores, it's just that the whole Intelligent Design idea is so silly, so contrived and just plain lame, that I don't think anyone could have written a great SF story around that idea. (There's a great story called THE PROPHET OF FLORES, by Ted Kosmatka, that illustrates what could be done with the idea. It's not included in this anthology, but it's well, well worth looking up.) Try Little's other anthologies, and you won't be disappointed. But this one just lays there like so much fish.