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Interacting with Geospatial Technologies / Edition 1

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Overview

Interacting with Geospatial Technologies provides an introduction to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and usability aspects of Geographical Information Technologies-from Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to web mapping applications. The book provides a clear introduction to the principles of HCI, a discussion about those special usability aspects of GIS which designers and developers need to take into account when developing such systems, and it offers a set of tried and tested frameworks, matrices and techniques that can be used within GIS projects.

This introductory text covers a range of topics, from the cognitive models of geographical representation to interface design. It provides the reader with frameworks and techniques that can be used and case studies in which these techniques have been used for computer mapping application.

Takes an integrative approach to the subject to draw together the latest developments in the field.

Carefully structured to introduce the general principles of HCI and usability research and provide the basic theory of spatial cognition, map reading and the fundamentals of cartographic principles.

Includes numerous case studies to show usability in practice for example, Desktop GIS, Web-based GIS and Geovisualization Systems along with more recognizable geographic technologies such as SatNav, Web maps and Mashups.

An invaluable reference for those people taking courses in GIS, Geoinformatics, Geomatic Engineering or Spatial Information management, as well as computer scientists and information systems designers.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470998243
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 5/24/2010
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 310
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 0.90 (d)

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Table of Contents

Preface ix

About the authors xi

How to use this book xiii

Acknowledgements xv

Section I Theory 1

Human-computer interaction and geospatial technologies - context Mordechai (Muki) Haklay Artemis Skarlaidou 3

1.1 Human-computer interaction and usability engineering background 4

1.2 Geographic Information Systems and science history 9

1.3 Human-Computer Interaction and GIScience research 13

Summary 16

Further reading 16

Revision questions 18

2 Human understanding of space Clare Davies Chao (Lily) Li Jochen Albrecht 19

2.1 Introduction 19

2.2 Spatial cognition: screen versus geography 19

2.3 Geographic spatial cognition - learning, understanding and recall 21

2.4 GIS in the outside environment: matching maps to geography 31

Summary 34

Further reading 34

Revision questions 35

3 Cartographic theory and principles Catherine (Kate) Emma Jones 37

3.1 Principles of cartographic representation 37

3.2 Impact of projections on map design 49

3.3 Impact of cartographic scale on map design 54

3.4 Generalization 59

Summary 65

Further reading 65

Revision questions 65

4 Computer-mediated communication, collaboration and groupware Mordechai (Muki) Haklay 67

4.1 Computer-mediated communication 68

4.2 Social dynamics and group decision-making issues 76

4.3 Computer Supported Collaborative Work and Groupware (CSCW) 78

4.4 Principles or collaborative GIS 80

Summary 86

Further reading 87

Revision questions 87

Section II Framework 89

5 User-centred design Mordechai (Muki) Haklay Annu-Maaria Nivala 91

5.1 Background 95

5.2 Principles 97

5.3 Applying user-centred design in geospatial technologies 101

5.4 Participatory design 103

Summary 105

Further reading 106

Revision questions 106

6 Usability engineering Mordechai (Muki) Haklay Artemis Skarlatidou Carolina Tobón 107

6.1 Background 107

6.2 Usability engineering and product development process 109

6.3 Understanding user requirements and needs 111

6.4 Application development 113

6.5 Evaluation and deployment 114

6.6 Usability engineering in research 117

Summary 122

Further reading 122

Revision questions 123

Section III Practicalities and Technique 125

7 Application planning Jochen Albrecht Clare Davies 127

7.1 GIS interface complexity 128

7.2 Task analysis in GIS 128

7.3 Formalized analysis of GIS user interfaces 134

7.4 User experience considerations 134

7.5 Task analysis as the basis for workflow management 136

7.6 Geo-scientific workflows and process models 138

7.7 Ontologies in support of application planning for the semantic web 141

Summary 142

Further reading 142

Revision questions 143

8 Practical cartography Catherine (Kate) Emma Jones 145

8.1 The role or symbology in map making 145

8.2 The role of colour in map making 146

8.3 Data classification - typo of maps and thematic mapping 159

8.4 Mapping conventions - map elements and layout 171

Summary 177

Further reading 178

Revision questions 178

9 Principles of interaction Jessica Wardlaw 179

9.1 Key elements of the theory of interaction for geospatial technologies 182

9.2 Basic elements of GUI 187

9.3 Some guidelines for designing a GIS interface 192

Summary 197

Revision questions 198

10 Evaluation and deployment Stephanie Larissa Marsh Mordechai (Muki) Haklay 199

10.1 Evaluation options - from usability laboratory to guerrilla usability 199

10.2 Evaluation techniques 201

10.3 Methodological consideration of usability techniques 218

Summary 220

Further reading 220

Revision questions 221

11 Single user environments: desktop to mobile Mordechai (Muki) Haklay (Lily) Chao Li 223

11.1 Technological considerations 223

11.2 Understanding the user context 229

11.3 Designing desktop applications 231

11.4 Mobile devices 240

Summary 242

Further reading 242

Revision questions 243

12 Web-mapping applications and HCI considerations for their design Artemis Skarlatidou 245

12.1 Overview of web-mapping 245

12.2 Web-mapping design and HCI considerations 250

Summary 263

Further reading 264

Revision questions 264

Bibliography 265

Index 289

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