Intermediality / Edition 1

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Overview


With the ever-growing proliferation of electronic and other popular media, the complexity of relationship between what students see and hear, what they believe and how they interact with one another underscores now, more than ever, the need for across-the-curriculum teaching of critical thinking, critical reading, and critical viewing skills. The emerging consensus is that teaching critical viewing skills bolsters students’ abilities in traditional disciplines, combats problems of youth apathy, violence, and substance abuse, and improves students’, parents, and teachers’ attitudes’ toward school.Intermediality: Teachers’ Handbook of Critical Media Literacy challenges the practice of teaching the classics and the canon of acceptable literary works far removed from students’ experiences, with emphasis on learning environment over the presentation of any specific or specified content. The authors, Ladislaus Semali and Ann Watts Pailliotet, present literacy education as “intermedial” in nature—it entails constructing connections among varying conceptions and sign systems. Reading printed texts requires more than simply decoding letters into words or sounds; it involves finding meaning, motive, structure, and affect. The same goes for reading the electronic text. The authors argue for the discourse of literacy to take up a critical stance by examining a whole wide array of texts that form the meaning-making process of the looming information age.Intermediality examines, extends, and synthesizes the existing literary definitions, texts, theories, processes, research and contexts. It brings into focus the possibilities of working with media texts to address questions adapted from linguists and literary educators. Thus, in this book, critical media literacy becomes a competency to read, interpret, and understand how meaning is made and derived from print, photographs and other electronic and graphic visuals.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Eleven contributions from teachers and academics present the case for teaching electronic media literacy in the schools. A variety of case studies using varied strategies are presented for such media as the Internet, television, and other texts and contexts. The goals of promoting multiculturalism and critical thinking are emphasized. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813334806
  • Publisher: Westview Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/1998
  • Series: Edge Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 252
  • Lexile: 1440L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 0.57 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 9.00 (d)

Meet the Author


Ladislaus M. Semaliis associate professor of education at The Pennsylvania State University, where he teaches media literacy to preservice teachers. He authored Postliteracy in the Age of Democracy and coedited What Is Indigenous Knowledge? Voices from the Academy. Ann Watts Pailliotet is assistant professor of education at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, where she teaches preservice literacy methods, critical reading of children's literature, and media literacy. She is a past winner of the National Reading Conference Student Outstanding Research Award and College Composition and Communication Citation for outstanding classroom practice.
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Table of Contents

Series Editors' Foreword
1 Introduction: What Is Intermediality and Why Study It in U.S. Classrooms? 1
2 Deep Viewing: Intermediality in Preservice Teacher Education 31
3 Intermediality in the Classroom: Learners Constructing Meaning Through Deep Viewing 53
4 Preservice Teachers' Collages of Multicultural Education 75
5 A Late-'60s Leftie's Lessons in Media Literacy: A Collaborative Learning Group Project for a Mass Communication Course 97
6 The Power and Possibilities of Video Technology and Intermediality 129
7 A Feminist Critique of Media Representation 141
8 Critical Media Literacy as an English Language Content Course in Japan 155
9 Critical Viewing as Response to Intermediality: Implications for Media Literacy 183
10 Intermediality, Hypermedia, and Critical Media Literacy 207
11 Afterword 223
About the Editors and Contributors 229
Index 233
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