Intermolecular forces: Hydrogen bond, Intermolecular force, Van der Waals radius, Hydrophobe, Van der Waals force, Force field

Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Hydrogen Bond, Intermolecular Force, Van Der Waals Radius, Hydrophobe, Van Der Waals Force, Hydrophile, Force Field, Atomic Force Microscopy, Quantum Mechanical Explanation of Intermolecular Interactions, Adhesive Surface Forces, Hydrophobicity Scales, Molecular Mechanics, Superhydrophobe, Hellmann-feynman Theorem, Pi ...

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Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Hydrogen Bond, Intermolecular Force, Van Der Waals Radius, Hydrophobe, Van Der Waals Force, Hydrophile, Force Field, Atomic Force Microscopy, Quantum Mechanical Explanation of Intermolecular Interactions, Adhesive Surface Forces, Hydrophobicity Scales, Molecular Mechanics, Superhydrophobe, Hellmann-feynman Theorem, Pi Interactions, Interbilayer Forces in Membrane Fusion, Anti-Graffiti Coating, Lennard-Jones Potential, Hydrophobic Effect, London Dispersion Force, Dispersive Adhesion, Adhesion, Surface Forces Apparatus, Optical Contact Bonding, Jacob Israelachvili, Cohesion, Hamaker Theory, Hamaker Constant, Buckingham Potential. Excerpt: Dew drops adhering to a spider web Adhesion is the tendency of certain dissimilar molecules to cling together due to attractive forces. In contrast, cohesion takes place between similar molecules. Mechanisms of adhesion Cohesion causes water to form drops , surface tension causes them to be nearly spherical, and adhesion keeps the drops in place. Water droplets are flatter on a Hibiscus flower which shows better adhesion. Five mechanisms of adhesion have been proposed to explain why one material sticks to another: Mechanical adhesion Adhesive materials fill the voids or pores of the surfaces and hold surfaces together by interlocking. Sewing forms a large scale mechanical bond, velcro forms one on a medium scale, and some textile adhesives form one at a small scale. This is similar to surface tension. Chemical adhesion Two materials may form a compound at the join. The strongest joins are where atoms of the two materials swap (ionic bonding ) or share (covalent bonding ) outer electrons. A weaker bond is formed if a Hydrogen atom in one molecule is attracted to an atom of Nitrogen , Oxygen , or Fluorine in another molecule, a phenomenon called H...

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781155455310
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 5/4/2010
  • Pages: 50
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.10 (d)

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