International Development: Ideas, Experience, and Prospects

Overview


Thinking on development informs and inspires the actions of people, organizations, and states in their continuous effort to invent a better world. This volume examines the ideas behind development: their origins, how they have changed and spread over time, and how they may evolve over the coming decades. It also examines how the real-life experiences of different countries and organizations have been inspired by, and contributed to, thinking on development. The extent to which development 'works' depends in part...
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International Development: Ideas, Experience, and Prospects

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Overview


Thinking on development informs and inspires the actions of people, organizations, and states in their continuous effort to invent a better world. This volume examines the ideas behind development: their origins, how they have changed and spread over time, and how they may evolve over the coming decades. It also examines how the real-life experiences of different countries and organizations have been inspired by, and contributed to, thinking on development. The extent to which development 'works' depends in part on particular local, historical, or institutional contexts. General policy prescriptions fail when the necessary conditions that make them work are either absent, ignored, or poorly understood. There is a need to grasp how people understand their own development experience. If the countries of the world are varied in every way, from their initial conditions to the degree of their openness to outside money and influence, and success is not centred in any one group, it stands to reason that there cannot be a single recipe for development.

Each chapter provides an analytical survey of thinking about development that highlights debates and takes into account critical perspectives. It includes contributions from scholars and practitioners from the global North and the global South, spanning at least two generations and multiple disciplines. It will be a key reference on the concepts and theories of development - their origins, evolution, and trajectories - and act as a resource for scholars, graduate students, and practitioners.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199671663
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 3/16/2014
  • Pages: 896
  • Product dimensions: 9.70 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 2.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Bruce Currie-Alder, Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa, Canada's International Development Research Centre,Ravi Kanbur, T. H. Lee Professor of World Affairs, International Professor of Applied Economics and Management, Professor of Economics, Cornell University,David M. Malone, Rector, United Nations University,Rohinton Medhora, President, Centre for International Governance Innovation

Bruce Currie-Alder is Regional Director, Middle East and North Africa, Cairo, Egypt. His work examines the governance of public research funding and scientific cooperation with developing countries. His past position within IDRC was Senior Policy Advisor and Chief of Staff, facilitating corporate strategy and contributing to Canada's foreign policy. Before joining IDRC in 2003, he worked on environmental management in the Mexican oil industry and published on grassroots natural resource management in Latin America. He holds a Master's in natural resource management from Simon Fraser University and a PhD in public policy from Carleton University.

Ravi Kanbur bridges the worlds of rigorous academic analysis and practical policy making in development economics. He has served at the World Bank in various roles, including resident representative in Ghana, Chief Economist of the African Region, Principal Advisor to the Chief Economist, and Director of the World Development Report. Professor Kanbur has taught at the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Essex, Warwick, Princeton, and Columbia. His work spans conceptual, empirical, and policy analysis, including more than 200 publications, many in leading journals. Kanbur is a graduate of the University of Cambridge and holds a DPhil in economics from the University of Oxford.

David M. Malone is Under-Secretary-General of the UN and Rector of the UN University (UNU) headquartered in Tokyo. Previously, he was President of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and prior to that the Canadian High Commissioner to India and non-resident Ambassador to Bhutan and Nepal. He has also been the President of the International Peace Academy (New York) and a Canadian ambassador to the United Nations. He joined Canada's Department of External Affairs in 1975 and served in Ottawa, Cairo, Amman, and New York. Malone is a graduate of Harvard and Oxford Universities, l'Universite de Montreal, and the American University in Cairo.

Rohinton Medhora is the President of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI). Previously Dr Medhora was Vice-President of Programs at Canada's International Development Research Centre, where he undertook a series of leadership roles, including directing the Social and Economic Policy program and heading programs related to international economic relations and economic policy. His publications include 'Financial Reform in Developing Countries and Finance and Competitiveness in Developing Countries'. Prior to IDRC, Dr Medhora was with the faculty of economics at University of Toronto, where he also earned his PhD.

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Table of Contents

Amartya Sen: Foreword
Preface
Bruce Currie-Alder, Ravi Kanbur, David M. Malone, and Rohinton Medhora: The State of Development Thought
Part 1. Critical Issues
1: David Williams: The Study of Development
2: John Harriss: Development Theories
3: Shahid Yusuf: Fifty Years of Growth Economics
4: Shanta Devarajan and Ravi Kanbur: Development Strategy: Balancing Market and Government Failure
5: David Hulme: Poverty in Development Thought: Symptom or Cause
6: Frances Stewart and Emma Samman: Inequality and Development
7: Irene Tinker and Elaine Zuckerman: Women's Economic Roles and the Development Paradigm
8: Maria Emma Santos and Georgina Santos: Composite Indices of Development
9: Patricia Rogers and Dugan Fraser: Development Evaluation
Part 2. Concepts and Theories
State and Society
10: Albert Berry: Growth, Inclusion, and Human Satisfaction
11: Armando Barrientos: Social Protection
12: Kevin Davis and Mariana Prado: Law, Regulation, and Development
13: Maivân Clech Lâm: Rooting Change: Indigeneity and Development
14: Huguette Labelle: Corruption
Economic
15: Richard Bird and Arindam Das-Gupta: Public Finance in Developing Countries
16: Justin Lin and Célestin Monga: The Evolving Paradigms of Structural Change
17: José Antonio Ocampo: Trade and Finance in Development Thinking
18: Wim Naudé: Entrepreneurship and Economic Development
19: Adekeye Adebajo: Two Prophets of Regional Integration: Prebisch and Adedeji
Peace and Security
20: Gilbert Khadiagala and Dimpho Motsamai: The Political Economy of IntraState Conflicts
21: Mats Berdal: Peacebuilding and Development
22: Keith Krause: Violence, Insecurity, and Crime in Development Thought
23: Charles Cater: The Resource Curse and Transparency
24: Pablo de Greiff: Transitional Justice and Development
Environment and Health
25: MS Swaminathan, R. Pandya-Lorch, and S. Yosef: Agriculture and Food Security
26: Cecilia Tortajada: Water Resources: An Evolving Landscape
27: Julio Berdegué, Tomas Rosada, and Anthony Bebbington: The Rural Transformation
28: Ben White, Saturnino Borras, and Ruth Hall: Land Reform
29: Fatima Denton: Climate Adaptation
30: Tim Evans: Global Health
31: Nandini Oomman and Farley Cleghorn: Targeting Diseases
Innovation and Technology
32: Michele Di Maio: Industrial Policy
33: José E. Cassiolato, Marcelo Matos, and Helena Lastres: Innovation Systems and Development
34: Bo Göransson, J. Sutz, and R. Arocena: Universities and Higher Education in Development
35: David Brook, Peter Singer, and Caitlyn MacMaster: Innovation for Development
36: Ronaldo Lemos and Joana Ferraz: Information and Communication Technologies for Development
Part 3. Experiences
Geographic Diversity
37: Simon Tay: The Asian Model of Development: From Crises to Transformation
38: Xue Lan and Ling Chen: China
39: Renato Flores: Brazil
40: Ernesto Ottone and Carlos Vergara: Chile
41: Mthuli Ncube, Abebe Shimeles, and Audrey Verdier-Chouchane: South Africa's Quest for Inclusive Development
42: Devesh Kapur: India's Economic Development
43: David Olusanya Ajakaiye and Afeikhena Jerome: Economic Development: The Experience of sub-Saharan Africa
44: Ahmed Galal and Hoda Selim: Economic Development in the Arab Region: A Tale of Oil and Politics
Development Actors
45: Celia and Jacques Kerstenetzky: The State as a Development Actor: State Forms of Social Transformation
46: Kumi Naidoo and Sylvia Borren: Civil Society
47: Carol Adelman and Yulya Spantchak: Foundations and Private Actors
48: Diana Tussie and Cintia Quiliconi: The World Trade Organization and Development
49: Danny Leipziger: The Role and Influence of International Financial Institutions
50: Homi Kharas: Development Assistance
51: Gregory Chin and Jorge Heine: Consultative Forums: State Power and Multilateral Institutions
52: Richard Jolly: Underestimated Influence: UN Contributions to Development Ideas, Leadership, Influence and Impact
Bruce Currie-Alder, Ravi Kanbur, David M. Malone, and Rohinton Medhora: Epilogue
Foreword, Amartya Sen
Preface
The State of Development Thought, Bruce Currie-Alder, Ravi Kanbur, David M. Malone, and Rohinton Medhora
Part 1. Critical Issues
1. The Study of Development, David Williams
2. Development Theories, John Harriss
3. Fifty Years of Growth Economics, Shahid Yusuf
4. Development Strategy: Balancing Market and Government Failure, Shanta Devarajan and Ravi Kanbur
5. Poverty in Development Thought: Symptom or Cause, David Hulme
6. Inequality and Development, Frances Stewart and Emma Samman
7. Women's Economic Roles and the Development Paradigm, Irene Tinker and Elaine Zuckerman
8. Composite Indices of Development, Maria Emma Santos and Georgina Santos
9. Development Evaluation, Patricia Rogers and Dugan Fraser
Part 2. Concepts and Theories
State and Society
10. Growth, Inclusion, and Human Satisfaction, Albert Berry
11. Social Protection, Armando Barrientos
12. Law, Regulation, and Development, Kevin Davis and Mariana Prado
13. Rooting Change: Indigeneity and Development, Maivan Clech Lam
14. Corruption, Huguette Labelle
Economic
15. Public Finance in Developing Countries, Richard Bird and Arindam Das-Gupta
16. The Evolving Paradigms of Structural Change, Justin Lin and Celestin Monga
17. Trade and Finance in Development Thinking, Jose Antonio Ocampo
18. Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, Wim Naude
19. Two Prophets of Regional Integration: Prebisch and Adedeji, Adekeye Adebajo
Peace and Security
20. The Political Economy of IntraState Conflicts, Gilbert Khadiagala and Dimpho Motsamai
21. Peacebuilding and Development, Mats Berdal
22. Violence, Insecurity, and Crime in Development Thought, Keith Krause
23. The Resource Curse and Transparency, Charles Cater
24. Transitional Justice and Development, Pablo de Greiff
Environment and Health
25. Agriculture and Food Security, MS Swaminathan, R. Pandya-Lorch, and S. Yosef
26. Water Resources: An Evolving Landscape, Cecilia Tortajada
27. The Rural Transformation, Julio Berdegue, Tomas Rosada, and Anthony Bebbington
28. Land Reform, Ben White, Saturnino Borras, and Ruth Hall
29. Climate Adaptation, Fatima Denton
30. Global Health, Tim Evans
31. Targeting Diseases, Nandini Oomman and Farley Cleghorn
Innovation and Technology
32. Industrial Policy, Michele Di Maio
33. Innovation Systems and Development, Jose E. Cassiolato, Marcelo Matos, and Helena Lastres
34. Universities and Higher Education in Development, Bo Gorannsson, J. Sutz, and R. Arocena
35. Innovation for Development, David Brook, Peter Singer, and Caitlyn MacMaster
36. Information and Communication Technologies for Development, Ronaldo Lemos and Joana Ferraz
Part 3. Experiences
Geographic Diversity
37. The Asian Model of Development: From Crises to Transformation, Simon Tay
38. China, Xue Lan and Ling Chen
39. Brazil, Renato Flores
40. Chile, Ernesto Ottone and Carlos Vergara
41. South Africa's Quest for Inclusive Development, Mthuli Ncube, Abebe Shimeles, and Audrey Verdier-Chouchane
42. India's Economic Development, Devesh Kapur
43. Economic Development: The Experience of sub-Saharan Africa, David Olusanya Ajakaiye and Afeikhena Jerome
44. Economic Development in the Arab Region: A Tale of Oil and Politics, Ahmed Galal and Hoda Selim
Development Actors
45. The State as a Development Actor: State Forms of Social Transformation, Celia and Jacques Kerstenetzky
46. Civil Society, Kumi Naidoo and Sylvia Borren
47. Foundations and Private Actors, Carol Adelman and Yulya Spantchak
48. The World Trade Organization and Development, Diana Tussie and Cintia Quiliconi
49. The Role and Influence of International Financial Institutions, Danny Leipziger
50. Development Assistance, Homi Kharas
51. Consultative Forums: State Power and Multilateral Institutions, Gregory Chin and Jorge Heine
52. Underestimated Influence: UN Contributions to Development Ideas, Leadership, Influence and Impact, Richard Jolly
Epilogue, Bruce Currie-Alder, Ravi Kanbur, David M. Malone, and Rohinton Medhora

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