International Law and the Possibility of a Just World Order: An Essay on Hegel's Universalism

Overview

This book examines the concepts of international law and international relations as they are developed in the social and political philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel. It considers traditional as well as contemporary criticisms of Hegel's views. It develops a "Hegelian" theory of international justice and a "Hegelian" conception of world order designed to accommodate both (a) the ethical value of, and differences among, national communities, and (b) the ethical value of individual freedom, and the equal entitlement of all...
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Overview

This book examines the concepts of international law and international relations as they are developed in the social and political philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel. It considers traditional as well as contemporary criticisms of Hegel's views. It develops a "Hegelian" theory of international justice and a "Hegelian" conception of world order designed to accommodate both (a) the ethical value of, and differences among, national communities, and (b) the ethical value of individual freedom, and the equal entitlement of all individuals to the basic rights of freedom. Hegel's controversial views on war and state sovereignty are also discussed, and the author attempts to show why these views do not undermine Hegel's basic internationalist and universalist aspirations. Despite Hegel's resistance to the potential abstractness and unmediated citizenship which a comprehensive (Kantian/cosmopolitan) theory of international law promises, his political philosophy ends with a vision of a single modern social world - a world in which peoples and nation - states can co-exist under conditions of peace, justice, mutual respect, and prosperity. In this regard, Hegel's understanding of social membership is shown to be far more universalistic than is often supposed by either his liberal cosmopolitan critics or his communitarian defenders.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
”Highly readable” in: Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain, Nos. 43/44, 2001
“… [a] carefully argued book … provides us with an invaluable view of Hegel” in: Ethics, January 2001
“… offers a major contribution towards a Hegelian version of political universalism, understood as a gradual formation of a world-community of nation-states. …Hicks contribution highly enriches the ongoing discussion on cosmopolitanism and it offers insights into a side of Hegel which is commonly neglected by communitarians as well as cosmopolitan liberals: the universalistic Hegel.” in: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (2000)
“… Hick’s heart is in the right place … Hegel does indeed still have to offer us much…” in: Interpretation - A Journal of Political Philosophy, Vol. 27, No. 3, Spring 2000
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789042004955
  • Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/29/2000
  • Series: Universal Justice Series
  • Pages: 272

Meet the Author

Steven V. Hicks is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Queens College of the City University of New York. He obtained his undergraduate degree in philosophy from Millsaps College, was a German Academic Exchange Scholar at the Hegel-Archiv, Ruhr Universität, Bochum, and received his Ph.D. from Columbia University for his dissertation “The Concept of the Person in Hegel’s System”. He is the author or co-author of a number of articles on Hegel and nineteenth-century German philosophy and literature, including “Hegel and Fontane on Social Substance” (Seminar, 1999); “Illusion and Dissolution: Fontane’s Stine” (German Studies Review, 1995); and “Hegel on International Law, International Relations, and the Possibility of World Community” (Dialogue and Universalism, 1995).
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Table of Contents

ONE Individualism, Communalism, and Universalism in Hegel's Ethical Thought. TWO Persons and International Law in Hegel. THREE Realist Objections to Hegel's Ideas on International Law and World Community. FOUR Hegel and Cosmopolitanism. FIVE The State and Beyond: The Possibility of World Community. SIX The Modern Polis and Its Limits. SEVEN Hegel and the Possibility of a Just World Order. EIGHT Conclusion. Notes. Bibliography. About the Author. Index.
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