Web Database Development for Windows Platforms

Overview

  • Planning for appropriate performance, scalability, and reliability
  • ADO, OLE DB, ODBC, JDBC, and ISAPI
  • Making the most of Active Server Pages
  • Detailed SQL Server and Microsoft Access coverage
  • Includes a complete Web database case study

Building Web databases with Microsoft technologies - start to finish!

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Overview

  • Planning for appropriate performance, scalability, and reliability
  • ADO, OLE DB, ODBC, JDBC, and ISAPI
  • Making the most of Active Server Pages
  • Detailed SQL Server and Microsoft Access coverage
  • Includes a complete Web database case study

Building Web databases with Microsoft technologies - start to finish!

This is the first complete sourcebook for anyone who wants to deploy Web databases using Microsoft technologies! Web Database Development for Windows Platforms introduces every important Microsoft technology associated with Web/intranet database development, helping you choose the right options, then walking you through deployment step by step.

You'll learn how to plan your database for appropriate performance, scalability, and reliability; how to make the most of Active Server Pages and Activex(r) Data Objects; and more. The book contains detailed coverage of powerful "shortcuts" such as the Internet Database Connector, IDC-to-ASP Converter, SQL Server Web Publisher Wizard, and more. Discover the best ways to build database connections with Visual J++ and the Windows Foundation Classes; and how to make the most of JDBC. There's also a full chapter on publishing databases with Microsoft Access, covering the Upsizing Wizard, the Publish to the Web Wizard, HTML customization with VBA, and much more.

For thousands of developers, Web managers, and other IT professionals faced with database-enabling their Internet applications, there's never been a better place to start.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The guide for low-end Web developers begins with an overview of available technologies, hardware and software issues, and how to create a simple Web database. It then explores specific development platforms such as Visual J++, cross platform JDBC, Active Server Pages, and ADO. After this, it looks at Microsoft's Visual InterDev tool, and shows some automated approaches for publishing desktop databases such as Access. The book concludes with a case study using the Cold Fusion CGI-based environment. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

As a database developer who grew up with the DOS Xbase environments (dBASE, FoxPro, and Clipper), and then moved to Microsoft Access upon its initial release, it made immediate sense to me that the marriage of the World Wide Web and database technology would one day occur. When I first witnessed the Web using the first Mosaic browser, I saw mostly static text content with some hypertext links using mile-long URLs. Hard as it was to imagine back then, I held out hope for the day when the Web would come alive with content emanating from databases. At the time, the tools just weren't there, and the pre-ODBC technology available at the time would only allow for custom approaches. Indeed, when I first began researching the prospect of publishing databases on the Web, in early 1994 there were only a handful of crude techniques for UNIX Web servers, but nothing widespread or refined enough to be considered a standard. Remember, at that time Microsoft hadn't awakened to the Internet, the Netscape browser was brand new, and HTML was still rapidly evolving.

I began collecting information on Internet database technology, much of which was publicly available on the Web, and in cutting-edge magazine articles and company white papers describing interesting new ways to connect a database to a Web site. I even wrote a couple of articles myself on the subject including "Developing Database Applications on the Internet" and "Link the Web with Your Relational Databases," both in the August 1995 issue of Data Based Advisor magazine (now known as e-Business Advisor from Advisor Publications, ....

There was one event that stood out in laying thecourse for Web databases running on the Microsoft Web platform. In 1995 I remember finding a startup company named Aspect Software Engineering operating out of a new technology park in Hawaii. The small group of young technophiles created a database enabling tool for the new Microsoft Web server IIS. The product, called dbWeb, was a first-of-breed technology enabling Web databases for the Windows NT platform. This product set the stage for a sustained period of innovation that continues today. Later, in 1996, I remember hearing that the company was acquired by Microsoft, presumably for riches beyond the imagination for the young principals (who had to move to rain soaked Redmond from the sun drenched beaches of Honolulu). I've been following the evolution of Web databases ever since.

Why This Book?

I wrote this book because I was continually asked by students, clients, and associates how to publish simple databases on the Web and how databases play a role in e-commerce. It is a natural question once one gets past the static nature of many Web sites. Since the people asking the question were not too Web savvy, their desire to publish a database on the Web was somewhat naive in terms of expectations. Why should it be any harder to view a Microsoft Access inventory table from a Web browser than from a PC desktop application? The answer, as we'll see in this book, centers around native HTML's inability to directly interface to a server database (although the emerging Dynamic HTML, known as DHTML, addresses this problem). Instead, some server-side development is required to implement database enabled Web sites. The technologies involved, however, are varied, and one of the purposes of this book is to provide an overview of the major ways to go about publishing a database on the Web for the Windows NT environment.

Still, we don't necessarily have to address these requirements from a highly technical perspective. Publishing a simple Access database takes some know-how, but not the level of technical awareness required to build a large complex e-commerce Web site. Thus, this book addresses the needs of the lower-end Web developer, possibly even a Web designer getting into dynamic content for the first time. There are plenty of other books on the market that cater to the higher-end developer. I wrote this book for the mass of developers who have standardized on the Windows Web platform, have all the necessary software on their servers, and are ready to experiment with Web databases.

Who Should Read This Book?

This book is directed towards corporate and independent developers who need to quickly get up to speed with contemporary ways to publish a database on a Web site for either the Internet or intranet using the Windows NT computing platform. The developer's company or client has already standardized on Microsoft Windows NT, Back Office, and Office and as a result already has most of the tools required to publish the database. Microsoft has made it much easier to facilitate Web databases by providing all the necessary technologies as part of existing mainstream product lines, e.g., the IIS Web server is part of Windows NT Server, SQL Server is part of Back Office, and Access is part of Office. All the tools are there, but the typical developer needs a place to start and a roadmap to outline the steps.

There are many such people in the target group for this book who just need to grasp the basics and who do not need to necessarily address the related though more advanced topics such a scalability, security and fire walls, transaction processing, application servers, etc. There are plenty of other books that focus on these areas. This book starts at the beginning.

How to Read This Book

The reader may approach the material found in this book in different ways depending on the specific Web database technologies she or he intends to use for future projects. Consequently, only certain chapters may be germane. If, for example, only Microsoft technologies are of interest, then the material describing JDBC in Chapter 6, which promotes cross platform Web database development, might be skipped. If the reader is not a programmer and wants to keep it that way, then some of the more automated HTML approaches would be appropriate (see the sections in Chapter 4 about the IIS Web Server's IDC feature and the SQL Server Web Assistant, or the section in Chapter 9 describing the Access Publish to the Web Wizard). If the reader is experienced with Microsoft Access VBA programming, then Chapter 9, which touches on custom HTML generation using VBA, has useful material. If the reader has a liking for the Java language and wants to build contemporary intranet applications, then Chapter 5 describing Visual J++ offers an important direction. Certainly, if the reader is an experienced programmer and wants to adopt favored technologies for the IIS Web server, Chapter 7 on Active Server and ADO and Chapter 8 on Visual InterDev will provide the most useful information.

Regardless of the reader's direction or goals, the CGI case study, based on Cold Fusion and found in Chapter 10, will be helpful in seeing the process of publishing a database on the Web from start to finish.

From frequent comments by my UCLA students, I've also found that the hardware issues discussed in Chapter 3 are often a complete mystery to the beginner, and this material should dispel many questions.

Lastly, for those readers using SQL Server as the back-end database for holding Web data, the SQL Server for NT section in Chapter 3 represents some real-life experience I obtained while doing a large e-commerce Web site.

How This Book Is Organized

This book starts at the very beginning, covering the basics with respect to setting up a database enabled Web site. I present an overview of available technologies, cover hardware and software issues, and demonstrate how to create a simple Web database. Many books do not take the time to present exactly how to get started, but rather assumes the reader has already taken the first steps, or has personnel to assist in getting started. I make no such assumptions. I then get into specific development platforms such as Microsoft Visual J++, cross platform JDBC, Active Server Pages and ADO. After this, we look at the Microsoft tool specifically designed for creating database Web sites, Visual InterDev, and show some automated approaches for publishing desktop databases such as Access. I wrap up the book by presenting a complete case study using the Cold Fusion CGI-based environment.

Chapter 1 - expands on this Preface by setting the stage for presenting your options for building a database-enabled Web site. This chapter represents "ground zero" for important establishing directions when building a Web database.

Chapter 2 - defines a number of technical areas upon which Web database technology is based, including discussions of CGI, server API platforms, server side includes, Java, and Microsoft Active Server technologies.

Chapter 3 - discusses special hardware considerations for implementing a Web site having database connections. This chapter is crucial for departmental staff having little or no IS support within their organization or independent developers who are new to the Web.

Chapter 4 - focuses on building simple database sites using tools integrated into Windows NT and SQL Server such as the Internet Database Connector and the SQL Server Web Assistant.

Chapter 5 - highlights the Microsoft Visual J++ development environment for creating Windows-based intranet applications using the Microsoft Windows Foundation Classes.

Chapter 6 - overviews the JDBC API from Sun as a technique for connecting databases to Web sites requiring cross platform capabilities.

Chapter 7- introduces the Microsoft Active Server platform including a description of the Active Server Pages programming environment that uses server-side VBScript programming.

Chapter 8 - provides a reference for the Microsoft Visual InterDev tool that is part of the Visual Studio suite. InterDev is the primary tool from Microsoft that enables the integration of ASP code and data connections.

Chapter 9 - shows how to publish desktop databases using a variety of techniques including Access Publish to the Web Wizard.

Chapter 10 - presents a case study that examines the design and implementation of an actual Web database using the Cold Fusion CGI-based tool.

A Goal for the Reader

As a writer, the surest indication that I've done my job of disseminating information is for my readers to use the material I've provided. Therefore, my goal for the reader is to actually publish a database on the Web using one or more of the technologies and techniques discussed in this book. Start small by creating a simple intranet application that prompts the user for some selection criteria, runs a query, and displays some results in HTML. Or try building a guest registration page for your current Web site and save the form contents in a database. The hardest part of embracing any new technology is getting your feet wet, but once you gain the experience, you'll wonder how you ever got along without database-enabled Web sites.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Internet Databases: A Natural Evolution.
From the Desktop to the Webtop. The Rise of the Wintel Platform on the Web. Developmental Directions. Static Content Prevails. Technology Directions. Database Connectivity Standards. Java-Based Development. Scripting Language-Based Development. Back-end Relational Databases. The Standalone Web Database. Organization-Wide LAN/WAN. Interfacing to Legacy Hardware and Database Systems. Back-end Focus for This Book. Revamped Back-end Licensing Fees. Object and Object/Relational Databases. Intranets and Extranets. Databases: Basis for Web Commerce. Extraordinary Opportunity for Software Developers. Tools for Web Database Developers. Sample Database-Enabled Web Sites. Infinite Humanity. The Real Estate Book. UCLA Store Bookseller E-Commerce Site. Summary.

2. Web Database Technical Overview.
HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Common Gateway Interface. Generic Database Scenario. Visual Basic/CGI Interface. Database Design. Stored Procedures. HTML. Visual Basic CGI Application Code. CGI Database Scripting. HTML Forms. SQL. ODBC. Database Markup Language. Server API. Server API Overview. ISAPI. Internet Database Connector. Server Side Includes (SSI). Technical Components. Config Command. Include Command. Echo Command. Fsize Command. Flastmod Command. Exec Command. Database SSI Extensions. SQL SELECT. SQL INSERT. Java Database Connections. JDBC. DAO. Active Server. Activex Data Objects. Summary.

3. Hardware/Software Requirements.
Choosing a Hosting Solution. Hosted Web Site. Co-LocatedWeb Servers. In-House Web Servers. Scalability. Web Server Hardware Platform. Intel Processor Based. High-Speed CPU Cache. Internal Cache. External Cache. Pipeline Burst Cache. Write-Back L1 and L2 Cache. Conventional RAM Requirements. Hard Disk. CD-ROM. Backup Methods. Power Considerations. Internet Connection and Communication Hardware. Point-to-Point. Frame Relay. ISDN. Dedicated SLIP/PPP. DSL. Router. CSU/DSU. Hub. Bandwidth Requirements Analysis. TCP/IP Intranet Test Case. Windows NT 4.0 Server. CPU Performance. Memory Tuning. Virtual Memory. Hard Disk Fragmentation. Monitoring Site Connections. Web Server Software. Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS). SQL Server for NT. Database Capacity. Performance Tuning. RAM Considerations. Cache Memory. SQL Server Performance Monitor. SQL Trace. Stored Procedures. Temporary Database Size. Query Optimization Analysis. Web Application Analysis. Summary.

4. Building Webtop Databases.
Internet Database Connector (IDC). IDC Architecture. Creating ODBC DSNs. IDC Processing Walk-Through. Database Design. Choosing a Design Tool. Building Database Schemas. Creating an ODBC Data Source. Converting Access Objects. Getting the Most from Stored Procedures. Query Design. Designing Queries. Internet Database Connector (.idc) Files. Retrieving Result-Sets. HTML Extension (.htx) Files. Detail Sections. Conditional Logic. Built-In Variables. Parameters from IDC Files. HTTP Variables. IDC Development Techniques. Multiple Select List Box. Parameter Passing. Counting. Adding Records. Drill Down. Batch and Multiple Queries. IDC-to-ASP Converter. SQL Server Web Assistant. Build a Query from the Database Hierarchy. Enter a Query as Free-Form Text. Use a Query in a Stored Procedure. Scheduling Options. File Options. Formatting Options. Summary.

5. Database Connections with Visual J++.
Visual J++ Overview. WFC. DHTML. RAD Components. Target Audience. Windows Foundation Classes (WFC). WFW and COM. WFC Classes. GUI Classes. System Classes. Data Classes. DHTML Classes. Security. WFC Designer. Data Access. DataSource Control. DataBinder Control. DataNavigator Control. DataGrid Control. Universal Data Access. ADO for Java. Connection Object. Command Object. Parameter Object. Recordset Object. Field Object. Error Object. Collections. Parameters. Fields. Errors. Remoteable Recordsets. JADO Event Handling. Data Form Wizard. Data Form Wizard-Generated Code. Starting and Stopping an Application. Basic Application Structure. Handling Events. Visual Database Tools. Summary.

6. JDBC.
JDBC Fundamentals. General Design Goals. Distributed Models. The JDBC Vision. The ODBC Influence. JDBC Technical Goals. Primary JDBC Classes. DriverManager Class. Database URLs. Connection Class. Statement Class. PreparedStatement Class. CallableStatement Class. ResultSet Class. Using Database MetaData. ResultSetMetaData Class. DatabaseMetaData Class. Implementing a Driver. Security Model. Coding Examples. A SELECT Example. UPDATE Example. Summary.

7. Active Server and ADO.
Activex Scripting. Active Server Framework. Activex. Active Desktop. Active Server. Active Server Pages. Server-Side Includes. Active Server Objects. Application Object. Session Object. Request Object. Response Object. Server Object. Active Server Components. Advertisement Rotator Component. Browser Capabilities Component. Content Linking Component. Database Access Component. File Access Component. Text Stream Component. Creating Server Components with VB. Visual InterDev Data Form Wizard. TableNameAction.asp. TableNameForm.asp. TableNameList.asp. COM/DCOM. Introduction to OLE DB. Components of an OLE DB Application. Activex Data Objects (ADO). ADO Features. ADO Integration. ADO Objects. Connection Object. Methods. Properties. Recordset Object. Methods. Properties. Command Object. Methods. Properties. Field Object. Methods. Properties. Parameter Objects. Methods. Properties. ADO Error Handling. Errors Collection. Error Object. Connection Pooling with ADO. ADO Examples. Using Connection, Command, and Recordset Objects. Open a Recordset. Invoke a Stored Procedure. Perform a Batch Update. Summary.

8. Visual InterDev.
Basic Architecture. Web Projects. Creating and Editing a Web Project. HTML Files. Global File. Graphic Image and Multimedia Files. Active Server Pages. Activex Layout Files. Workspaces. Establishing Database Connectivity. Database Project. Database Wizards. Database Connection Wizard. New Database Wizard. Data Form Wizard. Data Range Builder Wizard. Inserting a New Database Item. Design-Time Activex Controls. Data Command Design-Time Control. Inserting a Data Command Control. Configuring a Data Command Control. Creating a Data Command Control Using Drag and Drop. Data Range Header and Footer Design-Time Controls. Visual Data Tools. Data View. Table Structure Maintenance. Table Properties Dialog. Table Properties. Relationship Properties. Index/Keys Properties. Views. Stored Procedures. Database Designer. Database Diagrams. Creating a Database Diagram. Table Structure Changes. Query Designer. Diagram Pane. Query Designer Toolbar. Grid Pane. SQL Pane. Executing the Query. Stored Procedures. Stored Procedure Editor. Executing Stored Procedures. ODBC Script Files. Scalability. Summary.

9. Publishing Desktop Databases.
Microsoft Access as an ODBC Data Source. Using an ODBC Data Source. Inefficiencies Using Desktop ODBC Data Sources. Microsoft Access 97 Upsizing Tools. Upsizing Wizard. Create New SQL Server Database. Selecting Tables and Upsizing Options. Completing the Upsizing Process. Special Considerations for Upsized Data. SQL Server Browser. Static Database Content Web Page Generation. Microsoft Access 97. General Web Facilities. Hyperlink Data Type. Publish to the Web Wizard. Designing Your Own Publish to the Web Wizard Templates. The WebBrowser Control. VBA Programming with Web-Enabled Macro Actions. Custom HTML Generation Using VBA for Access. A Static Database Content Desktop Implementation Case Study. Summary.

10. Web Database Case Study.
A CGI Scripting Solution with ODBC. Using the Chinese Yellow Pages. Browse Mode. Search Mode. Hardware Implementation. System Software Implementation. Application Software Implementation. Database Design. Cold Fusion Implementation. Browse Mode Implementation. Search Mode Implementation. Summary.

Index.
Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

As a database developer who grew up with the DOS Xbase environments (dBASE, FoxPro, and Clipper), and then moved to Microsoft Access upon its initial release, it made immediate sense to me that the marriage of the World Wide Web and database technology would one day occur. When I first witnessed the Web using the first Mosaic browser, I saw mostly static text content with some hypertext links using mile-long URLs. Hard as it was to imagine back then, I held out hope for the day when the Web would come alive with content emanating from databases. At the time, the tools just weren't there, and the pre-ODBC technology available at the time would only allow for custom approaches. Indeed, when I first began researching the prospect of publishing databases on the Web, in early 1994 there were only a handful of crude techniques for UNIX Web servers, but nothing widespread or refined enough to be considered a standard. Remember, at that time Microsoft hadn't awakened to the Internet, the Netscape browser was brand new, and HTML was still rapidly evolving.

I began collecting information on Internet database technology, much of which was publicly available on the Web, and in cutting-edge magazine articles and company white papers describing interesting new ways to connect a database to a Web site. I even wrote a couple of articles myself on the subject including "Developing Database Applications on the Internet" and "Link the Web with Your Relational Databases," both in the August 1995 issue of Data Based Advisor magazine (now known as e-Business Advisor from Advisor Publications, ....

There was one event that stood out in layingthecourse for Web databases running on the Microsoft Web platform. In 1995 I remember finding a startup company named Aspect Software Engineering operating out of a new technology park in Hawaii. The small group of young technophiles created a database enabling tool for the new Microsoft Web server IIS. The product, called dbWeb, was a first-of-breed technology enabling Web databases for the Windows NT platform. This product set the stage for a sustained period of innovation that continues today. Later, in 1996, I remember hearing that the company was acquired by Microsoft, presumably for riches beyond the imagination for the young principals (who had to move to rain soaked Redmond from the sun drenched beaches of Honolulu). I've been following the evolution of Web databases ever since.

Why This Book?

I wrote this book because I was continually asked by students, clients, and associates how to publish simple databases on the Web and how databases play a role in e-commerce. It is a natural question once one gets past the static nature of many Web sites. Since the people asking the question were not too Web savvy, their desire to publish a database on the Web was somewhat naive in terms of expectations. Why should it be any harder to view a Microsoft Access inventory table from a Web browser than from a PC desktop application? The answer, as we'll see in this book, centers around native HTML's inability to directly interface to a server database (although the emerging Dynamic HTML, known as DHTML, addresses this problem). Instead, some server-side development is required to implement database enabled Web sites. The technologies involved, however, are varied, and one of the purposes of this book is to provide an overview of the major ways to go about publishing a database on the Web for the Windows NT environment.

Still, we don't necessarily have to address these requirements from a highly technical perspective. Publishing a simple Access database takes some know-how, but not the level of technical awareness required to build a large complex e-commerce Web site. Thus, this book addresses the needs of the lower-end Web developer, possibly even a Web designer getting into dynamic content for the first time. There are plenty of other books on the market that cater to the higher-end developer. I wrote this book for the mass of developers who have standardized on the Windows Web platform, have all the necessary software on their servers, and are ready to experiment with Web databases.

Who Should Read This Book?

This book is directed towards corporate and independent developers who need to quickly get up to speed with contemporary ways to publish a database on a Web site for either the Internet or intranet using the Windows NT computing platform. The developer's company or client has already standardized on Microsoft Windows NT, Back Office, and Office and as a result already has most of the tools required to publish the database. Microsoft has made it much easier to facilitate Web databases by providing all the necessary technologies as part of existing mainstream product lines, e.g., the IIS Web server is part of Windows NT Server, SQL Server is part of Back Office, and Access is part of Office. All the tools are there, but the typical developer needs a place to start and a roadmap to outline the steps.

There are many such people in the target group for this book who just need to grasp the basics and who do not need to necessarily address the related though more advanced topics such a scalability, security and fire walls, transaction processing, application servers, etc. There are plenty of other books that focus on these areas. This book starts at the beginning.

How to Read This Book

The reader may approach the material found in this book in different ways depending on the specific Web database technologies she or he intends to use for future projects. Consequently, only certain chapters may be germane. If, for example, only Microsoft technologies are of interest, then the material describing JDBC in Chapter 6, which promotes cross platform Web database development, might be skipped. If the reader is not a programmer and wants to keep it that way, then some of the more automated HTML approaches would be appropriate (see the sections in Chapter 4 about the IIS Web Server's IDC feature and the SQL Server Web Assistant, or the section in Chapter 9 describing the Access Publish to the Web Wizard). If the reader is experienced with Microsoft Access VBA programming, then Chapter 9, which touches on custom HTML generation using VBA, has useful material. If the reader has a liking for the Java language and wants to build contemporary intranet applications, then Chapter 5 describing Visual J++ offers an important direction. Certainly, if the reader is an experienced programmer and wants to adopt favored technologies for the IIS Web server, Chapter 7 on Active Server and ADO and Chapter 8 on Visual InterDev will provide the most useful information.

Regardless of the reader's direction or goals, the CGI case study, based on Cold Fusion and found in Chapter 10, will be helpful in seeing the process of publishing a database on the Web from start to finish.

From frequent comments by my UCLA students, I've also found that the hardware issues discussed in Chapter 3 are often a complete mystery to the beginner, and this material should dispel many questions.

Lastly, for those readers using SQL Server as the back-end database for holding Web data, the SQL Server for NT section in Chapter 3 represents some real-life experience I obtained while doing a large e-commerce Web site.

How This Book Is Organized

This book starts at the very beginning, covering the basics with respect to setting up a database enabled Web site. I present an overview of available technologies, cover hardware and software issues, and demonstrate how to create a simple Web database. Many books do not take the time to present exactly how to get started, but rather assumes the reader has already taken the first steps, or has personnel to assist in getting started. I make no such assumptions. I then get into specific development platforms such as Microsoft Visual J++, cross platform JDBC, Active Server Pages and ADO. After this, we look at the Microsoft tool specifically designed for creating database Web sites, Visual InterDev, and show some automated approaches for publishing desktop databases such as Access. I wrap up the book by presenting a complete case study using the Cold Fusion CGI-based environment.

Chapter 1 - expands on this Preface by setting the stage for presenting your options for building a database-enabled Web site. This chapter represents "ground zero" for important establishing directions when building a Web database.

Chapter 2 - defines a number of technical areas upon which Web database technology is based, including discussions of CGI, server API platforms, server side includes, Java, and Microsoft Active Server technologies.

Chapter 3 - discusses special hardware considerations for implementing a Web site having database connections. This chapter is crucial for departmental staff having little or no IS support within their organization or independent developers who are new to the Web.

Chapter 4 - focuses on building simple database sites using tools integrated into Windows NT and SQL Server such as the Internet Database Connector and the SQL Server Web Assistant.

Chapter 5 - highlights the Microsoft Visual J++ development environment for creating Windows-based intranet applications using the Microsoft Windows Foundation Classes.

Chapter 6 - overviews the JDBC API from Sun as a technique for connecting databases to Web sites requiring cross platform capabilities.

Chapter 7- introduces the Microsoft Active Server platform including a description of the Active Server Pages programming environment that uses server-side VBScript programming.

Chapter 8 - provides a reference for the Microsoft Visual InterDev tool that is part of the Visual Studio suite. InterDev is the primary tool from Microsoft that enables the integration of ASP code and data connections.

Chapter 9 - shows how to publish desktop databases using a variety of techniques including Access Publish to the Web Wizard.

Chapter 10 - presents a case study that examines the design and implementation of an actual Web database using the Cold Fusion CGI-based tool.

A Goal for the Reader

As a writer, the surest indication that I've done my job of disseminating information is for my readers to use the material I've provided. Therefore, my goal for the reader is to actually publish a database on the Web using one or more of the technologies and techniques discussed in this book. Start small by creating a simple intranet application that prompts the user for some selection criteria, runs a query, and displays some results in HTML. Or try building a guest registration page for your current Web site and save the form contents in a database. The hardest part of embracing any new technology is getting your feet wet, but once you gain the experience, you'll wonder how you ever got along without database-enabled Web sites.

Read More Show Less

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