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The Internet for Busy People
     

The Internet for Busy People

by Christian Crumlish
 

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Combined sales for the first two editions of Internet for Busy People are over 100,000. Geared toward graphic art professionals,this best-selling Photoshop book includes 32 pages of dazzling,vibrant artwork from practicing Photshop professionals. Use easy-to-follow,step-by-step procedures and visuals to create amazing effects in just minutes,just like the pros at

Overview

Combined sales for the first two editions of Internet for Busy People are over 100,000. Geared toward graphic art professionals,this best-selling Photoshop book includes 32 pages of dazzling,vibrant artwork from practicing Photshop professionals. Use easy-to-follow,step-by-step procedures and visuals to create amazing effects in just minutes,just like the pros at leading graphic design and ad firms.

Free tutorial images available from the Photoshop Image Bank on the Osborne Web site—8,000+ downloads from the Third Edition Image Bank.

The book to use when there's no time to lose! This book has helped nearly 100,000 people get wired—and now The Internet for Busy People is back to guide you toward a richer,more productive online experience! Following highly visual,step-by-step lessons,you'll master the latest browsers,tools,and technologies and become skilled at everything from sending private entail and searching to viewing live news broadcasts at your desktop. Chat with a friend or an entire group in plain text or vivid 3-D surroundings. Create simple Web pages or glossy Web sites with dynamic HTML effects,using tools like FrontPage and Macromedia DreamWeaver. Discover dozens of new examples and links to make your Web explorations more exciting and fruitful!

Busy People Books: Designed to put you in control. Get where you want to go—faster—using these visually powerful learning tools found in every Busy People book! BUSY PEOPLE BLUEPRINTS: Easy to spot in the front of every Busy People book,these eye-catching schematics shows important software features in action. Use them to check out which functions you should learn for maximum results!FAST FORWARDS: Zoom into learning with chapter-opening previews that focus on the most essential features in each section. An ideal way to learn in a snap—or a quick refresher course when you're on the go! STEP-BY-STEP

TUTORIALS: Learn Internet by the numbers with these lively annotated figures that help you master complex tasks at a glance. Built into almost every chapter,they're just like having private lessons from an expert!

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
These three latest series entries live up to the "for busy people" standards: they are well organized and illustrated and aimed directly at working people who need to get specific jobs done quickly. The task-oriented approach covers topics such as searching, making presentations, sharing information, and finding lost files among many others. These three also happen to cover some of the hottest basic tools right now. These very practical and useful guides belong in most collections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780078821080
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Osborne
Publication date:
12/28/1995
Series:
Busy People Series
Pages:
241
Product dimensions:
7.39(w) x 9.15(h) x 0.81(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Living on the Web

In the past few years, most of us have been getting busier and busier, feeling more stress from work and family and relationship obligations, and maybe even feeling that we're falling further behind in some areas. I'm sorry to report that the Internet will probably not alleviate your pressure. It won't put more hours in the day or help you prioritize. It can easily become a time sink, an always-ready source of low-level self-distraction. If you thought solitaire or Tetris was addictive, then approach the Internet with care!

Now, I don't want to paint myself as some sort of whistle-blowing naysayer. I'm a card-carrying Internet addict, and I have trouble imagining how I could conduct my life without it. Then again, I work in this business, and I learned long ago that my enthusiasm is not universal. The fact is, I'm part of the Internet-hype economy. Much as I'd like to deny it, I'm out in front in a barker's uniform ushering you in. Fine, that's my role and it pays the rent, but as you enter the tent let me just warn you to keep your wallet tightly gripped and be careful with your time.

The Internet: A Network of Networks

Most of us are too busy to spend all day discussing the history and technology of the Internet and all the fascinating trivia associated with it. You can get those anecdotes anywhere. (For that matter, you can get them for free once you're on the Net.) Suffice it to say, the Internet is not really a coherent network in the same sense as a local area network, such as you might find in an office, or a wide area network, like you might find on a university campus.

Actually, the Internet is a loosely and redundantlylinked collection of smaller networks and individual computers, all of which agree to share (some) information using the various Internet protocols as a lingua franca.

If you ask what the Internet is like or how it works, you'll get a range of answers obtainable from blind men touching different parts of an elephant. The Internet is like a cloud. The Internet is like a web. The Internet is like a tree. I suggest you think of the Internet as a black box. Stuff goes in one end and comes out the other. Forget trying to figure out what happens in the middle. Why did the chicken choose a particular path through the Internet? To get to the other side.

The most important advance in making the Internet easy and convenient to explore has been the development of the World Wide Web (a method for viewing much of the Internet) and elegant programs called web browsers that enable you to view and thumb through the myriad sources of information, communication, and software out there.

Browsing the Internet is a simple matter of running one of these programs and jumping to a destination. Because of the flexibility of the web medium, you can even use a web browser to gain access to items that are out there somewhere on the Internet, but not directly on the Web. The web browser acts as a sort of umbrella interface for the entire Internet.

If CNN and ESPN have some of the most popular, most expensive, most close-to-supporting-themselves-via-advertising web sites, does this mean that the Web is really a new kind of TV? No, it doesn't, but those who have thrived in the one-to-many media model would like to emphasize those capacities of the Internet. Others would argue that the Net is inherently many-to-many and must naturally evolve differently from TV...

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