Internet Telephony: Call Processing Protocols / Edition 1

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Overview

The key source for the principal Internet telephony services and standards.

The Internet now handles extensive video, teleconferencing, fax, and voice communications, in addition to basic data transfer. But overlapping standards for mixed media transmissions can confuse even the most sophisticated engineers. Experienced telecom leader Uyless Black brings together all the tools and protocols for call processing in this single authoritative source.

Internet Telephony begins with an overview of basic telephony call processing, focussing on the differences between traditional circuit switching and the more contemporary packet-based networks. A special section discusses telephony routing over IP. Along the way, Black explores the major standards and protocols in detail. Highlights include:

  • H.323: the ITU standard for transmitting mixed media signals via LANS and WANs
  • SIP: the IETF's Session Initiation Protocol used for IP teleconferencing
  • Megaco Protocol: a combined IETF/ITU standard for multimedia conferencing
  • MGCP: a call processing protocol, published as an informational RFC

For engineers, managers, or users, Internet Telephony is the one book to cover all the technologies.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Written for engineers, managers, and users, this book begins with an overview of basic telephony call processing, focusing on the differences between traditional circuit switching and more contemporary packet-based networks. A special section discusses telephony routing over IP. Major standards and protocols are described in detail. Particular attention is given to H.323, SIP, Megaco Protocol, and MGCP. Black is a consultant, and author, and a lecturer on computer networks and data communications. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

This book is one in a series of books called, "Advanced Communications Technologies." As the name of the book implies, the focus is on Internet telephony and protocols that support call processing. The book is an expansion of Advanced Features of the Internet, also part of this series.

The book has been written as a follow-up to the book in this series titled Voice Over IP (VOIP).

While the call processing protocols described in this book are oriented toward telephone calls, they also support calls associated with data and video connections. Examples of their support for all these applications are provided in several chapters.

I hope you find this book a valuable addition to your library.

Notes to the Reader

There are four major IP-based Call Processing Protocols being deployed in the industry: H.323, SIP, MGCP, and Megaco. The chapters in this book that deal with other subjects are included because they deal with and support these four protocols.

There are many examples of protocol flows in this book that illustrate how the call processing messages are transported between the call processing nodes. I have prepared some of them, and others are sourced from the Internet RFCs, IETF working papers, and the ISO/ITU-T Recommendations.

These documents use different notations and figures to illustrate the flows. For continuity and to aid your study of these flows, I have modified some of them so that all are similar.

However, in some instances, I left the flows as they are described in the original specification if my potential alteration would have changed the interpretation of thespecification in question. For example, some of the authors of the specifications use one "event" to show a message flow though multiple nodes; others describe an event for each instance of the flow at each node. I kept these practices intact; in the event you decide to study the actual specification along with the book, you will find both are consistent.

So, if you do detect some minor differences in my presentations of these important flows, they are there for this reason. Overall, you will find they are quite similar.

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Table of Contents

(NOTE: EACH CHAPTER CONCLUDES WITH A SUMMARY.)
1. Introduction.

Introduction. Movement to Packet-based Networks and Internet Architectures. The Growth Segment: Data Networks. Why IP Call Processing? Savings thus Far in Internet Telephony? Beyond Internet Telephony. What is Call Processing? Emergence of IP-based Media Gateways and Gateway Controllers. Concept of a Calling Domain. The Principal IP Call Processing Protocols. The Mier Survey. A Look at the Internet Telephony Industry.

2. The Telephone Network.
Introduction. Goals of a Telephone System. The Telephone Plant. The Media to the Customer. A More Detailed Look at the Outside Plant. Offices and Trunks. The Telephone Dialing Plan. Basics of Telephony Call Processing. Example of a Call. Multifrequency (MF) Signals. DTMF Signaling. Other Tones and Events on the Subscriber Line. Examples of Call Processing Operations. ISDN. SS7.

3. The Internet.
Introduction. The Protocol Suite. Names and Addresses. A Brief Look at IP. A Brief Look at TCP and UDP. The Domain Name System (DNS). The DNS Root Servers. HTTP, HTML.

4. The Internet Call Processing Model.
Introduction. The Gateway/Gatekeeper/Media Gateway Controller Model. A Unified View. The Signaling Gateway in More Detail. The Internet Layered Model and the Internet Call Processing Model.

5. Session Description Protocol (SDP).
Introduction. SDP Functions. Attributes. Text-based vs. BinaryEncoding. SDP Descriptions. SDP Lines of Text. The SDP Information. Examples of SDP Coding.

6. Multicasting.
Introduction. Multicasting Concepts. Multicasting Addresses. IGMP and IP. The IGMP Message. IGMP Operations. Relationships of Multicasting and Unicasting Addresses. Multicasting Tables. IGMP State Diagrams. IGMP Timers. Options for Multicast Addresses in a Session Description. Small Group Multicast (SGM).

7. The Real Time Protocol (RTP).
Introduction. Attributes of the Real Time Protocol (RTP). The Real Time Control Protocol (RTCP). Translation and Mixing. The RTP Message. RTP Profiles for Audio and Video Conferences (RFC 1890). Sample-Based and Frame-Based Encodings. RTP Payload for Telephony Traffic. RTP Payload for H.263 Video. Appendix 7A References for RTP Payload Types. Appendix 7B Other References on Current RTP Activity.

8. H.323.
Introduction. Design Intent of H.323. H.323 Architecture. Zones. The H.323 Protocol Stack. Relationship to Megaco and MGCP. The Multipoint Control Unit (MCU). The Major Operations. The H.323 Message Coding Conventions. Gatekeeper Discovery. Registration Procedures. Admission Procedures. Gatekeeper Routed Call Signaling. Direct Endpoint Call Signaling. Other Gatekeeper Routed Call Operations. Endpoints Registered to Different Gateways. Multipoint Conferences. Other RAS Procedures. Major H.245 Services. Bandwidth Change Request. Conference Creation Operation. The T.120 Specifications. Extensibility. Other Thoughts.

9. MGCP.
Introduction. MGCP Concepts. The Call Agent. MGCP Gateway Components. Events and Packages. The Ten Packages. Endpoints. Connection States. Local Directives and Session Descriptions. MGCP Modes. The Applications Programming Interface (API). Rules on Connection Identifiers. The Message Parameters. The MGCP Message Format. Security Services. Example of MGCP Protocol Exchanges.

10. Megaco.
Introduction. Status of Megaco. Structure of Megaco. The Megaco Connection Model. Megaco Packages in More Detail. Megaco Commands. Megaco Names. The Application Programming Interface (API). Examples of Megaco Protocol Exchanges. Megaco IP Phone Media Gateway. The Megaco MIB. Security Services.

11. The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP).
Introduction. SIP Features. The Five Major Features of SIP. Protocol Placement of SIP. Clarification of Terms. SIP Status Codes. Example of a Request/Response Operation. The SIP Methods. SIP's Use of Internet Resources. SIP Message Coding Conventions. The Via Operation. SIP Headers. Structure for SIP Message. Examples of SIP Message Exchanges. Potential Problems with SIP. Appendix 11A SIP Use of the Augmented Backus-Naur Form Notations.

12. Interworking Internets and Telephone Networks.
Introduction. Internetworking SS7 and the Internet. SS7 and IP Components. The Integration of the Telephone and Internet Service Providers. The IP/SS7 Internetworking Model (RFC 2719). Layered Protocols for SS7 and IP Signaling. H.323 and SS7. SIP and SS7. H.323 and SIP. SIP and IN.

APPENDIX A: IP Call Processing and QOS.
APPENDIX B: ISDN and SS7.
APPENDIX C: INs and AINs.
APPENDIX D: RFC 822.
APPENDIX E: RFC 2234.
GLOSSARY.
REFERENCES.
INDEX.
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Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

This book is one in a series of books called, "Advanced Communications Technologies." As the name of the book implies, the focus is on Internet telephony and protocols that support call processing. The book is an expansion of Advanced Features of the Internet, also part of this series.

The book has been written as a follow-up to the book in this series titled Voice Over IP (VOIP).

While the call processing protocols described in this book are oriented toward telephone calls, they also support calls associated with data and video connections. Examples of their support for all these applications are provided in several chapters.

I hope you find this book a valuable addition to your library.

Notes to the Reader

There are four major IP-based Call Processing Protocols being deployed in the industry: H.323, SIP, MGCP, and Megaco. The chapters in this book that deal with other subjects are included because they deal with and support these four protocols.

There are many examples of protocol flows in this book that illustrate how the call processing messages are transported between the call processing nodes. I have prepared some of them, and others are sourced from the Internet RFCs, IETF working papers, and the ISO/ITU-T Recommendations.

These documents use different notations and figures to illustrate the flows. For continuity and to aid your study of these flows, I have modified some of them so that all are similar.

However, in some instances, I left the flows as they are described in the original specification if my potential alteration would have changed the interpretation ofthespecification in question. For example, some of the authors of the specifications use one "event" to show a message flow though multiple nodes; others describe an event for each instance of the flow at each node. I kept these practices intact; in the event you decide to study the actual specification along with the book, you will find both are consistent.

So, if you do detect some minor differences in my presentations of these important flows, they are there for this reason. Overall, you will find they are quite similar.

Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2001

    comprehensive tutorial for VoIP ...

    Very good for network engineers who feel confused with all these VoIp protocols. But, appendix covering 2 RFCs are not necessary. We buy books because we have difficulties understaning RFC, don't we ?

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