Interpersonal Idiom in Shakespeare, Donne and Early Modern Culture: A Prehistory of the Self

Interpersonal Idiom in Shakespeare, Donne and Early Modern Culture: A Prehistory of the Self

by Nancy Selleck
     
 

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Sixteenth-century English speakers understood identity in radically different terms than ours, Attending to the interpersonally inflected tropes and paradigms of humoratism, visual perception, and sexual constancy. The Interpersonal Ichom elaborates the ways in which early modern usage figures selves as a function of other selves. Nancy Selleck's study challenges the… See more details below

Overview

Sixteenth-century English speakers understood identity in radically different terms than ours, Attending to the interpersonally inflected tropes and paradigms of humoratism, visual perception, and sexual constancy. The Interpersonal Ichom elaborates the ways in which early modern usage figures selves as a function of other selves. Nancy Selleck's study challenges the current critical preoccupation with subjectivity, arguing that Shakespeare. Donne, and other early modern writers often emphatically resist emerging conventions of subjective authority and locate selfhood instead in the experience of others. Analyzing a diverse range of texts - from treatises on medicine, faculty psychology, and the controversy over women to drama, poetry, and devotionat literature - Selleck's study proposes a new theoretical understanding of identity in early modern culture.

About the Author:
Nancy Selleck is Associate Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Lowell

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Selleck’s well-researched, elegantly written, and theoretically sophisticated argument offers a timely reformulation of the self/other dyad in early modern literature and culture. By insisting on the ways the self is objectified in, for, and by the other, Selleck challenges the notion of autonomous selfhood that, even when under erasure in post-structuralist critique, pervades current usages of the term. This is an exciting thesis — one that has the potential to remap the terrain not only of early modern but also postmodern accounts of the self." - Jonathan Gil Harris, George Washington University.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780230265240
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
05/29/2008
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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