Intersecting Inequalities: Class, Race, Sex and Sexualities / Edition 1

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Overview

For sophomore/junior level courses on race, class and gender taught in Sociology and Women's Studies departments.

This collection of readings includes a mix of classical, contemporary and global sources that discuss “intersecting inequalities”—class, race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity. The book asks a fundamental question: is inequality inevitable?

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131839588
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 6/19/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 6.92 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

INTERSECTING INEQUALITIES

Preface. Making Sense of Intersecting Inequalities.

Chapter One. Is Inequality Inevitable?

Chapter Introduction.

Richard Sennett, “The Seductions of Inequality,” in Respect in a World of Inequality, New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2003: pp. 89-94.

Kingsley David and Wilbert E. Moore, “Some Principles of Stratification,” American Sociological Review, Vol. 10, No. 2, 1944:242-249.

Melvin M. Tumin, “Some Principles of Stratification: A Critical Analysis,” American Sociological Review, Vol. 18, No. 4, 1953: 387-394.

E. Franklin Frazier, “Biracial Organizations,” in Race and Culture Contacts in the Modern World, Boston: Beacon Press (get date) : 269-287.

Juliet Mitchell, “The Position of Women,” in Woman’s Estate, Pantheon Books, 1971: 99-122.

Iris Marion Young, “Structural Difference and Inequality,” in Inclusion and Democracy, Oxford University Press, 2000: 92-99.

Charles Tilly, “Of Essences and Bonds,” in Durable Inequality, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998: 10-15.

Chapter Two. Class.

Chapter Introduction.

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, “Bourgeois and Proletarians,” in The Marx-Engels Reader, Robert Tucker, ed., New York: W.W. Norton, 1972: 335-345.

Max Weber, “Class, Status, Party,” in From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, H. H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills (translators and editors), New York: Oxford University Press, 1946: 180-195.

Thorsten Veblen, “Pecuniary Emulation,” in The Theory of the Leisure Class,” Prometheus Books, 1998:22-34.

Erik Olin Wright, “Foundations of Class Analysis: A Marxist Perspective,” in Reconfigurations of Class and Gender, Janeen Baxter and Mark Western (eds.), Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001: 14-27.

W. Lloyd Warner with Marchia Meeker and Kenneth Eells, “What Social Class Is in America,” in Social Class in America , Harper & Row Publishers, 1960: 3-32.

Peter M. Blau and Otis Dudley Duncan with Andrea Tyree, “Occupational Structure and Historical Trends,” in The American Occupational Structure, New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 1967: 418-431.

Robert Perrucci and Earl Wysong, The New Class Society: Goodbye American Dream?, 2nd ed., Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2003: 10-30.

Lisa A. Keister, “Who Owns What? The Changing Distribution of Wealth,” in Wealth in American: Trends in Wealth Inequality, Cambridge University Press, 2000: 55-66.

Alan Wolfe, “The Middle Class and its Discontents,” in One Nation, After All, New York: Viking, 1998: 5-17.

Teresa A. Sullivan, Elizabeth Warren, Jay Lawrence Westbrook, “The Middle Class in Debt,” in The Fragile Middle Class: Americans in Debt, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000: 238-261.

Edna Bonacich and Richard P. Appelbaum, “The Return of the Sweatshop,” in Behind the Label: Inequality in the Los Angeles Apparel Industry, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000: 1-8.

Rebecca M. Blank, “The Changing Face of Poverty,” in It Takes a Nation: A New Agenda for Fighting Poverty, Sage Publications, 1997: 13-27.

Barbara Reskin, “The Proximate Causes of Employment Discrimination,” Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 29, No. 2, March, 2000: 319-328.

Chapter 3. Race, Ethnicity, and Class

Chapter Introduction.

Melvin L. Oliver and Thomas M. Shapiro, “Wealth and Racial Stratification,” in Smelser et. Al., America Becoming: Racial Trends and their Consequences, Vol. II, Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2001: 222-251.

Douglas S. Massey and Nancy A. Denton, “The Perpetuation of the Underclass,” in American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass, Harvard University Press, 1993: 148-160.

William Julius Wilson, When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996: 137-146.

Roger Waldinger and Michael I. Lichter, “A New Ethnic Order,” in How the Other Half Works: Immigration and the Social Organization of Labor, University of California Press, 2003: 160-170.

Katherine S. Newman, “No Shame in (This) Game,” in No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City, Alfred A. Knopf and Russell Sage, 2000: 86-95.

Michele Lamont, “Whites on Blacks,” “Blacks on Whites,” in The Dignity of Working Men: Morality and the Boundaries of Race, Class and Immigration, Russell Sage and Harvard University Press, 2000: 60-83.

Jill Quadagno, “Another Face of Inequality: Racial and Ethnic Exclusion in the Welfare State, Social Politics, Vol. 7, No. 2, Summer, 2000: 229-237.

Derek Bok and Charles Bowen, “Informing the Debate” in The shape of the river, Princeton University Press, 1998: 256-274.

Nicholas Lemann, “Meritocracy,” in The Big Test: The secret history of the American meritocracy, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000: 115-122.

Chapter 4. Sex, Sexual Identity, and Class

Chapter Introduction.

Cecilia Ridgeway, “Interaction and the Conservation of Gender Inequality: Considering Employment,” in American Sociological Review, 1997, Vol. 62, April: 218-235.

Eleanor Maccoby, “Gender-based Hierarchy,” in The Two Sexes: Growing Up Apart, Coming Together, Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1999: 229-251.

Paula England, “Gender and Access to Money: What do Trends in Earnings and Household Poverty Tell Us?” in Reconfigurations of Class and Gender, Janeen Baxtger and Mark Western (eds.), Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001: 131-153.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, “Maid in L.A.,” in Domestica: Immigrant Workers Cleaning and Caring in the Shadows of Affluence, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2001: 30-37.

Barbara Ehrenreich, “Selling in Minnesota,” in Nickel and Dimed, New York: Metropolitan Books, 2001: 143-169.

Diana Kendall, “Members Only: Organizational Structure and Patterns of Exclusion,” in The Power of Good Deeds, Rowman and Littlefield, 2002: 143-164.

M.V. Lee Badgett and Mary C. King, “Lesbian and Gay Occupational Strategies,” in Homo Economics: Capitalism, Community, and Lesbian and Gay Life, Amy Gluckman and Betsy Reed (eds). New York: Routledge, 1997: 73-86.

Julie Matthaei, “The Sexual Division of Labor, Sexuality, and Lesbian/Gay Liberation,” in Homo Economics, 136-164.

Chapter 5. Citizenship, Capitalism, Globalization, and Class

Chapter Introduction.

Howard Winant, “Racism: From Domination to Hegemony,” in The World is a Ghetto: Race and Democracy Since World War II, Basic Books, 2001: 305-376.

Glenn Firebaugh, Chapter 2 in The New Geography of Global Income Inequality, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003: 15-29.

David S. Landes, “Losers,” in The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some so Poor, New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1998: 491-507.

Loic Wacquant, “Urban Marginality in the Coming Millennium,” Urban Studies, Vol 36, No. 10, 1999: 1639-1647.

Evelyn Nakano Glenn, “Patterns of Domination,” in Unequal Freedom: How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizensship and Labor, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002: 240-264.

Leslie Sklair, “Globalizing Class Theory,” in The Transnational Capitalist Class, Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2001: 10-23.

Pippa Norris, “Digital Divide,” in Digital Divide: Civic Engagement, Information Poverty, and the Internet Worldwide, Cambridge University Press, 2001: 77-92.

Kevin Bales, “New Slavery in the Global Economy,” in Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1999: 12-22.

Chapter 6. What is to be done?

Chapter Introduction.

Herbert J. Gans, “Joblessness and Antipoverty Policy in the Twenty-first Century,” in The War Against the Poor, BasicBooks, 1995: 135-147.

Jeff Faux, “Public Investment for a Twenty-First Century Economy,” in Back to Shared Prosperity, Ray Marshall (ed.), M.E. Sharpe, 2000: 211-218.

Amartya Sen, “Democracy as a Universal Value,” Journal of Democracy, Vol 10, 1999: 3-17.

Philip Green, “Equality and Democracy,” in Equality and Democracy, New York: The New Press, 1998: 171-184.

Immanuel Wallerstein, “ A Substantially Rational World, Or can Paradise be Regained?” in Utopistics, New York: The New Press, 1998: 65-90.

Conclusion. Sonia Hanson, Peter Kivisto and Beth Hartung, “Confronting Intersecting Inequalities.”

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