Intimate History of Humanity

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Overview

A provocative work that explores the evolution of emotions and personal relationships through diverse cultures and time. "An intellectually dazzling view of our past and future."—Time magazine

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Overview

A provocative work that explores the evolution of emotions and personal relationships through diverse cultures and time. "An intellectually dazzling view of our past and future."—Time magazine

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A readable and thoughtful work first published in Great Britain in 1994 by Sinclair-Stevenson, an imprint of Reed Consumer Books, Ltd. Historian Zeldin Oxford U. conveys the broad scope of his reflections in chapters with such intriguing titles as: How humans have repeatedly lost hope, and how new encounters, and a new pair of spectacles revive them; How men and women have slowly learned to have interesting conversations; How some people have acquired an immunity to loneliness; Why there has been more progress in cooking than in sex; and How people have freed themselves from fear by finding new fears. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060926915
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/28/1995
  • Series: Harper Perennial
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 979,417
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 1.11 (d)

Table of Contents

1 How humans have repeatedly lost hope, and how new encounters, and a new pair of spectacles, revive them 1
2 How men and women have slowly learned to have interesting conversations 22
3 How people searching for their roots are only beginning to look far and deep enough 43
4 How some people have acquired an immunity to loneliness 55
5 How new forms of love have been invented 72
6 Why there has been more progress in cooking than in sex 86
7 How the desire that men feel for women, and for other men, has altered through the centuries 108
8 How respect has become more desirable than power 131
9 How those who want neither to give orders nor to receive them can become intermediaries 147
10 How people have freed themselves from fear by finding new fears 166
11 How curiosity has become the key to freedom 183
12 Why it has become increasingly difficult to destroy one's enemies 204
13 How the art of escaping from one's troubles has developed, but not the art of knowing where to escape to 221
14 Why compassion has flowered even in stony ground 236
15 Why toleration has never been enough 256
16 Why even the privileged are often somewhat gloomy about life, even when they can have anything the consumer society offers, and even after sexual liberation 274
17 How travellers are becoming the largest nation in the world, and how they have learned not to see only what they are looking for 299
18 Why friendship between men and women has been so fragile 314
19 How even astrologers resist their destiny 335
20 Why people have not been able to find the time to lead several lives 346
21 Why fathers and their children are changing their minds about what they want from each other 358
22 Why the crisis in the family is only one stage in the evolution of generosity 375
23 How people choose a way of life, and how it does not wholly satisfy them 396
24 How humans become hospitable to each other 426
25 What becomes possible when soul-mates meet 465
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2004

    Intimate History of Humanity

    probably The most sensitive account of Humanity....very educational '(social)-history-wise', i would think it is for the rather esoteric!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2004

    Intimate History of Humanity

    THE GREATEST MOST SENSETIVE ACCOUNT EVER OF HUMANS.....PROBABLY A CUT ABOVE HIS 'PEERS'....ZELDIN'S BRAINS MUST BE CHERRISHED AS MOST PRECIOUS ASSET TO HUMANITY!

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