×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Intimate Violence: Attacks Upon Psychic Interiority
     

Intimate Violence: Attacks Upon Psychic Interiority

by Joseph Scalia
 

See All Formats & Editions

Traditional analyses of domestic battery often point to the batterer's need for power and control to explain patterns of violent behavior. Offering a nonjudgmental and compassionate view of the interior life of the batterer, Intimate Violence moves beyond this explanation and transforms our understanding of the psychic origins of abuse. The book is divided

Overview

Traditional analyses of domestic battery often point to the batterer's need for power and control to explain patterns of violent behavior. Offering a nonjudgmental and compassionate view of the interior life of the batterer, Intimate Violence moves beyond this explanation and transforms our understanding of the psychic origins of abuse. The book is divided into three main sections. The first assesses psychoanalytic understanding of the inner mechanisms of the batterer's violent behavior toward close family members, pointing to disruptions in the abuser's "narcissistic equilibrium." The second section looks more broadly at the ideas of "batterer" and "victim," and the ways these categories—and the social stigma and support accorded respectively—may impede healing and resolution. The third section addresses various treatment methods that promise permanent changes in batterers' behavior.

Intimate Violence also deals frankly with the dynamics of the therapist/client relationship in battery cases, particularly transference and countertransference. How do therapists deal with feelings of revulsion for the batterer's behavior, or for the batterer him- or herself? How do they resist the very human urge within themselves to punish their clients? Scalia persuasively argues that these issues subtly undermine counseling, causing resistance to develop within both parties, and that a new approach to therapy is needed. His analysis suggests that "emotional communication" in the context of prolonged and deep psychoanalysis enables patient and practitioner alike to transcend cycles of recrimination and defensiveness.

Editorial Reviews

Robert J. Marshall
In a scholarly and clinically astute work Joseph Scalia has integrated a wide range of clinical and developmental theories that demythologizes and humanizes a psychoanalytic pariah, the batterer. In a clearly written style Scalia provides firm and valuable guidelines for treatment laced with substantial clinical vignettes. Intimate Violence is essential reading for every clinician who works with batterers and their victims."

Journal of Psychohistory - Neil Wilson
[Scalia's] approach is an eye-opener. The author has what seems the rare ability to get beyond the revulsion and disgust these patients would arouse in most therapists. He is able to reach patients at a primitive, emotional level and can effectively combat the powerful impulse to back away. Reading the author's clinical material enables one to see the humanity that even batterers possess.

Criminal Justice Review
Joseph Scalia's work Intimate Violence: Attacks Upon Psychic Interiority offers an in-depth exploration of the psychological complexity behind domestic violence... Scalia's work presents an important and interesting arguement.

Journal of Psychohistory
[Scalia's] approach is an eye-opener. The author has what seems the rare ability to get beyond the revulsion and disgust these patients would arouse in most therapists. He is able to reach patients at a primitive, emotional level and can effectively combat the powerful impulse to back away. Reading the author's clinical material enables one to see the humanity that even batterers possess.

— Neil Wilson

Psychoanalyst Scalia explores the psychic origins of abuse, assessing the inner mechanisms of the batterer's violent behavior toward family members. He suggests that the traditional analysis of domestic violence, which points up the abuser's need for power and control, is "necessary but insufficient" and may actually set up a "batterer versus victim" mentality that impedes healing and resolution. Scalia discusses why batterers act the way they do; analyzes society's general ideas about victims and abuse, suggesting alternative views; and addresses treatment considerations for therapists working with violent men. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231119849
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
02/27/2002
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)
Lexile:
1450L (what's this?)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are Saying About This

James S. Grotstein
This work is a watershed....a must, not only for all mental health workers but also for society at large.

Christopher Bollas
Scalia's book is the most comprehensive psychoanalytical study of domestic violence to date, and, it will prove to be essential reading to anyone working in this area. His case studies are not simply informative and clinically helpful; they are also unforgettable. He arrives at new and convincing theoretical understandings of violent men. He has, in other words, found creative understandings of otherwise off-putting individuals: a remarkable fact in what so often seems a rather bleak part of the world of mental health.

Cindy Garthwait
Those seeking to understand intimate violence and who are willing to critically reexamine the psychic interior of the batterer will be rewarded with a fresh blending of theory building and treatment guidelines.

Meet the Author

Joseph Scalia is a psychotherapist who has written articles for The Journal of Interpersonal Violence and Modern Psychoanalyst.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews