Into the Forest

( 35 )

Overview

Set in the near-future, Into the Forest is a powerfully imagined novel that focuses on the relationship between two teenage sisters living alone in their Northern California forest home.

Over 30 miles from the nearest town, and several miles away from their nearest neighbor, Nell and Eva struggle to survive as society begins to decay and collapse around them. No single event precedes society's fall. There is talk of a war overseas and upheaval in Congress, but it still comes as ...

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Into the Forest

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Overview

Set in the near-future, Into the Forest is a powerfully imagined novel that focuses on the relationship between two teenage sisters living alone in their Northern California forest home.

Over 30 miles from the nearest town, and several miles away from their nearest neighbor, Nell and Eva struggle to survive as society begins to decay and collapse around them. No single event precedes society's fall. There is talk of a war overseas and upheaval in Congress, but it still comes as a shock when the electricity runs out and gas is nowhere to be found. The sisters consume the resources left in the house, waiting for the power to return. Their arrival into adulthood, however, forces them to reexamine their place in the world and their relationship to the land and each other.

Reminiscent of Margaret Atwood's A Handmaid's Tale, Into the Forest is a mesmerizing and thought-provoking novel of hope and despair set in a frighteningly plausible near-future America.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
November 1997

It is a future that is frighteningly palpable. A distant war rages overseas. The ordinary conveniences of everyday life — food, transportation, electricity — can no longer be taken for granted. Deadly diseases have mutated and become stronger. In this milieu, two young girls on the cusp of womanhood discover themselves and each other. Jean Hegland's first novel, Into the Forest, eloquently tells their story and, in doing so, effortlessly captures the beauty of humanity.

Eva, 18, and Nell, 17, are sisters who live in a house situated in the middle of acres of California forest. Eva is an extremely dedicated ballerina. Her inexorable ardor for dance is matched only by her sister's thirst for knowledge. Eva wanted to audition for the San Francisco Ballet; now, without electricity, she dances to the unyielding, emotionless beat of the metronome. Nell wanted to attend Harvard; now she spends her days studying the encyclopedia. Both girls were home-schooled, so their lives have been slightly sheltered — but never as sheltered as when their parents died, leaving them to survive by their wits in a truly uncertain world.

Is this a tale about two girls surviving in an unthinkable postapocalyptic future, a sort of Pride and Prejudice meets 1984? Thankfully, no. Hegland leaves the details of the world's breakdown quite vague. There is a dire shortage of natural resources, there is disease, war...or, as Hegland says, "We have so many problems today that if the apocalypse does come, I think it will be a combination of things."Butthat is not what this story is about. The world that Hegland creates is an environment, a catalyst for the much more profoundly moving story of her protagonists.

The story is told by Nell in the first person and moves between the present and various past moments in the girls' lives. As you read Hegland's wonderful prose, especially her lush descriptions and skillful metaphors, you will be introduced to characters that have the breath of life. The girls' father has a kind of hopeful cynicism. The mother is quiet, introspective, sometimes seeming not to care, though she always does. Eva's and Nell's thoughts and words flow with the logic and feeling of actual human beings.

Hegland's novel explores both self-discovery and the discovery of others. One of the simplest (yet, paradoxically, most complex) goals a writer can achieve is to tell a story about life — about the value, the wonder, the diversity of life. With Into the Forest, Jean Hegland goes beyond this goal, presenting a tale whose characters come alive. You believe in the lives she creates, and you might even recognize yourself.

From the Publisher
Praise for Jean Hegland's Into the Forest

"[A] beautifully written and often profoundly moving novel."
—San Francisco Chronicle

"A work of extraordinary power, insight and lyricism, Into the Forest is both an urgent warning and a passionate celebration of life and love."
—Riane Eisler, author of The Chalice and the Blade

*"From the first page, the sense of crisis and the lucid, honest voice of the...narrator pull the reader in....A truly admirable addition to a genre defined by the very high standards of George Orwell's 1984."
—Publishers Weekly,starred review

"Beautifully written."
—Kirkus Reviews

"This beautifully written story captures the essential nature of the sister bond: the fierce struggle to be true to one's own self, only to learn that true strength comes from what they are able to share together."
—Carol Saline, co-author of Sisters

"Jean Hegland's sense of character is firm, warm, and wise....[A] fine first novel."
—John Keeble, author of Yellowfish

Library Journal
Young women in peril at the end of the world is given a different spin in Hegland's (Windfalls) story of Nell and Eva, sisters eking out a life in living in a remote forested area of Northern California in the wake of societal collapse. VERDICT This haunting tale of survival is dark and heartwrenching but narrated beautifully and filled with thought-provoking ideas.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Hegland's powerfully imagined first novel will make readers thankful for telephones and CD players while it underscores the vulnerability of lives dependent on technology. The tale is set in the near future: electricity has failed, mail delivery has stopped and looting and violence have destroyed civil order. In Northern California, 32 miles from the closest town, two orphaned teenage sisters ration a dwindling supply of tea bags and infested cornmeal. They remember their mother's warnings about the nearby forest, but as the crisis deepens, bears and wild pigs start to seem less dangerous than humans. From the first page, the sense of crisis and the lucid, honest voice of the 17-year-old narrator pull the reader in, and the fight for survival adds an urgent edge to her coming-of-age story. Flashbacks smartly create a portrait of the lost family: an iconoclastic father, artistic mother and two independent daughters. The plot draws readers along at the same time that the details and vivid writing encourage rereading. Eating a hot dog starts with "the pillowy give of the bun," and the winter rains are "great silver needles stitching the dull sky to the sodden earth." If sometimes the lyricism goes a little too far, this is still a truly admirable addition to a genre defined by the very high standards of George Orwell's 1984 and Russell Hoban's Ridley Walker. (July)
Library Journal
This story of grit pits two sisters against the natural elements and dwindling supplies in the aftermath of a holocaust, whose origin is never fully explained. Nell, the narrator; her sister, Eva; and their parents live in seclusion near Redwood, California. Eva concentrates on ballet dancing, Nell on tracking through the forest, working on projects with her dad, and contemplating the essay she will write to apply to Harvard. Before long numerous signs of disintegration start to appear. Eva and Nell's mother dies of cancer, leaving the rest of the family to endure without her unflinching good humor and steadfastness. First novelist Hegland writes simply and directly, which allows her to convey strong emotions. She has the ability to make the giant redwood trees seem palpable, to allow readers to breathe in the smell of the rich humus on the floor of the forest. Highly recommended for public libraries.Lisa S. Nussbaum, Euclid P.L., Ohio
Kirkus Reviews
Brisk, feminist, contemplative first novel about the end of contemporary civilization and the survival of two sisters. Hegland is vague about civilization's downfall. She places a wife, a husband, and their two daughters, Eva and Nell, on 50 acres of second-growth redwood forest in northern California—the idea seeming to be that since the location is remote to begin with, news of the outside world would filter in slowly. There's a war somewhere, and ever more virulent strains of viruses rage through the population; then, suddenly, there's no more food available in stores, no more gasoline, no more television. The mother dies; the father pushes his dreamy daughters to learn such humble skills as gardening and canning. In the best scene, the father's chain saw kicks back and cuts him, and his daughters are helpless, unable to do more than watch as he bleeds to death. They bury him where he lies. Slowly, because the alternative is starvation, Nell learns the wisdom of the forest: killing a wild sow with a rifle she barely knows how to fire, using herbs for medicines and tea, gathering acorns to pound into flour. A boy comes to take Nell away, but she cannot leave Eva; though sisters by birth, Hegland turns the girls into lovers—and ideologically pure lovers, at that. Mystically, they both produce milk to nurse Eva's son, the product of a rape by a passing thug. Fearful of more such violence, the sisters burn down their father's house and take up housekeeping in a mammoth redwood stump. They've learned nature's lessons and, purified, are prepared for humankind's great destiny: to live in the woods like animals. A little apocalypse goes a long way. Beautifully written,however, and Hegland's knowledge of organic gardening, fruit drying, etc., is impeccably authentic.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553379617
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/28/1998
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 163,496
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 8.24 (h) x 0.58 (d)

Meet the Author

Jean Hegland is the author of The Life Within: Celebration of a Pregnancy.  She lives with her husband and three children in northern California on fifty-five acres of second-growth forest.  She is at work on her next novel, which explores the issues of motherhood.

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Read an Excerpt

It's strange, writing these first words, like leaning down into the musty stillness of a well and seeing my face peer up from the water—so small and from such an unfamiliar angle I'm startled to realize the reflection is my own.  After all this time a pen feels stiff and awkward in my hand.  And I have to admit that this notebook, with its wilderness of blank pages, seems almost more threat than gift—for what can I write here that it will not hurt to remember?

You could write about now, Eva said, about this time. This morning I was so certain I would use this notebook for studying that I had to work to keep from scoffing at her suggestion.  But now I see she may be right.  Every subject I think of—from economics to meteorology, from anatomy to geography to history—seems to circle around on itself, to lead me unavoidably back to now, to here, today.

Today is Christmas Day.  I can't avoid that.  We've crossed the days off the calendar much too conscientiously to be wrong about the date, however much we might wish we were.  Today is Christmas Day, and Christmas Day is one more day to live through, one more day to be endured so that someday soon this time will be behind us.

By next Christmas this will all be over, and my sister and I will have regained the lives we are meant to live.  The electricity will be back, the phones will work.  Planes will fly above our clearing once again.  In town there will be food in the stores and gas at the service stations.  Long before next Christmas we will have indulged in everything we now lack and crave—soap and shampoo, toilet paper and milk, fresh fruit and meat.  My computer will be running, Eva's CD player will be working.  We'll be listening to the radio, reading the newspaper, using the Internet.  Banks and schools and libraries will have reopened, and Eva and I will have left this house where we now live like shipwrecked orphans.  She will be dancing with the corps of the San Francisco Ballet, I'll have finished my first semester at Harvard, and this wet, dark day the calendar has insisted we call Christmas will be long, long over.

"Merry semi-pagan, slightly literary, and very commercial Christmas," our father would always announce on Christmas morning, when, long before the midwinter dawn, Eva and I would team up in the hall outside our parents' bedroom.  Jittery with excitement, we would plead with them to get up, to come downstairs, to hurry, while they yawned, insisted on donning bathrobes, on washing their faces and brushing their teeth, even—if our father was being particularly infuriating—on making coffee.

After the clutter and laughter of present-opening came the midday dinner we used to take for granted, phone calls from distant relatives, Handel's Messiah issuing triumphantly from the CD player.  At some point during the afternoon the four of us would take a walk down the dirt road that ends at our clearing.  The brisk air and green forest would clear our senses and our palates, and by the time we reached the bridge and were ready to turn back, our father would have inevitably announced, "This is the real Christmas present, by god—peace and quiet and clean air.  No neighbors for four miles, and no town for thirty-two.  Thank Buddha, Shiva, Jehovah, and the California Department of Forestry we live at the end of the road!"

Later, after night had fallen and the house was dark except for the glow of bulbs on the Christmas tree, Mother would light the candles of the nativity carousel, and we would spend a quiet moment standing together before it, watching the shepherds, wise men, and angels circle around the little holy family.

"Yep," our father would say, before we all wandered off to nibble at the turkey carcass and cut slivers off the cold plum pudding, "that's the story.  Could be better, could be worse.  But at least there's a baby at the center of it."

This Christmas there's none of that.

There are no strings of lights, no Christmas cards.  There are no piles of presents, no long-distance phone calls from great-aunts and second cousins, no Christmas carols. There is no turkey, no plum pudding, no stroll to the bridge with our parents, no Messiah. This year Christmas is nothing but another white square on a calendar that is almost out of dates, an extra cup of tea, a few moments of candlelight, and, for each of us, a single gift.

Why do we bother?

Three years ago—when I was fourteen and Eva fifteen—I asked that same question one rainy night a week before Christmas.  Father was grumbling over the number of cards he still had to write, and Mother was hidden in her workroom with her growling sewing machine, emerging periodically to take another batch of cookies from the oven and prod me into washing the mixing bowls.

"Nell, I need those dishes done so I can start the pudding before I go to bed," she said as she closed the oven door on the final sheet of cookies.

"Okay," I muttered, turning the next page of the book in which I was immersed.

"Tonight, Nell," she said.

"Why are we doing this?" I demanded, looking up from my book in irritation.

"Because they're dirty," she answered, pausing to hand me a warm gingersnap before she swept back to the mysteries of her sewing.

"Not the dishes," I grumbled.

"Then what, Pumpkin?" asked my father as he licked an  envelope and emphatically crossed another name off his list.

"Christmas.  All this mess and fuss and we aren't even really Christians."

"Goddamn right we aren't," said our father, laying down his pen, bounding up from the table by the front window, already warming to the energy of his own talk.

"We're not Christians, we're capitalists," he said. "Everybody in this whangdanged country is a capitalist, whether he likes it or not.  Everyone in this country is one of the world's most voracious consumers, using resources at a rate twenty times greater than that of anyone else on this poor earth.  And Christmas is our golden opportunity to pick up the pace."

When he saw I was turning back to my book, he added, "Why are we doing Christmas?  Beats me.  Tell you what—let's quit.  Throw in the towel.  I'll drive into town tomorrow and return the gifts. We'll give the cookies to the chickens and write all our friends and relations and explain we've given up Christmas for Lent.  It's a shame to waste my vacation, though," he continued in mock sadness.

"I know." He snapped his fingers and ducked as though an idea had just struck him on the back of the head.  "We'll replace the beams under the utility room.  Forget those dishes, Nell, and find me the jack."

I glared at him, hating him for half a second for the effortless way he deflected my barbs and bad temper.  I huffed into the kitchen, grabbed a handful of cookies, and wandered upstairs to hide in my bedroom with my book.

Later I could hear him in the kitchen, washing the dishes I had ignored and singing at the top of his voice,

"We three kings of oil and tar,
tried to smoke a rubber cigar.
It was loaded, and it exploded,
higher than yonder star."

The next year even I wouldn't have dared to question Christmas. Mother was sick, and we all clung to everything that was bright and sweet and warm, as though we thought if we ignored the shadows, they would vanish into the brilliance of hope.  But the following spring the cancer took her anyway, and last Christmas my sister and I did our best to bake and wrap and sing in a frantic effort to convince our father—and ourselves—that we could be happy without her.

I thought we were miserable last Christmas.  I thought we were miserable because our mother was dead and our father had grown distant and silent.  But there were lights on the tree and a turkey in the oven.  Eva was Clara in the Redwood Ballet's performance of The Nutcracker, and I had just received the results of my Scholastic Aptitude Tests, which were good enough—if I did okay on the College Board Achievement Tests—to justify the letter I was composing to the Harvard Admissions Committee.

But this year all that is either gone or in abeyance.  This year Eva and I celebrate only because it's less painful to admit that today is Christmas than to pretend it isn't.

It's hard to come up with a present for someone when there is no store in which to buy it, when there is little privacy in which to make it, when everything you own, every bean and grain of rice, each spoon and pen and paper clip, is also owned by the person to whom you want to give a gift.

I gave Eva a pair of her own toe shoes.  Two weeks ago I snuck the least battered pair from the closet in her studio and renovated them as best I could, working on them in secret while she was practicing.  With the last drops of our mother's spot remover, I cleaned the tattered satin.  I restitched the leather soles with monofilament from our father's tackle box.  I soaked the mashed toe boxes in a mixture of water and wood glue, did my best to reshape them, hid them behind the stove to dry, and then soaked and shaped and dried them again and again.  Finally I darned the worn satin at the tips of the toes so that she could get a few more hours of use from them by first dancing on the web of stitches I had sewn.

She gasped when she opened the box and saw them.

"I don't know if they're any good," I said.  "They're probably way too soft.  I had no idea what I was doing."

But while I was still protesting, she flung her arms around me. We clung together for a long second and then we both leapt back. These days our bodies carry our sorrows as though they were bowls brimming with water.  We must always be careful; the slightest jolt or unexpected shift and the water will spill and spill and spill.

Eva's gift to me was this notebook.

"It's not a computer," she said, as I lifted it from its wrinkled wrapping paper, recycled from some birthday long ago and not yet sacrificed as fire-starter.  "But it's all blank, every page."

"Blank paper!" I marveled.  "Where on earth did you get it?"

"I found it behind my dresser.  It must have fallen back there years ago.  I thought you could use it to write about this time.  For our grandchildren or something."

Right now, grandchildren seem less likely than aliens from Mars, and when  I first lifted the stained cardboard cover and flipped through these pages,  slightly musty, and blank except for their scaffolding of lines, I have to admit  I was thinking more about studying for the Achievement Tests than about  chronicling this time.  And yet it feels good to write.  I miss the quick click  of my computer keys and the glow of the screen, but tonight this pen feels like  Plaza wine in my hand, and already the lines that lead these words down the  page seem more like the warp of our mother's loom and less like the bars I had  first imagined them to be.  Already I see how much there is to say.

  
  

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Foreword

1) Into The Forest seems to convey that the stripped-down life of a hunter-gatherer would be better for us as a species. What Nell and Eva do is clearly right for them. Would it be right for people in general? For women? Is it a tenable ideal for any but the very young, very fit, and very adaptable?

2) Does the lifestyle the sisters adopt in Into The Forest imply or require an abandonment of the whole notion of "advanced civilization?"

3) The Women's Review of Books said of Into The Forest: "Cultural trauma forces the heroines to inhabit and regard their world in radical new ways, [as] recipients of wisdom they did not want but are better off for having." Do you agree with this? Why or why not?

4) How would you answer the question raised by this novel and posed in The Sunday Oregonian: "Where are we heading, and do we know how to survive with our humanity intact if we continue in this direction?"

5) Before razing the house in which they had spent their entire lives and turning to the forest for all their necessities, Nell chooses three books to take with her: Native Plants of Northern California for Eva since it may have already saved her life; a book of stories of those who had lived in the forest for Burl; and the encyclopedia's index for herself. In choosing the index she says, "I could not save all the stories, could not hope to preserve all the information—that was too vast, too disparate, perhaps even too dangerous. But I could take the encyclopedia's index, could try to keep that master list of all that had once been made or told or understood." If you could take only oneitem from your current existence into the future, and that one item was a book, what would you choose and why? Why do you think that Hegland would choose to describe the retaining of information as "too dangerous?"

6) Some of the most poignant moments of the story are found in minor details. Reading Into The Forest will forever change the way you think about a teabag, a scrap of paper, a metronome, an acorn, or a chocolate kiss candy. It will forever change your thinking about dreams and days of the week. Which of these affected you most? What other examples struck your sensibilities?

7) Above all, Into The Forest is a story about the boundaries and possibilities of sisterhood. Do you feel a comparable story could have been written about a relationship between a brother and sister or two brothers?

8) What kind of childhood do you think Eva's baby will have? If technology and society were to return to advanced states, how might the child adapt to leaving the forest?

9) If your "technologically-based" lifestyle were to evolve into a "nature-based" lifestyle, how do you think you would survive? What would you enjoy? What conveniences would you most miss?

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Interviews & Essays

Before the live bn.com chat, Jean Hegland agreed to answer some of our questions.

Q:  Say Into the Forest is made into a film. Who would play Nell and Eva?

A:  That's a good question. However, it's difficult because between my family and my writing, I don't see a lot of movies. Someone suggested Winona Ryder as Nell, which I thought was a good choice.

Q:  Do you relate more strongly to Eva or Nell?

A:  Well, the book is written in the first person by Nell...so I guess I would say Nell. She is more like me, more cerebral, more verbal. Eva is more physical. I remember times while I was writing the book that I would look into the mirror and be surprised -- like I saw someone else -- surprised that I saw myself and not Nell.

Q:  Was there a particular moment or moments in your life that inspired you to be a writer?

A:  I can't remember a time that I did not want to be a writer, but I remember discovering Steinbeck when I was ten. I also had a professor in college who taught rhetoric and composition. That was a very good class, because it taught you how to really break down structure, really take things apart and look at them.

Q:  What kind of music do you like?

A:  The music of my generation -- the Beatles, the Stones. I like classical music...Bach.

Q:  The character of Eva and Nell's father seemed to have a kind of hopeful cynicism. Some people are hopeful, some are cynics; you cleverly merged the two. Could you elaborate?

A:  I don't think you can be cynical without being hopeful.

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Reading Group Guide

1) Into The Forest seems to convey that the stripped-down life of a hunter-gatherer would be better for us as a species. What Nell and Eva do is clearly right for them. Would it be right for people in general? For women? Is it a tenable ideal for any but the very young, very fit, and very adaptable?

2) Does the lifestyle the sisters adopt in Into The Forest imply or require an abandonment of the whole notion of "advanced civilization?"

3) The Women's Review of Books said of Into The Forest: "Cultural trauma forces the heroines to inhabit and regard their world in radical new ways, [as] recipients of wisdom they did not want but are better off for having." Do you agree with this? Why or why not?

4) How would you answer the question raised by this novel and posed in The Sunday Oregonian: "Where are we heading, and do we know how to survive with our humanity intact if we continue in this direction?"

5) Before razing the house in which they had spent their entire lives and turning to the forest for all their necessities, Nell chooses three books to take with her: Native Plants of Northern California for Eva since it may have already saved her life; a book of stories of those who had lived in the forest for Burl; and the encyclopedia's index for herself. In choosing the index she says, "I could not save all the stories, could not hope to preserve all the information—that was too vast, too disparate, perhaps even too dangerous. But I could take the encyclopedia's index, could try to keep that master list of all that had once been made or told or understood." If you could take only one item from your current existence into the future, and that one item was a book, what would you choose and why? Why do you think that Hegland would choose to describe the retaining of information as "too dangerous?"

6) Some of the most poignant moments of the story are found in minor details. Reading Into The Forest will forever change the way you think about a teabag, a scrap of paper, a metronome, an acorn, or a chocolate kiss candy. It will forever change your thinking about dreams and days of the week. Which of these affected you most? What other examples struck your sensibilities?

7) Above all, Into The Forest is a story about the boundaries and possibilities of sisterhood. Do you feel a comparable story could have been written about a relationship between a brother and sister or two brothers?

8) What kind of childhood do you think Eva's baby will have? If technology and society were to return to advanced states, how might the child adapt to leaving the forest?

9) If your "technologically-based" lifestyle were to evolve into a "nature-based" lifestyle, how do you think you would survive? What would you enjoy? What conveniences would you most miss?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 35 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    Not good.

    I have read alot of books, and even though I am not a young adult I read alot of YA books. Adult books tend to get a little raunchy at times so i like to get away from that sometimes. This book was a huge dissapointment to me, the idea behind the book sounded great and most of the reviews were positive but i would have to say this was the worst book I have ever read. It wasnt because of the incest or the spontanious milk production that did it in for me, it was the shear lack of any action or really any substance at all. About half way through I realized that it wasn't going to pick up. I found myself skimming through the parts of her childhood memories to get back to present day hoping something would happen but it never did. The ending was a little better than the rest of the book but thats really not saying much at all. Do yourself a favor and save your money and time for a decent book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Better Take on the Apocalypse

    In the wake of all this 2012 nonsense, this post-apocalyptic book about two sisters in the midst of society's fall is a relief. The realistic way in which the world slowly deteriorates is interesting and believable. The author is an amazing writer and the story is filled with interesting facts about everything from plants to ballet.

    The only thing that was a disappointment in the story was the sisters' incestuous relationship and the protagonist's sudden ability to produce milk. The overall novel was surprisingly realistic and these issues seemed to push it towards a more unbelievable event. The book would have survived without the girls' relationship and their survival was miracle enough that the breast-feeding was overkill and unnecessary.

    Overall, I recommend everyone to read this book, especially the first three-quarters, just to experience the idea of a slowly decaying society and the author's amazing talent with words.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2014

    &diamond

    Skills

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2014

    웯 ♦ ๞

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2014

    Cloudmoon

    Look at post number 5. The one that says Forestclan.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2014

    &infin &phone


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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    &diamond

    &#diamond

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    Gh

    Vb

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    =|= Forestclan - All =|=

    =|= Please go to 'light tree' Result one to Read what I posted. The same Rules and Map are here as well. The only Diffrence is We Moved here. Thank you! &hearts &iota&epsilon&alpha<_>fs&tau&alpha<_>r &hearts =|=

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2012

    Great

    Loved this book. Haunting. Read it years ago and still remember it vividly.

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  • Posted April 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Extreme self-sufficiency

    The book at first remeinded me a little bit of The Road by Cormac McCarthy. Self-sufficiency and family love do prevail, but what does the future hold? I had a lot of questions in my mind after I finished the book.

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  • Posted July 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A great read

    Couldn't put it down.

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  • Posted April 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A debut novel and already a masterwork.

    At first sight you could call this a SF novel with the classical ingredients. Something happened: a nuclear war? an accident with a biological weapon? Anyway it seems that public live has ceased to exist. There is no electricity, no TV or radio and everyone seems to have gone.

    Two young sisters, who lost their parents, live in a cottage deep in the woods of North-California. As a result of what happened they're cut off completely until one day a young man comes to their house and he stays for a while. After he's gone, the two sisters gradually change into a more 'primitive' way of life with a different perception (more elaborated as time goes by) of their surroundings. (To some degree, it reminds me of the novel 'Lord of the Flies' by William Golding).

    But when you think it over, you could say it's a parable about growing up. The arrival of the young man drives them out of the 'Paradise' of their childhood and this starts the process of growing up. They don't turn into 'primitive' humans, they only lose their innocence. They become more mature and finally venture out of their cottage where they used to live for so long.

    I wouldn't be surprised if there were other interpretations. It's a characteristic of masterworks to be interpreted in different ways.

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  • Posted February 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Good book except for the incest

    The concept had potential...two teenage sisters left to fend for themselves in the forest far from town after the collapse of society. The character development was up to par and the book was flowing smoothly, until the sisters began an incestuous sexual relationship with each other. I put the book down in disappointed disgust.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2005

    Well written but downer ending.

    I found this book compelling and hard to put down, but if you like postapocalyptic fiction that ends on an upnote, e.g. '28 Days' (the movie) or 'The Stand', this is not your cup of tea. Without giving much away I can only say that at the end the sisters give in to barbarism and turn their backs on every vestige of the world that was, every hope they had.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2004

    A Realistic, Splendid Book

    Into the Forest is a book that makes you pause for thought. Jean Hegland captures perfectly how a person might feel if this event really happened. It isn't something that would occur overnight, and nor does she portray that, or go into details that would detract from the focus of her book. She gently unfolds the story of two sisters, Nell and Eva, who, after their parents die, try their best, through routine and daily habit, to continue their lives in the US until things return to normal. We never know quite what has happened except it is a massive collapse of society, countrywide. Contact with the two men who come briefly into their lives test their relationship, but in the end bring them closer together. Jean Hegland describes Nell's experiences with an exquisite, refreshing quality, quite possibly touching on the truth of most first encounters than is normally written. Being a perceptive writer, she has put thought behind each word. Her every sentence is purposeful, lyrical, and sometimes hauntingly beautiful. Layer by layer, she peels away the fripperies of modern life and, through her characters, takes us back to the basics of existence by going Into the Forest. I thoroughly enjoyed this exceptional book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2004

    A debut novel and already a masterpiece !

    At first sight you could call this a SF novel with the classical ingredients. Something happened: a nuclear war? an accident with a biological weapon? Anyway it seems that public live has ceased to exist. There is no electricity, no TV or radio and everyone seems to have gone. Two young sisters, who lost their parents, live in a cottage deep in the woods of North-California. As a result of what happened they're cut off completely until one day a young man comes to their house and he stays for a while. After he's gone, the two sisters gradually change into a more 'primitive' way of life with a different perception (more elaborated as time goes by) of their surroundings. (To some degree, it reminds me of the novel 'Lord of the Flies' by William Golding). But when you think it over, you could say it's a parable about growing up. The arrival of the young man drives them out of the 'Paradise' of their childhood and this starts the process of growing up. They don't turn into 'primitive' humans, they only lose their innocence. They become more mature and finally venture out of their cottage where they used to live for so long. I wouldn't be surprised if there were other interpretations. It's a characteristic of masterworks to be interpreted in different ways.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2004

    awesome, well written, very real

    The author did a great job of making it so believable. I really enjoyed the book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2002

    exceptional, couldn't put it down

    I liked this book and recommend it. I connected with the characters because I was home schooled too. I could really relate to what they were feeling. It's good!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2001

    Great Book!!

    I read this book as a summer assignment for the next school year. My favorite kinds of books are the ones like 'Hatchet' where someone goes into the wilderness and tries to make the best out of their life. I also like books that include nature a lot. This book made me stop and think how I'd do if there was absolutely no electricity or communication to the outside world. I hope that there will be a sequel to this book!

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